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The New York Times reports that chatting on the telephone connected to a land-line during a thunderstorm can electrocute you, it is no urban legend. A bolt of lightning that strikes a telephone line can cause an electrical surge to shoot through the wires and enter a handset. The odds of this are relatively small, and most phone companies have prot…
 
The average annual snowfall in Philadelphia is slightly more than 22”. In April, Philly averages a half an inch of snow and there is measurable snow in April there only once every other year. 1841 was not so kind to Philadelphia. Unusual late season cold lingered for much of the month and a series of storms swept out of the Gulf of Mexico and up th…
 
On April 11, 1999 more than 3” of rain fell in Hong Kong during a cloudburst as heavy thunderstorms racked across the region. Streets were flooded and stores were forced to shut. The 3” of rain was more than Hong Kong had received in the first 3 months of 1999. As it turns out that is only half as much rain as is normal in Hong Kong from January to…
 
The winter of 1995-1996 in the Northern part of the United State just didn’t seem to want to end. Cold air lingered on well past the start of Spring. April was cold in that region of the country, especially New England and the first half of the month seemed more like winter than Spring. At the start of the second week of April temperatures were bel…
 
2020's Atlantic hurricane season was a busy one and AccuWeather's forecasters are anticipating another active season for 2021. On this week's episode, Dean DeVore is joined by AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist and hurricane expert, Dan Kottlowski to chat about AccuWeather's 2021 Atlantic hurricane season forecast. Check out the 2021 Atlantic Hurrica…
 
Tornadoes have been recorded on all continents except Antarctica. The United States has the most tornadoes of any country, as well as the strongest and most violent tornadoes. A large portion of these tornadoes form in an area of the central United States. Canada experiences the second most tornadoes in the world. Other areas of the globe that have…
 
In the early days of April 1938 arctic cold that had been building and bottled up in Alaska and the Yukon came crashing southward along the east slopes of the Rocky Mountains. The wintry chill reached cities like Cheyenne and Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo and then smashed eastward enveloping Omaha, Wichita and finally Amarillo. The cold modif…
 
April 7, 1977 marked the first home game in the history of the Toronto Blue Jays. Actually, for a while, in February 1976 , it looked as if the National League’s San Francisco Giants would move to Toronto, where there were buyers eager for the club. When the Giants were sold in March 1976 to new owners determined to keep them in San Francisco, the …
 
April 6, 1936 , brought one of the worst weather-related disasters in Georgia history. A series of strong tornados struck the southern United States but none was deadlier than the one that struck Gainesville, Georgia on April 6 1936. It was part of a devastating outbreak of 17 tornadoes across the South. And it wasn’t the first for Gainesville - an…
 
The summer of 1816 was not like any summer people could remember. The National Center for Atmospheric Research reported that, snow fell in New England and gloomy, cold rains fell throughout Europe. It was cold and stormy and dark. 1816 became known in Europe and North America as “The Year Without a Summer.” The year before on April 5, 1815, Mount T…
 
In the 1930s, lighter than air ships, or dirigibles where the rage for long distance flight. Trans-ocean flight by airplanes was virtually impossible, especially as a passenger service. Planes would have to hop and skip from one re-fueling station to another across the north Atlantic. Long distance non-stop flight was still a way off not coming int…
 
The last few days of March 1974 and the first couple of days of April 1974 brought unseasonable warmth to much of the nation east of the Mississippi River. Across Ohio and northern Kentucky, the daffodils were blooming, and grass had turned a bright green, and, in some places, there was a hint of blue, that marks many types of grasses in Kentucky. …
 
The city of St. Louis, Missouri, is known as the “Gateway to the West.” It has this nickname because it was the starting point for the westward movement of people in the United States during the early to mid-1800s. It was a traveling hub for many settlers, hunters and others migrating west. The Gateway Arch now in St. Louis symbolizes the city’s ni…
 
It's the third episode of our Spring Series! This week host Dean DeVore welcomes Jonathan Porter, Senior Vice President, Weather Content & Forecast Operations & Chief Meteorologist to chat about how decision-makers can be better prepared when it comes to severe weather. Jon will also discuss AccuWeather's upcoming webinar 'Weatherproof your busines…
 
April snowfalls in the northeastern section of the United States are not unusual, but heavy snowfalls are rare. April snowfall totals average less than 5% of the season average in places like Boston. In fact, the normal snowfall in the month of April in Boston is less than 2”. In 1997 what would go into the books at the Great April Fools Day Snowst…
 
One of the earliest chronicled winter storms to strike upstate New York after the Revolution, was the strong system that impacted the region on March 31, 1807. The Herald in Cooperstown , NY reported, and I quote “The wind roared in the forests similar to the sound of the great cataract, the air was alternately filled with snow and transient gleams…
 
In the 1820’s and 1830s just after Maine became a state, after separating from Massachusetts, crop failures combined with cold weather caused some in New England to dream of warmer climates to the west. About this time Newspaperman Horace Greely was purported to have said “Go west, young man, and grow up with the country”? Many started the exodus f…
 
According to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, ice jams on bodies of water are caused by melting snow and ice in the springtime. Warm temperatures and spring rains cause snow and ice to melt very rapidly. All this extra water causes frozen rivers and streams to swell up, and the layer of ice on top of the river begins to br…
 
A strong storm developed in the southeastern United States on the 27th of March 2005 and grew even more dangerous as it moved up the East Coast on March 28th before moving out to sea off the New England Coast. Heavy rain fell across the Philadelphia and New York City metropolitan areas on the 28th and set the stage for a one-two punch of flooding w…
 
The prairies and plains of west central Canada, like those on the plains of the central United States are subject to wide swings of weather. Geographic barriers like mountains and large bodies of water can block or deflect even large-scale weather systems. Ocean temperatures and currents impact the track of storms. The influence of abnormally warm …
 
It's March Madness and it's our second episode of our Spring Series! This week we're joined by David Jones (@djoneshoop on Twitter) Columnist for PennLive.com and The Harrisburg Patriot-News to chat about the NCAA Basketball Tournament, COVID-19 in sports, and when things may return to normal. We continue to observe "National Weather Podcast Month"…
 
Late season Nor’easters in March are often times the most powerful storms to strike the northeast. On March 26, 2014 one such storm struck New England. The strong late season winter storm brought howling winds and heavy snow to Cape Cod, Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. Winds gusted as high as 82 mph on Nantucket, and more than 100 mph just off sho…
 
Tornado Alley is that area in the United States that has more tornados than anywhere else in the world. Stretching from central Texas to Eastern South Dakota. Tornados are more likely in Texas and Oklahoma in the Spring, and then they are more numerous in the northern plains in the summertime. Fed by the contrast between moist air from the Gulf of …
 
It had been fairly snowy across Kansas and Missouri in the 1911-1912 winter season. By the later stages of March, Kansas City already had recorded more than 40” of snow including 15” earlier in March alone. Average snowfall for an entire season is about 15” so the city already had well above it’s normal snowfall. Milder weather had made several att…
 
On March 23, 1913 the rain started falling across the Mid-west and it didn’t stop for 4 days and 4 nights. The deluge resulted in epic flooding unequaled in American history before and after. Known as the Great Flood. The storm system that produced the flood in late March 1913 began with a typical winter storm pattern, but developed characteristics…
 
The winter of 1935-1936 was a severe one with lower than normal temperatures in the eastern half of the United States. As of early March, it was estimated that the snowpack in Northern New England contained an average of about 7.5 inches of water – the equivalent of almost 100” of snow. Deep snow also covered the ground across Ohio, Pennsylvania an…
 
March 1868 started out relatively mild across the Eastern states. The winter of 1867-1868 had been a uniformly cold winter. Life was finally starting to get back to normal in the aftermath of the Civil War in the Northeastern states and the break in the winter, early in March was welcomed as the harbinger of an early spring. In the middle of the mo…
 
Often times wave patterns develop in the high atmosphere, the strongest winds in these waves are represented by the jet stream. These waves in the air, like waves in the ocean, have high and low points over time and space. From a geographical perspective the high point usually supports high pressure and the low points low pressure or storms. On the…
 
On March 19, 1958, Rain began falling along the eastern seaboard as a weak storm moved across the Ohio Valley. As that system approached the East Coast cold air was drawn into the storm from eastern Canada. The storm exploded. As it strengthened rapidly and the cold air was pulled southward all the way into the Mid-Atlantic states, the rain changed…
 
"Do what you will but not because you must" Spring is here and with that, it's the start of our Spring Series! This week, Dr. Liz Bentley, Chief Executive of the Royal Meteorological Society joins host Dean DeVore from England to discuss the 2021 'Weather Photographer of the Year' contest in which AccuWeather is once again a partner with RMets. Plu…
 
Early spring often brings the most violent weather to the nation’s midsection of the entire year. High in the atmosphere, up where the jet stream is, temperatures can still be almost as cold as they are in mid-winter, yet down on the ground temperatures can soar to at times close to summer-time levels. The extreme temperature contrast, that occurs …
 
On March 4 and into March 5, 1776 American forces moved the guns onto Dorchester Heights that overlooked Boston from the south. It gave the Colonials a commanding position that the British could not counter. But British General William Howe wanted to give it a go anyway, he gathered some of his force of 11,000 troops onto ships to cross Boston harb…
 
During the drought of the 1930s, un-anchored soil turned to dust, which the prevailing winds blew away in huge clouds that sometimes blackened the sky. These choking billows of dust were named "black blizzards". On March 15, 1935 one of the worst of these black blizzards, stuck Amarillo, Texas with Suffocating dust; 6 people died, many livestock st…
 
The term blizzard has found a significant spot in our language. A blizzard is officially defined as a storm with "considerable falling or blowing snow" and winds in excess of 35 mph with visibilities of less than 1/4 mile for at least 3 hours. The term has been applied to many snowstorms in American history, most notably the Blizzard of ’88. The te…
 
Records show that early settlers to what would become the Mid-Atlantic and New England states report of huge snowstorms dating back to the 1600s. Native American tales tell of deep snow and powerful winds from well before that time in the region. But modern city life and dense population was not yet established. By the 1880s though the population o…
 
The winter of 1989-1990 in the eastern 2/3rds of the nation had been brutal. November 1989 started mild in the western part of the nation, and a bit cooler in the East it was nothing out of the ordinary. The weather, however changed dramatically in late November. It turned very cold with frequent snowstorms in the central states and the east. In th…
 
Spring is just around the corner, and it's the final episode of our Winter Series! This week on "Everything Under the Sun", host, Dean DeVore takes you on a West to East coast tour, with a post-winter check in at three major US cities; San Francisco, Chicago, and Philadelphia. During our trip we will be joined by Drew Tuma (@DrewTumaABC7 on Twitter…
 
Tamarack, California sits up in the Sierras of that state at an elevation of 6,913 feet. Located just south of Reno and Lake Tahoe it is home to one of the premiere ski venues in the United States and even the world for that matter, and for good reason. Snowfall averages an incredible 443” a year. Because of its location in the high Serra it is pro…
 
Dust from the Sahara Desert in Africa is the main source of dust in the atmosphere on a yearly basis across the world. The dust has its origins principally in the remains of centuries old dry lake beds, mainly in the country of Chad. This dust is presentient and often times lifts into the low atmosphere creating a general haze across north central …
 
The Battle of the Monitor and Merrimack occurred on March 9, 1862,. It was the first battle between ironclad warships. The Northern-built Merrimack, a conventional steam frigate, had been salvaged by the Confederates from the Norfolk navy yard. With her upper hull cut away and armored with iron, this 263-foot improvisation that resembled, according…
 
Cold air had been holding across the Mid-west during the first week of March in 2008. Storms had been frequent in that region during that time, but none of them particularly strong. That changed on March 8, 2008. A major storm moving across the Tennessee Valley brought snow to the Midwest, strong thunderstorms to the Southeast and heavy rain and fl…
 
It was an active weather start to the month of March across the United States in 2017. But the most prominent event was a storm that moved out of the Rockies and into the Plains on March 7th. This system developed thunderstorms from southwest Minnesota to eastern Nebraska in the midafternoon of the 7th, then the system expanded from northeast Minne…
 
In early March of 1962 a massive storm developed along the Carolina capes, but instead of riding up and along the coast as usually occurs, that system was blocked by a large and building high pressure system over New England. The storm stalled and got stronger, the result was a strengthening pressure difference known as a pressure gradient, between…
 
What does a 30% chance of rain actually mean? Don’t overthink it, meteorologists say. This week on "Everything Under the Sun" we explore what "percentage of precipitation" means with AccuWeather Broadcast Meteorologist Geoff Cornish (@StormOfCorn on twitter). Geoff and host, Dean DeVore break down the term and what it means for you. Dean then welco…
 
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