show episodes
 
Sounds from our academics, alumni, students and other brave thinkers, brought to you by the UCL Institute of Education (IOE). We're the world's leading centre for education and social science research, courses and teaching, and a faculty of University College London (UCL). Powered by UCL Minds - bringing together UCL’s knowledge, insights, and ideas through events, activities, and digital content open to everyone. More from the IOE: https://ucl.ac.uk/ioe
 
A podcast with School of Public Policy and UCL academics alongside practitioners who will discuss the politics and policy of Covid-19. The format of the podcast will include short presentations from each speaker, with most of the time dedicated to discussion and debate. Listeners will have the option to pre-submit questions to our panel using the links on our website and each podcast will be available to listen to on all major platforms at any time following release.
 
Join us as we celebrate 50 years of the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70), which has been following the lives of 17,000 people born in Great Britain during a single week in 1970. This podcast series takes listeners on a journey through British social and political history, and explores BCS70’s numerous contributions to British science and society. Across six episodes, the series tells our study members’ story and charts the first five decades of the study.
 
Loading …
show series
 
The ability for young people to access Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics learning opportunities can be quite limiting. Here’s how IOE researchers are collaborating with others to break down barriers and ramp up representation. The YESTEM (Youth Equity + STEM) project brings together researchers and practitioners in the UK and US to d…
 
Girls’ education is a key focus for the G7 this year. This event explores an innovative framework for measuring gender equality in education, as well as the politics of steering between the complex relationships described by social research on gender and girls’ education and the clarity on data needed for public policy. The Accountability for Gende…
 
In this our final episode for the current academic year, we’re going to tackle one of the biggest questions of political science: How do you run an effective government? In particular, how do you build a bureaucracy that’s able to deliver? Is it better to have neutral civil servants, who are appointed on merit and retain their posts whichever parti…
 
Our ability to communicate through the sense of touch has never been more important, as groundbreaking work takes place to make touch a reality digitally. We also hear about how UCL researchers are reaching beyond their own fields of expertise to make this and other innovations possible. Professor Carey Jewitt leads the IN-TOUCH project exploring h…
 
Many of the most important policy decisions that a state can make relate to education. What kind of education should children receive? How far should parents be able to dictate that choice? Is it acceptable to have schools that instruct pupils in a particular religious faith? Should elite private schools be allowed to exist? Given that such schools…
 
Is the GCSE system intrinsically flawed, or simply a victim of the high-stakes accountability system in which it sits? If it really has no benefits to offer, what could its demise offer to young people’s education? Full event information: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/events/2021/apr/virtual-event-what-if-we-got-rid-gcses #IOEDebates In association wit…
 
The future of the Union here in the UK – that is, the union of England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland – is very much in the news. In Scotland, many opinion polls over the past year (though not so much over the last few months) have suggested majority support for independence, and political parties that want another referendum on the issue s…
 
We're delighted to be between your ears for the 10th season of the IOE's podcast about education and social science research and its impact on policy, practice and our everyday lives. This season focuses on how IOE researchers are finding opportunities to extend the impact of their work through collaboration with colleagues at UCL and beyond. Liste…
 
Most countries have a document call the Constitution – a legal text setting out basic principles of how that country is governed. And in most of those countries there’s a constitutional court (or supreme court) that determines whether the ordinary laws passed by the legislature are compatible with the Constitution and that strikes them down if it c…
 
How people are regaining their voice after their voice boxes are removed, through the beatboxing project Shout at Cancer; how a group of LGBTQ + refugees in Brazil are using film to tell their stories; and how health students and advocates are sharing the impact of their work through poetry. This episode is reposted from the #MadeAtUCL podcast Seas…
 
The coming week sees the first anniversary of the murder of George Floyd. His killing by a white police officer in the American city of Minneapolis, sparked a global wave of protests. The vast majority of these were peaceful. But some were not. It’s estimated that, in the United States, acts of rioting, arson, and looting in the weeks that followed…
 
Dr Will Brehm considers his teaching and podcasting to be important parts of his academic life, and issued himself a challenge. “Why couldn’t I infuse my teaching practice with podcast pedagogies? Why couldn’t I utilise the medium of sound and audio to enrich the study of education and international development?” In an effort to democratise and emp…
 
Alexandra Hartman is Associate Professor in Political Science and Public Policy here at UCL, and her research focuses on the political economy of institutions in fragile states. She looks not just at formal political institutions such as courts or legislatures, but also at what we political scientists like to call informal institutions – the unwrit…
 
Play can mean everything, and sometimes nothing at all – and that’s ok. Professor John Potter credits his early career as an East London primary school teacher as a key influence in his research interest in digital media and play. It’s in no way a surprise for RFTRW host Dr Keri Wong to hear that play connects to children’s lives in a way that the …
 
This week, we’re focusing on politics in the United States. President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have been in office for a little over 100 days now. So how is it going? Has Biden been sleepy Joe? Has he pursued the path of moderation and coalition-building that has characterized so much of his long career? Or has he turned out much …
 
Coming from a part of the world where speaking multiple languages is part of life, multilingualism has always been an area of study that’s close to home for Dr Ruanni Tupas. Ruanni joins Dr Keri Wong to discuss how getting to know the lived realities of students and teachers shapes his research and help reconcile academic theorisation with the mess…
 
The gap in levels of attainment between pupils from disadvantaged and more advantaged backgrounds is a longstanding feature of England’s schools system. It’s been a focus for successive governments, from New Labour’s efforts to ‘narrow’ the gap, and subsequent Coalition and Conservative governments’ objective to ‘close’ it. According to DfE data, s…
 
Dr Zsófia Demjén and Dr Talia Isaacs join Dr Sam Sims to talk about their research examining key issues and concerns in healthcare communication. You may have noticed particularly during the Covid-19 pandemic the use of military-style words - the frontline, battlegrounds, arsenal - Dr Demjén and Dr Isaacs’ work on the way language is used by cancer…
 
Professor Chloë Marshall drops into the Research for the Real World virtual studio to talk to Dr Sam Sims about her work focusing on language development in deaf children and in particular, sign language development. We hear about the challenges in diagnosing developmental delays among deaf children, the creation of a toolkit to aid awareness for t…
 
In public health, we often refer to 'hard to reach' groups, but are we doing enough to listen to them? Hear from the co-founders of Five X More, and UCL academic Dr Carol Rivas, to explore the role of discrimination and structural disadvantage in the health inequalities experienced by different marginalised groups in the UK, and the incredible work…
 
This season we'll be hearing from IOE experts covering incredibly interesting and important areas of research that involve communication and linguistics. Dr Keri Wong and Dr Sam Sims will be chatting with: Dr Ruanni Tupas about discovering different audiences with different languages, Professor John Potter about digital communication and creativity…
 
Environmental degradation is the global challenge of our times. As demonstrated vividly by the climate strikes among school pupils, many young people feel passionate about ‘saving the planet’, but this cause is also a source of anxiety and even helplessness. Is the National Curriculum and the knowledge and skills it seeks to develop fit-for-purpose…
 
The covid-19 pandemic has been a severe test for the European Union as well as for its member-states: a test in which European cooperation has often been found wanting, in particular when it came to its vaccine programme. But this test has also led to a deepening of European solidarity, manifested most prominently in the European recovery fund. Wha…
 
Democracy is what one social scientist once famously called an ‘essentially contested concept’ – one that we are never likely all to agree about. And disagreements over the form that democracy should take have lately sparked major political conflicts in many democratic countries. How far were politicians in the UK obliged to follow the so-called ‘w…
 
Jamie Frost created and runs the hugely influential and ground-breaking website for maths tuition Dr Frost Maths, which provides an online learning platform, teaching resources, videos and a bank of exam questions to practise on, all for free. When the coronavirus pandemic shut down schools, Dr Frost Maths became a lifeline for students around the …
 
Less than two months into his term, President Joe Biden is signing his first major piece of legislation, a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. What are his other domestic priorities, and who are the leading figures in his administration to deliver them? What obstacles does he face in Congress and elsewhere, and can he overcome them? To discus…
 
Answering your questions about how children learn to read and how to nurture their interest in reading in and out of school, in IOE Coffee Breaks. There is growing evidence to show the wide-ranging benefits of reading for young children’s learning and wellbeing. In particular, research suggests that the more time children (and adults) spend reading…
 
We’re returning this week to the topic of climate change. You may have heard our episode a few weeks ago exploring global climate governance. Well this week, we turn our attention to global climate justice. The climate crisis has been caused mostly by the rich countries of the old industrial world. But many of the effects of that crisis are being f…
 
A data-driven discussion with Professor Alex Bryson about the ways women and ethnic minorities experience discrimination in the labour market and what can be done to mitigate this. Dr Sam Sims hears about Professor Bryson’s work, including investigations into discrimination in the workplace across characteristics such as gender, race and sexuality,…
 
Nick Herbert is a former Minister, and the founder of GovernUp. Last summer he launched the Commission for Smart Government, to tackle the systemic problems of government in the UK: departmental silos, a muddled centre exercising weak financial management, unaccountable agencies, inability to learn from mistakes. In this seminar he is joined by Sir…
 
As children across the UK start heading back to the classroom, Vivienne Parry speaks to Dr Amelia Roberts (UCL Institute of Education), and Professor Monica Lakhanpaul (UCL Population Health Science), whose work focuses on children and education. With a focus on vulnerable children, our guests tell us more about the projects they're involved with t…
 
We typically divide the modern state into three branches: the legislature, the executive, and the judiciary. On a traditional view, the legislature makes the laws, the executive implements them, and the judiciary decides on disputes. In reality, in most states, the executive in fact plays a much bigger role than that. It not only executes the will …
 
The British media tend to report on Brexit only from the British point of view. In this seminar we redress the balance by inviting four foreign correspondents based in London to talk about how Brexit has been viewed from France, Germany, Italy and Poland. What conclusions have leading European countries drawn from the whole Brexit process; and wher…
 
Dr Keri Wong hears from Dr Antonina Tereshchenko about the study she led investigating issues facing Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) teachers’ employment. We find out whether there are differences in the pattern of employment between types of schools, the factors that affect retention, and recommendations for stakeholders such as school lea…
 
IOE Coffee Breaks reviews the contemporary debate on the school curriculum. The past decade has seen a strong push towards a ‘knowledge-led’ curriculum for schools in England, as reflected in reforms to the National Curriculum. Nevertheless, polarised discourse that pits ‘Gradgrind’ against child-centred learning continues, with each variously pres…
 
How the European Union relates to the world of business has long been a matter of great contention. Scepticism towards the EU on the right of politics has for decades been fuelled by the perception that Brussels is a bureaucratic regulation generator, with little understanding of how business operates. On the Eurosceptic left, by contrast, the EU h…
 
How’s work going for you? Do you feel like you’re working harder than ever before and have little to show for it? We delve into the quality of a number of professions today. Dr Sam Sims is joined by Professor Francis Green to talk about his interest and academic journey covering labour economics, education economics and political economy. Full show…
 
Deirdre Hutton has experienced all those spheres of regulation, and more, having just stepped down from ten years as chair of the Civil Aviation Authority. In this seminar she is joined by Professor Cary Coglianese, director of the Penn Program on Regulation, and Walter Merricks, former Chief Ombudsman of the Financial Ombudsman Service. Together t…
 
Hear from Professor Carey Jewitt and doctoral researcher Lili Golmohammadi (UCL Institute of Education) on digital touch technologies and touchy vocab, student Alessia Qiu (Natural Sciences BSc) who joined UCL Volunteering to help a vulnerable group during the pandemic, and Dr Helge Wurdemann’s (UCL Engineering Sciences) robotic limbs that make the…
 
There is common agreement that climate change poses the greatest policy challenge of our age. The costs of getting it wrong would be immense, but the barriers to getting it right are dauntingly high. Action is needed on a global scale. But global politics is deeply fractured, and individual countries may be tempted to free ride on the actions of ot…
 
This season’s exploration of the world of work begins with a discussion about the transitions and trajectories available to teenagers. Dr Lynne Rogers is the Co-Director of the Centre for Post-14 Education and Work and has long-standing interests in teacher and lecturer training and learning in further and higher education and other professional se…
 
Wherever you find culture, you find Caroline Marcus. She creates innovative programmes in museums and heritage settings, from the Royal Opera House to UCL. While Caroline teaches MA students on the IOE’s Museums and Galleries in Education programme, she is also an advisor, producer, and programmer for many cultural organisations across the UK. The …
 
We officially welcome our presenters Dr Keri Wong and Dr Sam Sims to the Research for the Real World podcast! Hear a little bit about them as well as our guests for Season 8, who will be sharing insights about these aspects of the world of work: Dr Lynne Rogers - the transition to higher and further education Professor Francis Green - employment pr…
 
In this seminar he is joined by Ciaran Martin, Chief Executive of the National Cyber Security Centre 2016-2020, to discuss spycraft, how raw intelligence is analysed, and how intelligence officers then use that information – often contradictory or incomplete – to build the most accurate possible image of the world. The ways of thinking used in inte…
 
Girls’ access to education was already precarious in many parts of the world prior to COVID-19: around 130 million girls of school age were not in class. Many factors contributed to this picture, from cultural attitudes that don’t prioritise the education of girls, to the threat of gender-based violence in schools. The Sustainable Development Goal …
 
The politics of asylum is more important than ever before. At the end of 2019, according to data from the UNHCR, there were 80 million displaced persons around the world. More than half of those were displaced within their own countries. But 25 million were refugees, and a further 4.2 million were seeking asylum in another country. So how do the co…
 
Discussing home-schooling and play, home-working, parenting - and how to juggle them all. With the latest announcement that schools won’t be reopening until at least the 8th March, Coronavirus: The Whole Story speaks to three UCL experts to explore how home-schooling is affecting children and parents, and some practical tips and tricks for listener…
 
*This episode includes audio of a video shown during this event, some of which is not in English. You can access captions and subtitles with this video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfGTiB11qNA Ranjitsinh Disale has been bridging barriers for girls' education in rural India by innovating with QR coded textbooks. School attendance can be as …
 
China regards the island of Taiwan as a breakaway province; Taiwan’s leaders say it is an independent state. As China rises to superpower status, it has shown greater interest in reclaiming territory long regarded as its own, in the South China Sea, along the Himalayan border – and in Taiwan. The growing tensions could drag the US into the fray. To…
 
Care ethics is a branch of moral philosophy that focuses on how we relate to, respond to, and care for each other. Its central question is not about what abstract principles of justice we should follow, but rather about how we should respond to the needs of a given person in a particular set of circumstances. It’s been around for several decades, b…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login