show episodes
 
The South China Morning Post political economy team analyse the latest economic data from China, delve deep into the ongoing US-China trade and tech war, and examine China's changing economic relationship with Europe, Africa and the Indo-Pacific. Hear deep background on Beijing's political machinations and how they affect policy and its global diplomacy.
 
The Lawfare Podcast features discussions with experts, policymakers, and opinion leaders at the nexus of national security, law, and policy. On issues from foreign policy, homeland security, intelligence, and cybersecurity to governance and law, we have doubled down on seriousness at a time when others are running away from it. Visit us at www.lawfareblog.com. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
We live in a confusing time, bombarded every day with news from around the world that can be hard to follow, or fully understand. Let Worldly be your guide. Every Thursday, senior writer Zack Beauchamp, senior foreign editor Jennifer Williams, and staff defense writer Alex Ward give you the history and context you need to make sense of the moment and navigate the world around you. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
The Middle East Centre, founded in 1957 at St Antony’s College is the centre for the interdisciplinary study of the modern Middle East in the University of Oxford. Centre Fellows teach and conduct research in the humanities and social sciences with direct reference to the Arab world, Iran, Israel and Turkey, with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However, during our regular Friday seminar series, attracting a wide audience, our distinguished speakers bring topics ...
 
China has emerged as one of the 21st century’s most consequential nations, making it more important than ever to understand how the country is governed. True to the name Pekingology, or the study of the political behavior of the People’s Republic of China, this podcast aims to unpack the behavior of the Chinese Communist Party and implications these actions have within China and for U.S.-China relations. Jude Blanchette, the Freeman Chair in China Studies at CSIS, is joined by various expert ...
 
Join Crisis Group Interim President Richard Atwood and Board Member and Harvard Law School Professor Naz Modirzadeh as they dive deep into the conflicts that rage around the globe with Crisis Group analysts and special guests. These experts bring a unique, on-the-ground perspective to understanding both why those conflicts persist — and what could bring them to an end. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Weekly wrap of events of the week peppered with context, commentary and opinion by a superstar panel. Click here to support Newslaundry: http://bit.ly/paytokeepnewsfree See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Brand & New is a podcast produced by the International Trademark Association (INTA) and focused on innovation. Our host, Audrey Dauvet, shares a new topic every two weeks, on Tuesday—to inform and inspire listeners. Each podcast consists of an open dialogue with experts, visionaries, and influential people from all over the world in order to learn more about the evolution of the legal and intellectual property ecosystem, its concepts, and all actual or potential consequences. Because we cons ...
 
Libyan human rights activist and lawyer Salwa Bugaighis was assassinated on 25 June 2014. Nobody has been held accountable. To many, Salwa embodied all that is positive about the civil society movement that emerged from the 2011 uprising which she helped lead, and she remains an inspiration to this day. 2021 marks the 10th anniversary of that uprising. To mark this historic milestone, we have produced a special season inspired by Salwa’s life and activism, and what it tells us about developm ...
 
On Interpreting India, every two weeks, we bring in voices from India and around the globe to unpack how technology, the economy, and foreign policy impact India’s relationship with the world. Interpreting India is a Carnegie India production and is hosted by Carnegie scholars. In season 2, Srinath Raghavan passes the mic to a new generation of hosts, his colleagues at Carnegie, who will explore the questions that hold the potential to alter India’s trajectory through the coming decade.
 
Twice a week, this podcast will take you on a smart, direct, sometimes scary, sometimes profane, sometimes hilarious tour of the inner workings of American power and of the impact of our leaders and their policies on our standing in the world. Hosted by noted author and commentator David Rothkopf and featuring regulars Rosa Brooks of Georgetown Law School, Kori Schake of Stanford University and David Sanger of the New York Times, the program will be the lively, smart dinner table conversatio ...
 
This podcast cuts through the noise surrounding the future of law. All over the world and across all sectors, expanding and accelerating technologies are changing our lives and even changing us. How can the law and the legal profession keep up with all the changes? Law professors Michael Madison (US) and Dan Hunter (Australia) take a global view of the law and technology ecosystem, talking to lawyers, entrepreneurs, educators, students, and thought leaders across for-profit, non-profit, and ...
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
Emotional Badasses are survivors, thrivers, seekers, and healers! Expand and awaken to your higher purpose, be more present and authentic, find strength in spirituality, quiet the monkey mind of modern society with meditation, and connect deeply with yourself and safe others. We let go of what doesn't serve us to heal old wounds, find our voice guilt-free, and learn to be the hero in our own story, embrace guerrilla self care, and laugh with lightness on the self development path. This show ...
 
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show series
 
The European Commission published its second annual report on the rule of law among EU member states this week, with particular criticism levelled at Hungary and Poland. Government officials from both states lashed out against the report, which they said was commissioned in bad faith. Czech lawyer Věra Jourová, the European Commission Vice-Presiden…
 
Sets of rules, norms, and standards that make up international law provide a broad framework for actions of countries around the world. It also has a profound effect on our daily lives, governing, for example, how we travel or how we send or receive money from abroad. On this podcast, we discuss how international law is enforced, how it affects Ame…
 
It might seem somewhat paradoxical that in the Wars of 1898 and their aftermath—the era in which the United States expanded its imperial reach deep into the Caribbean and Pacific—international law became a feature of US foreign policy. In the midst of all of the militarism (think of Teddy Roosevelt’s roughriders storming Cuba), colonial conquest, a…
 
As the Dixie fire ravages northern California, Pacific Gas and Electric has admitted that its equipment could have sparked it. The utility company has sparked fires before, including the deadly Camp fire in 2018. As it emerged from bankruptcy last year, PG&E set up a million dollar trust for survivors. But an investigation reveals that the payout h…
 
It's been 50 years since Jackson Browne recorded "Doctor My Eyes," his first hit in which the world's troubles have caused the singer's tear ducts to run dry. Fifteen albums and eight Grammy nominations later, now out with his first new album in seven years. NewsHour Weekend's Tom Casciato talked with Browne in Los Angeles about his new work, and t…
 
In this episode of “Occupied Thoughts,” FMEP's Kristin McCarthy talks to Avner Gvaryahu (Breaking the Silence) about a new collection of testimonies from former Israeli soldiers highlighting the IDF's complicity in settler violence - and the larger system within which Israeli soldiers and settlers operate. You can read the new collection - entitled…
 
Nikki has fun and gets excited about science and music with Brain.fm CEO, highly sensitive person, and brain training enthusiast, Dan Clark. For a free 30 day trial visit: https://www.brain.fm/redeem/emotionalbadass To get 20% off your subscription use code: use code:By Nikki Eisenhauer, Dan Clark
 
On the show this week, Chris Hedges discusses the writer and intellectual Susan Sontag with her biographer Benjamin Moser.Susan Sontag, who wrote about art, feminism, politics, celebrity, style, homosexuality, illness, fascism, and war, was that rare species in American society – an intellectual celebrity. She traveled to Cuba as a naive political …
 
From August 10, 2019: The United Kingdom has a new Prime Minister. It also has a looming cliff it is careening toward and about to leap off of on Halloween of this year. This week, Benjamin Wittes sat down with his Brookings colleague Amanda Sloat to talk about all things Brexit. They talked about the new British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, his v…
 
The last few years have seen a precipitous crumbling of international agreements and previously accepted norms of coexistence, planet Earth looks increasingly small for growing national egos, with one notable exception. Space exploration remains one of the few areas where nations not only compete but also cooperate. Is it likely to stay this way?…
 
A year after they were postponed due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Olympics kicked off in Tokyo, Japan-- but not without controversies. The opening ceremony was held without spectators and most competitions are being held without an in-person audience. Meanwhile, as COVID-19 cases rise, public outcry against the Games has grown. New York Times Toky…
 
On Maryland's eastern shore, small islands used by birds for nesting are disappearing. That coincides with a steep drop in several species of colonial nesting birds in the state. But this spring, in what's being described as a 'Hail Mary', advocates have launched an artificial nesting platform to provide habitat for birds. Hari Sreenivasan provides…
 
Amid political instability and violence in Haiti, human rights activists are demanding the Biden administration do more to protect Haitian migrants, especially those at the U.S.-Mexico border. NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano spoke with Guerline Jozef, founder and executive director of the non-profit, Haitian Bridge Alliance, about what she call…
 
Nobel Peace Prize-winner Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed of Ethiopia launched a government offensive last November against rebels in the northern region of Tigray. At the time, he promised the war would be over in a matter of weeks. But the ongoing conflict has led to thousands of deaths, displaced almost 2 million people, and led to charges of ethnic cl…
 
This week, host Akanksha Kumar is joined by Aishwarya Iyer, a reporter with the Quint, and Monika Mondal, an independent journalist. They talk about Aishwarya’s documentary Silencing Rape, which tracks the lives of four sexual assault survivors for over a year in Uttar Pradesh’s impoverished Bundelkhand region. Reflecting on what she gathered from …
 
Even Alexander the Great did not successfully occupy Afghanistan – and George W Bush sure isn’t Alexander the Great. After more than a trillion dollars spent and, more importantly, an ocean of blood spilled, the US empire is again retreating under fire. It is reminiscent of the scramble out of Saigon and the result will surely be the same. So, what…
 
War over Wuhan, as Senator Rand Paul battles it out with Anthony Fauci, leading one late night host to fantasize about the senator's death. Joe Biden has a town hall on CNN and let's say it wasn't his best performance. Steve Malzberg has more of what the media won't show you. Shootings and homicides are a common occurrence in the city of Chicago. T…
 
Jesse Ventura and Brigida Santos consider the State Department’s admission that seven of the alleged assassins of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse had received prior training in the US. They also discuss how the first batch of Marines for the Space Force is shaping up. Finally, Ajamu Baraka talks about the colonial history of Haiti and brings us up …
 
From November 24, 2018: John Carlin served as assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s National Security Division from April 2014 to October 2016. In his new book with Garrett Graff, called “Dawn of the Code War: America's Battle Against Russia, China, and the Rising Global Cyber Threat," Carlin explains the cyber conflicts the U.S. …
 
In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max and Stacy look at President Joe Biden’s call that the Fed should do whatever is necessary to help the economy recover. With stock markets and property prices at all-time-highs, however, what exactly is this ‘recovery’ of which the president speaks? In the second half, Max chats to Tavi Costa of Crescat Capi…
 
On this episode of Going Underground, we speak to Haitian Ambassador to the UK Euvrard Saint Amand. He discusses the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, who was killed in his private residence, what is known about the perpetrators, such as the fact that many are Colombian and Haitian ex-military personnel, some having received US training, an…
 
Lee Camp looks into a solution to humanity’s widespread destruction of agricultural land. Hydroponic farming technologies offer society the ability to feed everyone using less land and less water. The corporate world is always looking for ways to ruin anything good, but, barring their interference, these technologies could improve billions of lives…
 
National Geographic’s latest survey says nearly half of us now have a heightened fear of climate change. Following a year of devastating wildfires, severe floods, and rolling blackouts – is it time to reimagine America’s power grid?SmartPower president Brian Keane explains the grim reality of extreme weather, which has become an immediate threat to…
 
The United States is reviewing proposals for a collaborative initiative in Asia for the 21st century, just years after former President Trump axed the planned Trans-Pacific Partnership. In this episode, we dive into a similar plan to counter Chinese tech power in the region. Then, as the week draws to a close, we take a look around the globe to see…
 
Time Codes: 0:57 - Headlines 5:45 - Pegasus snooping 49:30 - Afghanistan crisis 1:24:15 - Tokyo Olympics 1:34:24 - Subscriber emails 1:54:13 - Recommendations This week, Abhinandan Sekhri, Raman Kirpal and Manisha Pande are joined by Siddharth Varadarajan, founding editor of the Wire, and Happymon Jacob, author, commentator and JNU professor. Siddh…
 
In our news wrap Friday, a federal appeals court has ruled against a moratorium on most residential evictions during the pandemic. Shooting and protests erupted outside the funeral of Haiti's slain President Jovenel Moïse. Monsoon rains in western India triggered landslides, killing more than 100 people. The search for bodies officially ended at a …
 
Usually a star-studded show, the Tokyo Olympics opened with a quieter ceremony. National teams paraded to a nearly empty stadium. It was noisier outside, as protests against holding the games in the middle of a pandemic continued. Only 23% of Japan's population is fully vaccinated. William Brangham speaks to Associated Press reporter Philip Crowthe…
 
Hong Kong authorities arrested the authors of a children's book this week and accused them of sedition. The book, "Defenders of Sheep Village," explores the politics of a protest movement, facing off against an increasingly assertive China using animals. Nick Schifrin has the story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/…
 
Since the pandemic began, children have largely been spared from severe illness and hospitalization. But nearly a year and a half later, the number of adolescent COVID cases is rising. While rare, for many it includes debilitating symptoms that can drag on for months. Black and Latino children have been especially impacted. Special correspondent Sa…
 
The number of apprehensions at the U.S.-Mexico border have climbed steadily this year. In May alone, border agents reported more than 180,0000 encounters with migrants. Lorraine Rivera of Arizona Public Media reports from the ground with U.S. Customs and Border Protection during a sweep of the Sonoran Desert. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://…
 
New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the Jan. 6 insurrection investigation, the infrastructure and budget negotiations in Congress, and vaccination efforts in America. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funde…
 
As ballparks fill up around the country due to an easing of pandemic restrictions, Jeffrey Brown looks at a new exhibit on the long history of Latinos playing baseball and how they changed the sport fundamentally in the U.S. It's part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Professor Alpa Shah in London joins Emily Tamkin in Washington DC and Ido Vock in Berlin to discuss the death of Father Stan Swamy in prision in India and what it means for the plight of human rights campaigners in India. Then in You Ask Us, they answer your question on what the international reaction to Father Stan's death should be. If you have a…
 
The opening ceremony of the 32nd Olympic Games began in Tokyo at one o’clock on Friday afternoon (Prague time), in a stadium designed to hold tens of thousands but without a single sports fan in attendance, due to the coronavirus pandemic. Also missing from the “Parade of Nations” were heartbroken Czech athletes and officials who had tested positiv…
 
The history of the Czech nation during the tumultuous twentieth century is the subject of a new major exhibition opening up this Friday in the National Museum in Prague. Around 2,000 square metres of space in the museum’s New Building are dedicated to the exhibit, which mixes historical artefacts with multi-media presentations to bring the period a…
 
Hear analysis from US correspondent Owen Churchill and Beijing-based correspondent Kinling Lo after this week's claims and counter-claims of state-sponsored hacking attacks, and why NATO's involvement is significant. How will this affect the first face-to-face meeting of senior US and China diplomats after the terse Alaska meeting in March? Sports …
 
The South China Morning Post political economy team analyse the latest economic data from China, delve deep into the ongoing US-China trade and tech war, and examine China's changing economic relationship with Europe, Africa and the Indo-Pacific. Hear deep background on Beijing's political machinations and how they affect policy and global diplomac…
 
It's been a busy couple of weeks at Guantanamo Bay, a place that has not had a busy couple of weeks in a while. There was a transfer, there was a resumption of military commissions, and the chief prosecutor of military commissions resigned abruptly. To go over these events, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Steve Vladeck, a Lawfare contributing editor …
 
On the show this week, Chris Hedges discuss economic disobedience and debt refusal with Thomas Gokey from Debt Collective.Most people in the United States are burdened by staggering amounts of debt. They accrue mounting debt because they are forced to debt-finance healthcare, education, housing, and even the cost of their own incarceration. When th…
 
Lee Camp sits down with investigative journalist Ann Garrison to learn about US imperialist goals in Ethiopia. Garrison is a contributing editor at Black Agenda Report and has been reporting on the civil war in the country. The US’ intentions in Ethiopia can be mapped out with a look at its history of “humanitarian” intervention and its actions dur…
 
Russia has issued an objection to elements of the US-Germany accord with regard to the Nord Stream 2 pipeline. Boom Bust’s Ben Swann and former US Energy Department adviser Bill Hederman discuss the controversy and US concerns about the project. Plus, could we soon see the return of bitcoin payments to electric-car giant Tesla? Boom Bust’s Christy …
 
The Democrat-dominated Select Committee investigating the events of January 6 on Capitol Hill has been constituted and will start proceedings next week. Will it be merely political theater – a proverbial lunchroom food fight on national display? One thing is for sure – these proceedings will reflect deep political divisions. Sadly, finding the trut…
 
The image most of us have of whalers includes harpoons and intentional trauma. Yet eating commercially caught seafood leads to whales' entanglement and slow death in rope and nets, and the global shipping routes that bring us readily available goods often lead to death by collision. We--all of us--are whalers, marine scientist and veterinarian Mich…
 
What influence can online and visual activism have on protest movements? With a wave of anti-establishment protests sweeping over East and Southeast Asia over the past couple of years, the online phenomenon of the #MilkTeaAlliance has gained increasing international recognition. In this episode of the Nordic Asia Podcast Chiara Elisabeth Pecorari i…
 
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