19th Century Women public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
BAPcast, a Black and proud herstory podcast, is set to release its first episodes on June 19th. With a focus on Black women who tend to exist in the periphery of U.S. history lessons, host Mary Eliska Dorn seeks to fill in some of the gaps she suspects are as prevalent in the average American’s understanding of Black history as they have been in her own. Mary Eliska is a Brooklyn photographer whose interest in critical race theory and history has only been piqued in recent years. “As a kid g ...
 
This weekly class which is uploaded as a podcast episode explores a wide range of themes, topics, texts and traditions which demonstrate the exemplary lives and practices of Muslim women on the "Straight Path" throughout history and in contemporary times. Our aim is to emulate the righteous women who have come before us in order to navigate the turbulent reality of the modern world, by seeking guidance and inspiration from their religious, scholarly, social, cultural and educational stories ...
 
NYTF Radio presented by the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene serves to educate listeners on the history of Yiddish Theatre. Season 1 will consist of episodes that trace the early history of Yiddish Theatrical Performance in Europe and United States: From Purim spiels, to Avrom Goldfaden and the Sorceress, to late 19th Century Yiddish Theatre in America. At the National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene, our mission is to celebrate the Yiddish experience through the performing arts by transmittin ...
 
American Utopia tells the story of the Oneida Community, a radical 19th century free-love experiment in communal living. Building on his own research as well as interviews with top historians, host Dan Greenstone illuminates the fascinating lives of the liberated women and men who overturned society’s conventions about marriage, love, sex, work and childrearing. Subscribe now.
 
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps's 1877 novel is set in a New England college town, and focuses on Avis Dobell, a professor's daughter. Avis is a talented painter, and bucks against the constraints placed on women in the 19th century. She wants to pursue a career as an artist and rejects marriage and motherhood, until she meets the charismatic young professor Philip Ostrander. Phelps's novel is a beautifully-written examination of the conflicts between marriage and career for women that is still rele ...
 
This is more than a book about bees and their lives; the author talks about his cats, red ants, and insect psychology in general. Jean Henri Fabre also made waves in his native 19th Century France by insisting that girls be included in his science classes, so I dedicate this recording to certain young women who risk their lives or even the less important attentions of boys simply to learn. - Summary by BellonaTimes
 
The Unclassed tells the story of two friends who are aspiring authors living in London in the late 19th century. Both of them fall in love. Both believe in social change but do not know how to bring it about. Both are sceptical about the values of their times. Both want respectability more then they would admit. This book, unlike many others of it's time, tells about working women, and includes honest descriptions of the slums of London. - Summary by Stav Nisser.
 
The official Lumber City Church podcast with weekly sermon audio and more! Lumber City Church is located in North Tonawanda, NY. NT is nicknamed "The Lumber City" because of it's rich history as one of the most successful lumber ports in the United States in the 19th century. We are a growing community built on blue-collar work ethic and rugged authenticity. Come on in. Bring your baggage and your frayed edges. At first glance you'll see we aren't interested in formality and rigid structures ...
 
Leo Tolstoy’s psychological novel Anna Karenina follows the life of the enchanting and rebellious Anna who seeks to break free from the shackles of society. Set in late 19th century Russia, Anna is portrayed as an ideal, cultivated aristocratic wife, mother and model for women alike. Although at first glance she seems to have it all in life, Anna yearns for love and affection- something her cold diplomatic husband cannot provide. She grows discontent of their loveless relationship, and is ti ...
 
For many people, the name Caroline Herschel will be unfamiliar, but she was one of the most significant women on the English scientific scene during the late 18th and early 19th century. Sister of the well known William Herschel (he of the discovery of Uranus and its moons and many other significant scientific discoveries), she first worked as his assistant in his astronimical works, and then went on to become a noted astronomer in her own right. She discovered eight new comets in her lifeti ...
 
Arthur Schopenhauer, an early 19th century philosopher, made significant contributions to metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics. His work also informed theories of evolution and psychology, largely through his theory of the will to power – a concept which Nietzsche famously adopted and developed. Despite this, he is today, as he was during his life, overshadowed by his contemporary, Hegel. Schopenhauer’s social/psychological views, put forth in this work and in others, are directly derived fro ...
 
An epistolary novel written by renowned French novelist Balzac, who is regarded as one of the founders of realism and a significant influence to later novelists, the novel focuses on two young women who preserve their friendship through regular correspondence. Originally published in the French newspaper La Presse in 1841 as a serial, the piece later became a part of Balzac’s distinguished novel sequence La Comédie Humaine, or The Human Comedy. Furthermore, Letters of Two Brides surrounds in ...
 
Set in 19th century Russia, The Brothers Karamazov (Russian: Братья Карамазовы) is the last novel written by the illustrious author Fyodor Dostoyevsky who died a few months before the book's publication. The deeply philosophical and passionate novel tells the story of Fyodor Karamazov, an immoral debauch whose sole aim in life is the acquisition of wealth. Twice married, he has three sons whose welfare and upbringing, he cares nothing about. At the beginning of the story, Dimitri Karamazov, ...
 
Austen’s timeless romantic classic, follows the lives of the five Bennett sisters, who live in a time where an advantageous marriage and social status are considered a fundamental for any woman to stand a fair chance at life. Set at the turn of the 19th century, Pride and Prejudice catches a perfect glimpse not only of a time when women were socially and economically dependent solely on their marital status, but also as an age of enlightenment and witness of the French Revolution. This roman ...
 
All of us have our own favorite parts of a book which we love to read and re-read. The nicest part of this is that each time you read, you find something new to savor and remember. For those of us who haven't read some of the classics, a teaser in the form of a single chapter would probably be intriguing enough to want us to take up the book and start reading. Favorite Chapters Collection 001 is one such delicious tasting table! Ten chapters from some of the best known classics in English ar ...
 
An epistolary novel, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall follows the courageous journey of the protagonist, Helen Graham, as she struggles to escape her socially imposed role as dutiful wife, while also acting on her moral responsibilities as a mother and self-respect as a woman. Published in 1848, under the pseudonym Acton Bell, the novel provoked much criticism at the time of its release due to its shocking content and atypical portrayal of an English wife, who not only defies the strict conventio ...
 
This little gem of a book was probably the first introduction to Shakespeare that most readers have had as children. Tales from Shakespeare was written in 1807 by a young clerk called Charles Lamb in the offices of the East India Company. Lamb co-authored them with his beloved sister Mary. The pair lived together for life, having gone through immense trauma caused by mental illness and tragedy. However, far from being a melancholy duo, they led an active and ample social life in the company ...
 
Regarded as one of James’ finest works, The Portrait of a Lady revolves around the life and the development of Isabel Archer as she embarks on a scrupulous journey of self-discovery, forced to choose between her individual freedom and the preset conventions of society. Moreover, the novel explores themes of existentialism, objectification of women, wealth, suffering, and the conflict between individual longing and social conformity. Set in the second half of the 19th century, the novel opens ...
 
“As you see, we’re flying over an island. A city. A particular city. And this is a story of a number of people, and a story also of the city itself.” That’s from the opening voice-over of the 1948 movie The Naked City, which was a very big deal when it was made, because it was a rare studio film that was shot entirely, lock stock and barrel, on the streets of New York City. You see, the American motion picture industry began in New York, at the end of the 19th century – Thomas Edison and oth ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
[Advert for The History of Egypt Podcast read before the show: Welcome to the Agora, a collection of podcasts from wonderful and skilled creators. My name is Dominic Perry, I am the host of The History of Egypt Podcast. Did you ever have an “ancient Egypt phase” as a child? Maybe you found the stories of pyramids, mummies, temples, and treasures in…
 
What does the story of Sayyida Zulaykha and Nabi Yusuf alayhi salam in the Qur'an really tell us about women, passion and acting on it? In this episode we explore the events of the attempted seduction as described in the Qur'anic text, and examine three interpretive methods for understanding those events. We look at classical tafsir literature, poe…
 
How did our female ancestors cope with periods, childbirth, menopause? How did they understand their own bodies? How did they feel about childbirth? What was their lived experiences like, compared to ours today? On this episode of #TwiceRemoved, Dr Sara Read helps me to explore the lives of our Early Modern female ancestors. Find out more about Sar…
 
History is not simply an assemblage of facts, it includes feelings and sentiments. Our ancestors cooked and ate certain dishes, composed and played music, lived and loved. To understand the past we cannot just think, we must also experience. In this episode, I and four of my colleagues and friends got together to read a number of poems written duri…
 
On a sweltering July day in 1854, Elizabeth Jennings had zero intention of letting racial discrimination make her late to church. Her violent removal from the “whites-only” streetcar she had been riding was the beginning of the end for racial segregation on New York streetcars. https://daily.jstor.org/the-woman-who-refused-to-leave-a-whites-only-st…
 
Alhamdulillah this class on the woman of the Hajj - Sayyida Haajar - coincided with the first day of the 10 days of the sacred month of Dhul Hijja - the month of the Hajj. We discuss how Sayyida Haajar became part of the family of Nabi Ibrahim (Alayhi salam), we look at some 17th century European artwork depicting her 'banishment' to the desert. We…
 
Intro: Today’s special episode is an interview with Dr.s Christine and Tracy Adams. Christine Adams is a professor of history at St. Mary’s College of Maryland whose works include A Taste for Comfort and Status: A Bourgeois Family in Eighteenth-Century France and Poverty, Charity and Motherhood: Maternal Societies in Nineteenth-Century France. Trac…
 
[Advert for The History of Egypt Podcast read before the show: Welcome to the Agora, a collection of podcasts from wonderful and skilled creators. My name is Dominic Perry, I am the host of The History of Egypt Podcast. Did you ever have an “ancient Egypt phase” as a child? Maybe you found the stories of pyramids, mummies, temples, and treasures in…
 
Sylvia Valentine discusses smallpox, inoculation and those that opposed compulsory vaccination in this highly topical episode of #TwiceRemoved. What was smallpox? How dangerous was it? How was inoculation developed and how risky was it?! How did the government try to enforce inoculation and how did our ancestors react? For more information on resou…
 
This class takes us on a journey from the creation of men and women (our forefathers Sayyidna Adam and Sayyida Hawwa on them be peace) and the establishment of the principles and practices of their relationship in the metaphysical, unseen world, to looking at the consequences of nonadherence to those principles and practices in the contemporary wor…
 
Intro: Today’s special episode is an interview with Jesse Alexander and Catherine Pfauth on an upcoming project they are involved in called Glory and Defeat. Cathérine is a research assistant at the Ludwigsburg University of Education. Jesse is a historian, educator and higher education professional based in Vienna, Austria. He holds a BA in Histor…
 
The story of Sayyida Asiya provides several opportunities to examine the lives of the many women in the story of Nabi Musa (AS), and we study the Qur'anic verses and hadith which address them all. This class also engages with surah al-Tahreem and the stories of the six women who are mentioned in it, and how it is a very important surah about the fa…
 
On today’s episode, we interview NYTF Associate Artistic Director Motl Didner who, along with Zalmen Mlotek, are in the midst of putting together A Yiddish Renaissance, A Virtual Concert Celebration. Motl took the time out of his day to conversation titled “Putting It All Together” is a full on in depth background of the Yiddish Renaissance, the ri…
 
Today we’ll talk about the end of Emperor Charles’ reign, his death and legacy. But before we do I want to wrap up a few loose ends which I didn’t get to cover before. To start, let’s talk about Frankish relations with the Islamic world. We’ve already covered Spain, which was an area of constant conflict as Charles increased his holdings ever south…
 
Discover the funeral traditions of your 18th Century ancestors. How did they evolve and how do they compare to today's practices? How did our ancestors find an undertaker - and how did undertakers come about? Dr Dan O'Brien, visiting research fellow at the University of Bath, digs into the history of funerals and undertakers. Find out more on www.g…
 
Before exploring the explanations of the events and meanings of the life of Sayyida Maryam, the Mother of 'Isa may peace be upon them both, we look at the what storytelling is and its role in the Qur'an. We also examine some of the scholarly arguments about whether Sayyida Maryam was a prophet or not, and how we should approach understanding her st…
 
Charity Edna Adams grew up experiencing the hardships of segregation, but never let it detract her from doing her best, even in the completely uncharted territory of the U.S. Women’s Army Auxillary Corps. Further reading: “One Woman’s Army” by Charity Adams Earley https://www.army.mil/women/history/wac.html “The Black Female Battalion That Stood Up…
 
Gary: Today’s special episode is by Emma Kavanagh. Emma is a doctoral candidate in Musicology at the University of Oxford, where she is the inaugural Louis Curran scholar at Linacre College. She holds a BA from the University of Cambridge, and an MA from the University of Nottingham. Emma’s research interests focus on opera and musical culture in F…
 
Subtitle: How Harriet Tubman could change your perspective on who belongs outdoors Episode description: You probably learned about Harriet Tubman in school growing up — how she led slaves to freedom on the underground railroad. But she was a lot more than an activist and freedom fighter. She was a daughter, wife, entrepreneur — and a talented outdo…
 
Our brief study of the life of the leader of the women of the Ummah on earth and in the celestial realm focuses on how to connect with her rank and emulate her in our daily lives. But to do this, we need a sound way of understanding her life story. What framework of understanding do we apply to find what we need from the events in her life? What ar…
 
On today’s episode, we have a very insightful interview today conducted by the great Budd Mishkin from NY1 and currently on 1010 WINS. Budd is in conversation on a beautiful sunday day with NYTF’s very own Artistic Director Zalmen Mlotek. Zalmen is in the middle of gearing up for the National Yiddish Theater Folksbiene’s upcoming A YIDDISH RENAISSA…
 
As part of the Agora Podcast Network, this week we are recommending the Wittenberg to Westphalia. Join Ben through the European wars of religion and learn how early modern Europe was made. In the last episode on the Carolingian Renaissance I talked about how the Franks expanded their knowledge on nearly every major subject. One area I didn’t manage…
 
What was life like for disabled or differently abled people during the Industrial Revolution? How would they have considered themselves and their disabilities? How did others consider disabled people? In this episode (recorded live) Professor David Turner from the University of Swansea helps us to explore the lives of our disabled ancestors during …
 
In this class, we explore and analyze three distinct yet interrelated topics: A Prophetic educational methodology which includes a specific hadith on the four best women in Paradise. Ancient Arabia: Contexts and Contradictions. We discuss particular concepts in the social, cultural and economic context in which Sayyida Khadijah peace be upon her wa…
 
Gary: Today’s special episode is by Matthew McDonald. Matthew is a PhD candidate in European History at Princeton University. He is a scholar of the history of the French language, with a particular interest in how European elites spoke French in countries like Germany, Sweden, and Russia during the Ancien Régime. Today he will tell the story of ho…
 
Welcome to this new series of classes from MISK Women - the Muslim Institute for Sacred Knowledge! The podcast uploads here are the class recordings which are lightly edited and presented here without the Q and A session at the end. In this first class, we introduce the course and some of the main objectives of studying the lives and legacies of Wo…
 
Historian Laura Newman shares the work of Addressing Health, a project dedicated to examining and exploring the health of Victorian and Edwardian postal workers. Essential viewing for any one with a Post Office ancestor AND anyone interested in the history of occupational health. From sick days to TB fears. Find out more on www.genealogystories.co.…
 
Anne Lister was a diarist who famously recorded her intimate relationships with women (amongst many many other things). Subject of the brilliant BBC Drama #GentlemanJack, in this interview I talk to the Packed With Potential Project about their work to decipher Anne's diaries and to discover the 'real Anne'. Find out more at www.genealogystories.co…
 
Julia Laite (of Birkbeck University) investigates the lives of our female domestic servant ancestors in the late 19th / early 20th century. Together we discuss their hopes and dreams, the struggles they faced and the various ways in which they were all too often exploited. What were the lives of working class women like? How did they change over ti…
 
A history of Britain's resurrection men. Suzie Lennox delves into the dark world of the body snatchers. Who were these criminals? How much was a body worth? How did they go about stealing the corpses? How worried were people about their loved ones remains? What theft prevention methods did people employ? Suzie answers all these questions and more! …
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login