show episodes
 
Get the biggest scoops and best storytelling on television from 60 Minutes - on your schedule. Now you can listen to the show in its entirety every week. 60 Minutes is the most successful broadcast in television history with more than 80 Emmys under its belt. 60 Minutes is also the only show to obtain interviews with every American president from Richard Nixon to Donald Trump.
 
Boy, politics really has gotten hideous, hasn’t it? And protests seem a lot more violent than they were a couple of years ago. Are things getting worse? Could the U.S.A be on the road to a second civil war? Robert Evans says ‘Yes!’ and by the time you’ve finished listening to ‘It Could Happen Here’, you will too.
 
Bringing you unfiltered public documents that deserve to be more accessible. Dan Williams, the voice behind the Mueller Report Audio podcast, reads some of the most important government documents for those who want the information, but may be too busy to read or simply want to do other things while consuming the information.
 
From prisons to protests, immigration to the environment, Peabody Award-winning Reveal goes deep into the pressing issues of our times. The Atlantic says “the experience of each episode is akin to a spoonful of sugar, even when it’s telling a story about Richard Spencer’s cotton farms or a man’s final days as a heroin addict.” Reveal is a project of The Center for Investigative Reporting and is co-produced with PRX. The show is hosted by Al Letson and partners with reporters and newsrooms ar ...
 
Each episode will go deep on a big story you’ll definitely want to hear more about. We’ll share with you our best investigations (think private prisons, electoral skullduggery, Dark Money, and Trump's Russia connections), and informative interviews with our reporters and newsmakers. We're hoping to make your week more informed with the stories that really matter, told by us, the folks you trust for smart, fearless reporting.
 
Do you find the news cycle overwhelming? Depressing? Confusing? Boring? Endless? Then you need The Quicky. Mamamia's daily podcast that gets you up to speed on the top stories, then deep dives on one topic you want to know more about. It's the easiest and most enjoyable way to get across the news every day.
 
The podcast version of a documentary & interview series on war and inequality from the heart of Empire hosted by Abby Martin. Empire Files is donor-funded, independent and add free. Help keep us going by becoming a patron at www.patreon.com/empirefiles. Follow: @EmpireFiles and @AbbyMartin Like: www.facebook.com/TheEmpireFiles
 
Get the biggest scoops and best storytelling on television from 60 Minutes - on your schedule. Now you can listen to the show in its entirety every week. 60 Minutes is the most successful broadcast in television history with more than 80 Emmys under its belt. 60 Minutes is also the only show to obtain interviews with every American president from Richard Nixon to Donald Trump.
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
Intelligence Squared is the world’s leading forum for debate and intelligent discussion. Live and online we take you to the heart of the issues that matter, in the company of some of the world’s sharpest minds and most exciting orators. Join the debate at www.intelligencesquared.com and download our weekly podcasts every Tuesday and Friday. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared.
 
In the war on terror, who is it that we’re really fighting? “Caliphate” follows Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The New York Times, on her quest to understand ISIS. For more information about the series, visit nytimes.com/caliphate. This series includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence. Producer: Andy Mills; Reporters: Rukmini Callimachi and Andy Mills; Managing Producer: Larissa Anderson; Editors: Wendy Dorr and Larissa Anderson; Associate Producer: Asthaa Cha ...
 
Deutsche Welle (DW) is Germany's international broadcaster and a trusted source for reliable news and information, providing content in 30 languages to audiences around the world via TV, radio and online. The flagship channel DW provides analysis and insights to viewers around the globe, reporting on important issues in English 24/7. Continuous news reports, special features and talk shows cover everything from business, science and politics to culture and sports, DW brings people closer to ...
 
A weekly discussion of current affairs in China with journalists, writers, academics, policy makers, business people and anyone with something compelling to say about the country that's reshaping the world. A SupChina production, hosted by Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn.
 
An award-winning, original, investigative series made by the team behind the acclaimed PBS documentary show, FRONTLINE. From the long and deadly arm of 9/11, to a police shooting in West Virginia with a startling twist, to what life is really like for children living in a Kenyan refugee camp, each episode follows a different reporter through an investigation that sometimes is years in the making. The FRONTLINE Dispatch – because some stories are meant to be heard. Produced at FRONTLINE’s hea ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
“To be born Indigenous means to be born into a struggle against big extraction and the same colonial forces that colonized Europe before they got to our shores,” says Chase Iron Eyes. Today, he joins us on the show along with fellow Native activists Gussie Lord and Frank Bibeau to share updates from their vital work protesting the Dakota Access Pip…
 
Katrina Adams, the youngest and first black person to become CEO, Chairperson and President of the United States Tennis Association, is a force both on the tennis court and in the boardroom. In her new book, "Own the Arena," she details how her experiences helped prepare her for leadership. NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker spoke with her about…
 
Before COVID-19 hit, millions of people annually visited Amsterdam's over 140 museums, including the Van Gogh Museum, which houses the iconic Sunflowers masterpiece. Since the pandemic, these museums have been closed. Special Correspondent Megan Thompson reports on the financial toll and how they are coping. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://w…
 
Vaccination efforts to fight the pandemic got another shot in the arm. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which is expected to rollout soon after the FDA nod, will speed up inoculations against COVID-19, but it might be a while before the efforts make a big difference. Kaiser Health News Correspondent Rachana Pradhan joins to discuss the vaccination ef…
 
New York was hit hard in the pandemic, and more than 29 000 died since the first outbreak there. Residents and workers saw a changed landscape – gone were the tourist throngs, and bustling streets – social distancing signs thinned out the crowds and demarcated the streets. Now the city is re-opening and the soul-searching has begun. But Nick Bryant…
 
Venezuela’s hospitals are dealing with a pandemic at a time when the country is already in an economic crisis. Many hospitals don’t have running water and there are shortages of oxygen and other medical supplies to treat Covid patients. Two doctors in the capital Caracas share their stories with host Nuala McGovern. In the United States, more than …
 
The U.S. House of Representatives is on the verge of passing a $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, even after Democrats suffered a setback on one of their key priorities, including a federal increase in the minimum wage. NewsHour's Daniel Bush joins Judy Woodruff with the latest on where things stand and what comes next. PBS NewsHour is supported by -…
 
In our news wrap Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is nearing approval of a third COVID vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson for emergency use as COVID cases begin rising. Also, more than 300 girls are missing in Nigeria after the latest school abduction, and NASA renamed its Washington headquarters in honor of the agency's first Black fem…
 
The last 24 hours have seen two major foreign policy developments. Overnight, the Biden administration launched its first known airstrike of Iranian-backed militias in Syria, and Friday, the U.S. intelligence community released a damning report tying Saudi Arabia's crown prince to the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Nick Schifrin joins Judy W…
 
This week marks a turning point at one of the nation's premier newspapers. Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron is stepping down on Sunday after eight years at the Post and more than four decades in the news business. His departure comes during a week when his paper won four George Polk Awards for its coverage. Baron joins Judy Woodruff to …
 
Marshaling the power of their office and the resources of the federal government to help Americans in the wake of a natural disaster is a key responsibility of a president. That brought President Biden on Friday to Texas, which is still recovering from a rare winter blast this month. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pb…
 
New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including passing a COVID relief bill without a minimum wage increase, the prospects for President Biden's Cabinet nominations, and the Conservative Political Action Conference. PBS NewsHour is supported by - htt…
 
The February pick for our 'Now Read This' book club was "Interior Chinatown," winner of the 2020 National Book Award. It's a funny and biting satire of stereotypes of Asian Americans in popular culture. The book's author, Charles Yu, also writes for television, including the HBO show, "Westworld." Jeffrey Brown spoke with Yu for our ongoing arts an…
 
On this episode, we speak with Governor Mark Gordon and one topic we talk about, what to do about education funding. Speaking of education, Deb Haaland's confirmation hearings were must-see TV for many young Indigenous people. The Powell School District is dealing with an influx of special education students. The administration is concerned about h…
 
On this week's CBS News "Weekend Roundup," we begin with the latest on the coronavirus pandemic. CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky warned states not to relax regulations because of an uptick in confirmed Covid-19 cases in recent days, despite weeks of declining cases and hospitalizations. We hear from CBS's Meg Oliver on the new variants popping u…
 
Zaron Burnett’s dad didn’t want slavery to be his son’s only image of Black people in American history. So every night, he filled Zaron’s dreams with these incredible stories of Black cowboys. Despite what Hollywood taught us, one-in-four cowboys were Black. Their stories tell a bigger, braver, more honest history of America. Find Black Cowboys on …
 
In this week's episode Marietje Schaake International Director of Policy at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Centre speaks to Carl Miller about Facebook's recent legal battle with Australia, Trump's deplatforming from Twitter and how we can preserve democracy and civil liberties in the age of Big Tech. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com…
 
The presidents of Turkey and Russia make an odd couple; their former empires have clashed over centuries. We look at the fragile—but nonetheless worrisome—alliance between Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan. India’s economy is recovering but a longstanding drag on growth persists: the overwhelming fraction of women absent from the labour force…
 
Over the last year, the Australian government has been waging a quiet war against Facebook and Google. Through a new law, it plans to force the big tech companies to pay news outlets in exchange for linking to their sites. Will this new law have the intended effect? Or will it set a dangerous precedent that cedes even more power over to the tech gi…
 
NATO awaits Joe Biden's Afghanistan plans - The EU imposes sanctions over Navalny - Will a Polish libel trial threaten future research on the Holocaust? - Some German schools reopen amid rising COVID infections - The UK's lockdown roadmap - Guilty plea in Daphne Caruana Galizia murder case - A night on the town, despite lockdown, in Kyiv - Investig…
 
On Sunday, Hollywood will celebrate the 78th annual Golden Globe Awards. The event is considered influential, even as it is dogged by persistent jokes that it's out of touch, and even corrupt. When this year's nominations were announced, many were puzzled that the fluffy Netflix series Emily in Paris received two nods, while the critically acclaime…
 
First, Kaunain Sheriff, who reports on health for the Indian Express (IE), talks about the next phase of the COVID-19 vaccination drive, who all will qualify for it, and the challenges the government will likely face. Next, Nandagopal Rajan, who writes on technology for IE, talks about Australia’s new media law, how it came about, and how it will a…
 
In our news wrap Thursday, President Biden says the U.S. is ahead of schedule on COVID vaccinations with more than 45 million people receiving at least one shot, the number of Americans filing new unemployment claims fell, supporters of Myanmar's military attacked protesters in Yangon, and Texas lawmakers began grilling CEOs from energy companies a…
 
More than 17 million Americans could see their income rise if the $15 minimum wage now in the COVID relief bill passes Congress. We hear from some of those who would be impacted by a minimum wage increase, and Stephanie Sy speaks with two economists with different perspectives on the topic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshou…
 
The sexual abuse scandal that has engulfed U.S. women's gymnastics took a new shocking turn on Thursday. Former U.S. Olympic gymnastics coach John Geddert died by suicide just hours after being charged with human trafficking and sexual assault. Christine Brennan, a sports reporter for USA Today who has covered Olympic sports for years, joins Judy W…
 
COVID-19 vaccines were developed with record-breaking speed, and by late last year they were rolled out to frontline health care workers across the country. But despite being first in line many of those workers have decided to delay getting the shot. Amna Nawaz reports on the critical effort to vaccinate America's health care professionals. PBS New…
 
During the pandemic, the federal government has tried to boost access to broadband internet. The Cares Act provided $150 billion to state and local governments, which many used to help extend connectivity, and the most recent stimulus package gave $7 billion in broadband funding. Yet many children in the U.S. still can't connect for class. John Yan…
 
Daily reports of disturbing racial incidents and what appear to be deepening racial divisions within the country leave many looking for answers. Special correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault recently spoke with Dr. Ronald Crutcher, a classical musician and president of the University of Richmond, about confronting the complexities of racism. PBS New…
 
Rare documents with 12 signatures of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. sold on Wednesday for more than $130,000. They were penned in an Alabama jail logbook after King was arrested in April 1963 for leading a march against racial segregation. Rikki Klaus reports on the unprecedented item. It's part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is…
 
In 1967, George Henderson and his family relocated to Norman, Oklahoma, where he became a professor at the University of Oklahoma. Up until that year, Norman was a sundown town that prohibited non-whites to be outside after dark and the Hendersons became the first African-American property owners there. He shares his Brief But Spectacular take on l…
 
This week on Sinica, Kaiser chats with Julie Klinger, an assistant professor at the University of Delaware’s Department of Geography and Spatial Sciences, about rare earths — a family of 17 elements that are essential to the function of modern industry and are indispensable in everyday technology. Julie debunks many of the myths surrounding China a…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login