show episodes
 
Time Sensitive is a podcast that features candid, revealing portraits of curious and courageous people in business, the arts, and beyond who have a distinct perspective on time. Co-hosts Spencer Bailey and Andrew Zuckerman respectively interview a leading mind who has made a profound impact in their field, contributed to the larger conversation, and is concerned with the planet we all share.
 
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show series
 
When Siri Hustvedt was 12 years old, she began reading 19th-century novels by Jane Austen, the Brontë sisters, Charles Dickens, and Mark Twain that were given to her by her Norwegian mother, and soon developed a passion for literature. She found great satisfaction in how these stories expanded her mind with new ideas and realms beyond. At 13, preco…
 
Wava Carpenter, the curatorial director of the Design Miami fair, speaks with us about what she’s doing to make Design Miami a potent platform for conversation, how the pandemic created an ideological shift in the design industry, and the age-old debate around what constitutes “art” versus “design.”By Spencer Bailey, Andrew Zuckerman, Wava Carpenter, The Slowdown
 
Bioacoustician and musician Bernie Krause, author of the new book “The Power of Tranquility in a Very Noisy World,” talks with us about quieting the mind by listening to nature, what he learned after losing his home and studio in a 2017 California wildfire, and his recordings of more than 100 species in their natural habitats for “The Great Animal …
 
Throughout his life, Daniel Humm has constantly pushed himself to the edge. So when Covid-19 arrived, he understood the importance of a quick pivot. Forced to close Eleven Madison Park—his three-Michelin-star Manhattan restaurant, named No. 1 in the world in 2017—he had to lay off all of his staff. Facing bankruptcy, Humm reflected on the many food…
 
Computer scientist and investor Kai-Fu Lee, co-author of the new book “A.I. 2041: Ten Visions For Our Future,” discusses reasons to remain optimistic about artificial intelligence, why minimizing routine work could make space for more creativity, and the powerful role that science fiction can play in inspiring STEM professionals.…
 
The poet, educator, and scholar Elizabeth Alexander, president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, views her work as an urgent political act. Following in the footsteps of her father, who was a civil rights advisor and special counsel to President Lyndon B. Johnson, Alexander has witnessed the sometimes exasperatingly slow pace of progress, particu…
 
Mathematician and professor Jordan Ellenberg, author of the book “Shape: The Hidden Geometry of Information, Biology, Strategy, Democracy, and Everything Else,” speaks with us about the limitations of logic, how math can help us develop mindful skepticism, and why gerrymandering is no longer visible to the naked eye.…
 
Artist and designer Debbie Millman has been fascinated by the power of branding for most of her life. And as the host of the Design Matters podcast (which was recently translated into a book, out next month) and chair of the School of Visual Arts’s Masters in Branding program, she constantly has branding on her mind. For Millman, part of the allure…
 
Activist, journalist, and academic Raj Patel, co-author of the new book “Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice,” discusses why corporations encourage people to make changes within themselves rather than within society, the consequences of treating nature as a cheap and infinite resource, and how external anxieties, from payday loans …
 
Penny Abeywardena, New York City’s Commissioner for International Affairs, speaks with us about how the Trump era provided an opportunity for community leadership to harness its governing power, why an entrepreneurial spirit can aid in developing public policy, and how the city is navigating various pandemic-related issues, including vaccination re…
 
There is a quite lengthy description of one of the cooler ideas explored in this episode below. Some links first:If you'd like to support these projects and help me continue making more:https://www.patreon.com/qwerkyscienceMy Twitter is here:https://twitter.com/BasicMoralityI think the main effect of interest with psychedelics could be disruption o…
 
For curator and scholar Glenn Adamson, craft isn’t a quirky hobby that sits on the outskirts of contemporary culture. Rather, it’s a vital, timeless tool for teaching us about one another, and about humanity as a whole. This belief fuels his writing, teaching, and curatorial projects, which seek to unpack the many ways in which the age-old activity…
 
Anthropologist and historian Josh Berson, author of the new book “The Human Scaffold: How Not to Design Your Way Out of a Climate Crisis,” talks with us about why design thinking often fails to result in actual anthropological work, how reconsidering what it means to be comfortable can help us find environmental solutions, and the relationship betw…
 
This episode is an exploration of dissociation as a general phenomenon of normal attention, trauma-induced dissociative responses, and the mechanisms of psychedelics & dissociative drugs.The article for this episode:https://mad.science.blog/2021/09/16/attention-as-the-mechanism-of-dissociation/If you'd like to support these projects and help me con…
 
Trevor Paglen aspires to see the unseen. The artist explores the act of looking through various angles—such as how artificial-intelligence systems have been trained to “see” and categorize the world, or the disquieting sense of being “watched” by a security camera—and creates scenarios that frequently implicate viewers in the experience. At other t…
 
Vanessa Barboni Hallik, founder and CEO of the fashion brand Another Tomorrow, speaks with us about building supply chains from scratch, how clothing resale marks a radical shift in how people think about fashion, and why the pandemic provides an opportunity to redefine luxury in terms of personal and planetary values.…
 
Polish-American architect Daniel Libeskind, who designed the original Ground Zero master plan at the World Trade Center site, talks with us about his personal experience of the 9/11 attacks; how architecture can serve as an instrument for healing; and why the Tree of Life Synagogue he’s redesigning in Pittsburgh, to memorialize victims of the 2018 …
 
When describing experiences, New York–based artist and author Maira Kalman almost always goes for the extremes: an instance can be at once stupid and smart, miserable and hopeful, sad and delighted. A bittersweet point of view forms the throughline of her work—which spans more than 30 books for adults and children, as well as performance, opera, fi…
 
Astrologer Alice Sparkly Kat, author of the new book “Postcolonial Astrology: Reading the Planets through Capital, Power, and Labor,” discusses the dual meanings of planets, the relationship between race and astrology, and why the practice is about making, not predicting, the future.By Alice Sparkly Kat, Andrew Zuckerman, The Slowdown, Spencer Bailey
 
Historian and speechwriter Jeff Shesol, author of the new book “Mercury Rising: John Glenn, John Kennedy, and the New Battleground of the Cold War,” speaks with us about how the space race of the 1950s and ’60s differs from the space flights of Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson happening today, the unresolved questions that fuel power struggles in Ame…
 
Artist Mary Mattingly talks with us about how “Public Water,” her current installation in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, exposes the various forms of the water crisis; the social, political, and economic mechanisms affecting clean water access; and the truths that tracing the origins of an object or a material can reveal.…
 
We explore addiction-based society, loneliness, conformity, and how the internet can help us escape our social boxes. In this episode, I also bring up some of my own personal experiences and how this shaped my life. This episode led to more interesting tangents than I expected so I'll likely do such brainstorms again! If you have questions, email m…
 
Forest ecologist Dr. Suzanne Simard, author of the new book “Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest,” discusses the consciousness of trees; how slow, selective logging can rejuvenate forests; and why being attuned to local ecosystems can lead to a better understanding of global biological communities.…
 
Andrew Zuckerman is a researcher at the Qualia Research Institute. He joins us to talk about his project aimed at studying subjective perception of the effects of various drugs like LSD, DMT, and THC. Isla Weber, from the Intercollegiate Psychedelics Network, joins as a cohost. Watch Andrew Zuckerman's video project here:https://youtu.be/M8hRWngvd-…
 
Pulitzer Prize–winning novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen, author of the new novel “The Committed,” speaks with us about how the term “the American dream” masks the nation’s colonial history, the importance of distinguishing between identity and ideology, and why the only new aspect of the recent violence and racist rhetoric directed toward Asian Americans…
 
Kevin Beasley thinks a lot about objects. In particular, specific objects that relate to notions of American-ness and Blackness—and ones that are often linked, subtly or not, with violence. Whether with a Cadillac Escalade, a pair of Air Jordans, or an N.F.L. helmet, Beasley finds deep connections to each item he chooses to work with, rigorously st…
 
A researcher studying traumatic brain injury and the potential use of psychedelics for TBI-related problems joins us today! Here we discuss the potential risks, benefits, and mechanisms of various drugs during discrete phases of TBIIf you'd like to support these projects and help me continue making more:https://www.patreon.com/qwerkyscienceVictor's…
 
Peter Adamson, host of the History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps podcast and professor of late ancient philosophy and Arabic philosophy at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, discusses stoicism, the dangers of rationalism, and the importance of understanding when to think for ourselves and when to seek expertise.…
 
Neurobiologist, author, and professor Stefano Mancuso, director of the International Laboratory of Plant Neurobiology in Florence, Italy, talks with us about embracing plants as a path toward planetary survival, humans as an invasive species, and why all living organisms deserve rights.By Spencer Bailey, Andrew Zuckerman, The Slowdown, Stefano Mancuso
 
Lili Chopra, the executive director of artistic programs at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, talks with us about the 2021 River to River Festival, the importance of integrating the creative community within a city’s urban fabric, and the role that the arts can play in rebuilding societies and envisioning the future.…
 
For Grammy Award–winning singer and songwriter Rosanne Cash, processing the past is a constant, endless journey. She’d been thinking about race and reparations long before the Movement for Black Lives gained momentum last year, as both racism and African-American ancestry exist in her family history rooted in the American South, where she was born …
 
Kathryn Garcia, New York City’s former sanitation commissioner and a Democrat currently running in the city’s 2021 mayoral race, discusses innovating by leveraging relationships of trust, holistic thinking as a tool to evolve municipal programs, and her plan to create “the most climate-forward city on earth.”…
 
Katherine is a medical student from Stanford who was also a winner in the recent PsychedelX competition. We chat about spirituality and psychosis. Haley Dourron joins us as a cohost as well!If you'd like to support these projects and help me continue making more:https://www.patreon.com/qwerkyscienceTwitter is here:https://twitter.com/BasicMorality…
 
Austrian-born, New York–based graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister talks with us about the media’s proclivity for negative news, why progress often stems from complexity, and how recognizing humanity’s historical long-term successes can help encourage a more rationally optimistic perspective.By Stefan Sagmeister, Andrew Zuckerman, The Slowdown, Spencer Bailey
 
Growing up in the 1950s in the only Chinese family in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey, Billie Tsien always felt like an outsider. She would seclude herself in the shower of her family’s home’s master bathroom, behind closed doors, escaping into books for hours before her parents, who had originally moved to America from Shanghai to study at Cornell, w…
 
Policy expert and equity advocate Ifeoma Ozoma, founder of the Santa Fe–based consulting firm Earthseed, discusses how companies use nondisclosure agreements as a means of ensuring indefinite constraint on their employees, the effects that the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements have had on the ways in which NDAs serve as corporate cover for il…
 
Austin Whitman, founder and CEO of the climate certification nonprofit Climate Neutral, talks with us about the economic benefits of helping brands reduce their environmental impacts, the difference between facts and strategy, and the importance of holding companies of all sizes accountable for offsetting and reducing their carbon emissions.…
 
For 37 years, Eileen Fisher has faithfully followed a vision: to create simple, timeless clothes for women that make it easy to get dressed. Soft-spoken, polite, and a self-described introvert, the 70-year-old Fisher is the unlikely CEO of an approximately $500 million fashion company that bears her name. The operation is owned by 42 percent of its…
 
The wonderful Manesh Girn appeared as a guest for this episode! He is known for his YouTube channel "The Psychedelic Scientist". We discuss various hot topics in the psychedelic research world and then later explore subjective experiences he's had. His channel:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCccafaIN6dwBwyl1cwNH90wIf you'd like to support these pr…
 
Doug Bierend, author of the new book “In Search of Mycotopia: Citizen Science, Fungi Fanatics, and the Untapped Potential of Mushrooms,” discusses using fungi to clean up pollutants, how mycology can guide conversations around the climate crisis, and mushrooms as a gateway to new ways of thinking about food, nature, and society.…
 
Kim Hastreiter, co-founder of Paper magazine and creator of the pop-up “public service” newspaper The New Now, speaks with us about her friends’ pandemic-induced workarounds, the importance of documenting history, and why New York City may be on the verge of a creative explosion.By Spencer Bailey, The Slowdown, Andrew Zuckerman, Kim Hastreiter
 
Come observe my cringey voice-acting in a dystopian short about the race to singularity and the hedonistic imperative. This was created a long time ago and now it has been updated for quality! I also created all of the music in this, which can be found on any music app by searching Gaej. Most of it is from the album Diality. Warning, this is dark. …
 
Last year, after more than three decades of practicing and teaching Ashtanga yoga, Eddie Stern found himself wondering if he should continue in the discipline. He’d amassed a considerable following through the classes of his New York yoga studios (with celebrity students such as Madonna; Gwyneth Paltrow; and Mike D, of the Beastie Boys), authored t…
 
This writer is one of the inspirations for the ideas in Flicker and Cognitive Atomization. We explore a ton of different psychedelic ideas about how they work, what they do, how this influences society, how perception works, and more!Psychedelics information theory:http://psychedelic-information-theory.com/Follow me:https://twitter.com/BasicMoralit…
 
Kevin Ronca has arrived as a guest! An eye-opening exploration of the way addiction shapes our lives and how this underlies the stability of our lives, yet also traps us in behavioral scripts. Our civilization is a system of addictive processes being exploited in both mutualistic and parasitic ways.Follow Kevin:https://twitter.com/ronca_kevinFollow…
 
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