show episodes
 
A 6-part docuseries from Conscious Communications in partnership with Cambridge 2030, Cambridge – in pursuit of equality, shines a light on why Cambridge has been named Britain’s most unequal city for the past two years and what people think can be done about it. Hear from the people on the front line in the community, from teachers to foodbank volunteers, and those taking action to create a more equal and inclusive city, one where everyone can live happier, healthier lives.
 
Hear ye, hear ye! This is Royally Obsessed, the podcast that discusses all things Royals! Roberta Fiorito and Rachel Bowie both write about the Royals for PureWow and, each week, they discuss the latest news coming out of Buckingham Palace, Kensington Palace and beyond. Follow the show on Instagram @RoyallyObsessedPodcast and like our Facebook group, Royally Obsessed.
 
There are positive things to say about both the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Sussex. Liking one does not mean hating the other. Both ladies deserve respect for the work that they do. Running alongside my “Kind thoughts for Meghan Markle” podcast, I will be relaying positive stories about the work and the lives of Kate, William and their three children, George, Charlotte and Louis. Kate’s role in the Royal Family has grown in importance since her marriage to William in 2011 as has ...
 
Established in 1978, MIT Enterprise Forum (MITEF) is one of the oldest entrepreneurial-support organizations in the world. These podcasts are produced by the Cambridge Chapter. The podcasts compliment the programs held in Cambridge, Massachusetts. These in-person programs bring together startup founders, investors, industry leaders, service providers, and the tech-curious to inform, connect and coach the early-stage technology entrepreneur.
 
The Social Ideas podcast shares the impact of social innovation, its necessity and its capacity to challenge the status quo. Throughout this series, highly committed change makers in business, civil society, policy and academia will talk about their work, their ideas and their motivation to strive towards to a more equitable and sustainable world.The Cambridge Centre for Social Innovation at Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, acts as a platform for research and engagem ...
 
Cambridge Life Competencies for Teens is a seven-part podcast series for English language teachers that helps you develop your students' life competencies to prepare them for early adulthood. In each episode we'll be chatting to English language teaching experts who'll be sharing their practical tips and techniques that you can use with your teenage learners.
 
For the internationalists of Cambridge, Massachussetts, periodically updated pods of super short visually packed filmed editorial stories from around the globe, that give glimpses of modern design, cutting edge emerging entrepreneurs, cultural happenings and global affairs, inspired by or edited from the cinematic essays found in the critically acclaimed EDITION29 tablet magazines.
 
Headstand is a music and spoken word show broadcast on Cambridge's community radio station Cambridge 105. The show airs on 105 FM in Cambridge every other Sunday from 9-10pm and programmes are available via this podcast shortly after. Anyone interested in getting involved in the show or community radio in Cambridge is welcome to get in touch.
 
El podcast de Amigos Ingleses. Phillip e Isabel, un inglés y una madrileña tienen muchas ganas de enseñarte inglés. Hace años abrieron su canal de YouTube en el que enseñan inglés de la forma más entretenida. Escucha las conversaciones en inglés de Phillip e Isabel de varios temas y aprende de la cultura inglesa, la gente y el idioma de una manera natural y interesante. Escúchanos en el metro, en el coche o en el gimnasio. Aprenderás vocabulario, frases, dichos, gramática y mucho más.
 
What's the latest in science these days? How can scientific advances help improve our world? And what's it like to be a scientist, anyway? Every two weeks we delve into the intersections between science, technology, and society, featuring guest researchers who present a fresh perspective on their work, what goes on behind the scenes, and the latest developments in their fields. Transcripts available: www.bluesci.co.uk/category/podcast/ Brought to you by the Cambridge University Science Magaz ...
 
"Interactive" clearly spoken, oral exercises to train you to "speak" English correctly with short sentences to repeat, complete or transform; a variety of different topics or tasks targeted to different levels from A2 to C1; American accent. For grammar drills go to "QualityTime-ESL Podcasts". For exercises using song lyrics go to "5 Minute TOPs". For scripts, oral/written worksheets and more information visit our website. Questions and comments to: marianne@qualitytime-esl.com.
 
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show series
 
Hunger in Cambridge is systemic and pre-dates the pandemic. This winter, food banks are expecting to give out an emergency food parcel every 9 seconds. With thousands more now facing financial hardship, food banks have seen an increase in families who are “newly hungry”, who have been forced to use support services and claim benefits for the first …
 
Welcome to The Age of the Egyptians podcast series by Cambridge For Kids. This eighth episode looks at Egyptian Customs and Beliefs. Ancient Egyptians believed that each person's soul was immortal. In order for the soul to reach the afterlife a complex, traditional set of customs was required, sometimes ending with mummification. If these rites wer…
 
The Idea of Development in Africa: A History (Cambridge UP, 2020) challenges prevailing international development discourses about the continent, by tracing the history of ideas, practices, and 'problems' of development used in Africa. In doing so, it offers an innovative approach to examining the history and culture of development through the lens…
 
One day I was reading a review of a Meghan and Harry podcast. The review read as follows: Why if you love Harry and Meghan must you hate William and Kate? Why should we not like both Meghan and Kate, or at least if not like then both equally then at least show some respect to both Kate and Meghan, for the important work that these women do? So, thi…
 
CAMBRIDGE CUBAN SALSA PODCAST recorded on 30/12/2020. HAPPY NEW YEAR 2021! :-D Thank you for listening. Please subscribe! :-D LIVE - recording every Wednesday from 22:00 London time onZoom: https://zoom.us/j/7870696407?pwd=RDNOYkZmaTBuYmNUUFZLUVdTYWtyZz09Our Salsa Soul Radio: https://oursalsasoul.comMixcloud: https://www.mixcloud.com/djsacha_mixclo…
 
This week on The Best of Car Talk, is Phil's Buick Roadmaster making noise because of a steering problem or because he needs to make 20-point turns to navigate the narrow streets of Our Fair City? Elsewhere, Fred doesn't know whether he should listen to his mechanic or his FSTB (Future Son-in-Law To Be) on how to start the Alfa that's been sitting …
 
Long before people identified as transgender or lesbian, there were female husbands and the women who loved them. Female husbands - people assigned female who transed gender, lived as men, and married women - were true queer pioneers. Moving deftly from the colonial era to just before the First World War, Jen Manion uncovers the riveting and very p…
 
Paul Sutherland, himself a poet, interprets works from the Psalms, Daoist Poetry and Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat. Enjoy as of Sutherland as he takes us through these select samples of sacred poetry.---Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/CMC_CambridgeLike us on Facebook: www.fb.com/cambridgemuslimcollegeSubscribe to our mailing list: eepurl.com/8cdif© Cam…
 
This week, Pastor Darrell Bierman talks about the shepherds and their angelic visitors. What an honour it must have been to be an angel selected to be part of this group proclaiming the birth of the saviour of mankind! Music: Offering Music: Royalty-free music provided by bensound.com Worship Song: "O Come Emmanuel" words adapted by John Mason Neal…
 
This week on The Best of Car Talk, Peterson is afraid to put air in his tires. Is he doomed to depending on the kindness of strangers with pumps, or can Tom and Ray help cure him—or at least outfit him properly in case there is an explosion? Elsewhere, towing may be Dave's best option for transporting his beloved LeMans cross-country, because the c…
 
Kate and William were back at work after their Christmas break, checking in by video conference with front line support workers who have accessed services from the UK mental health service organization Our Frontline. https://www.mentalhealthatwork.org.uk/ourfrontline/ As the name suggests, the Our Frontline organization helps to make sure that fron…
 
In this interview, I talk with Dora Zhang, associate professor of English and comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley, about her book Strange Likeness: Description in the Modernist Novel, published by the University of Chicago Press in 2020. While description has been “near universally devalued” in literary thinking, and pa…
 
Cambodia’s troubled history has often been depicted in terms of conflict, trauma and tussles between great powers. In Disturbed Forests, Fragmented Memories: Jarai and Other Lives in the Cambodian Highlands (U Washington Press, 2020), Jonathan Padwe assembles this history from narrative pieces by and of the Jarai, an ethnic minority living in the c…
 
Practiceopolis: Stories from the Architectural Profession (Routledge, 2020) is a graphic novel about the contemporary architectural profession, in which it acts as the protagonist in the form of an imaginary city called Practiceopolis. The novel narrates quasi-realistic stories that exaggerate the architectural everyday and the tacit, in order to m…
 
How can multiple theoretical approaches yield a better understanding of international political politics? In Understanding and Explaining the Iranian Nuclear 'Crisis': Theoretical Approaches (Lexington Books, 2020), Dr. Halit M. E. Tagma, assistant professor in the department of politics and international affairs at Northern Arizona University and …
 
Teaching in Times of Crisis: Applying Comparative Literature in the Classroom (Routledge, 2021) explores how comparative methods, which are instrumental in reading and teaching works of literature from around the world, also provide us with tools to dissect and engage the moments of crises that permeate our contemporary political realities. The boo…
 
The Holy Spirit: Theology for the People of God (B&H Academic, 2020) analyzes the Holy Spirit through the lens of both biblical and systematic theology. Dr. Gregg Allison and Dr. Andreas Köstenberger provide a comprehensive look at the third person of the Trinity as revealed by Scripture, focusing on eight central themes and assumptions. Dr. Gregg …
 
Translator Elisabeth Jaquette speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about four stories she translated from Arabic for Issue 19 of The Common magazine. These stories appear in a special portfolio of fiction from established and emerging Sudanese writers. In this conversation, Jaquette talks about the delights and difficulties of translating from A…
 
Today I talked to Rachel Berenson Perry about her book The Life and Art of Felrath Hines: From Dark to Light (Indiana University Press, 2019). Felrath Hines (1913–1993), the first African American man to become a professional conservator for the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, was born and raised in the segregated Midwest. Leaving their home…
 
For more than four decades, Bruce Lawrence’s multivalent and fulsomely prolific scholarship has influenced and imprinted the Western study of Islam and Religious Studies more broadly in singularly profound ways. The Bruce B. Lawrence Reader: Islam Beyond Borders (Duke UP, 2021) edited and executed by Ali Altaf Mian brings together major texts and f…
 
The tradition of political liberalism has a long and complicated history, filled with twists, turns, critiques and responses that have filled books, essays and lectures for several centuries now. Questions of the importance and limitations of individual rights and how to balance different interests have produced no shortage of theoretical conflict …
 
The tradition of political liberalism has a long and complicated history, filled with twists, turns, critiques and responses that have filled books, essays and lectures for several centuries now. Questions of the importance and limitations of individual rights and how to balance different interests have produced no shortage of theoretical conflict …
 
The life of Francisco Goya (1746–1828) coincided with an age of transformation in Spanish history that brought upheavals in the country’s politics and at the court which Goya served, changes in society, the devastation of the Iberian Peninsula in the war against Napoleon, and an ensuing period of political instability. In this revelatory biography,…
 
Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family (Columbia UP, 2019) tells the story of one Harlem family across three generations, connecting its journey to the historical and social forces that transformed Harlem over the past century. Bruce D. Haynes and Syma Solovitch capture the tides of change that pushed blacks forward through the…
 
Lovely listeners: we hope you're hangin' in there after a very tough start to 2021. But, good news: We have a fun episode for you. The Queen and Prince Philip get the jab, Kate turns 39 and Lady Rachel and Lady Roberta are joined by Bryan Kozlowski, author of "Long Live the Queen: 23 Rules for Living from Britain's Longest-Reigning Monarch," to cha…
 
The “diva” is a common trope when we talk about culture. We normally think of the diva as a Western construction: the opera singer, the Broadway actress, the movie star. A woman of outstanding talent, whose personality and ability are both larger-than-life. But the truth is throughout history, many cultures have featured spaces for strong female ar…
 
Melissa Michelson and Brian Harrison, co-authors of the book Listen, We Need to Talk: How to Change Attitudes about LGBT Rights (Oxford University Press, 2017), which focused on how people came to change their minds about same-sex marriage and LGBT rights, examine their thesis from the previous research to determine if it is applicable to transgend…
 
Much is known about the Qing sartorial regulations and how the Qing conquerors forced Han Chinese males to adopt Manchu hairstyle and clothing. But what happened on the stage? What did Qing performers wear, not only when they performed as characters in the Han past, but also when they appeared as subjects in the Manchu present? Reading dramatic wor…
 
Today I talked to Chris Hamby about his book Soul Full of Coal Dust: The True Story of an Epic Battle for Justice (Little Brown, 2020). Hamby looks into why there has been a surge in black-lung disease in West Virginia and elsewhere in recent years. Poor self-policing and rapacious business practices go a long way in explaining the upsurge. Add in …
 
The first chapter of Rebecca Roanhorse’s new novel, Black Sun (Gallery/Saga Press, 2020), features a mother and child sharing a tender moment that takes an unexpected turn, ending in violence. It’s a powerful beginning to a story whose characters struggle with the legacies of family expectations, historical trauma, and myth. These three strands are…
 
The “diva” is a common trope when we talk about culture. We normally think of the diva as a Western construction: the opera singer, the Broadway actress, the movie star. A woman of outstanding talent, whose personality and ability are both larger-than-life. But the truth is throughout history, many cultures have featured spaces for strong female ar…
 
As Donald Trump's presidency draws to a close, his opponents give thanks that he never developed a strategy or learned to use his powers and agencies efficiently. If he had, like Hungary's four-term prime minister Viktor Orbán, Trump could have created an "illiberal democracy" - a country with democratic trappings but with a charismatic, nationalis…
 
Melissa Michelson and Brian Harrison, co-authors of the book Listen, We Need to Talk: How to Change Attitudes about LGBT Rights (Oxford University Press, 2017), which focused on how people came to change their minds about same-sex marriage and LGBT rights, examine their thesis from the previous research to determine if it is applicable to transgend…
 
In Creativity in Tokyo: Revitalizing a Mature City (Palgrave, 2020), Heide Imai and Matjaz Ursic focues on overlooked contextual factors that constitute the urban creative climate or innovative urban milieu in contemporary cities. Filled with reflections based on interviews with a diverse range of creative actors in various local neighborhoods in T…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@…
 
I think this is the fifth time I've interviewed John K. Roth for the podcast (and the second for Carol Rittner). He has always been relentlessly realistic about the challenges, intellectual, practical and emotional, that Holocaust Studies poses. Advancing Holocaust Studies (Routledge, 2020), however, reads differently. Published in a world wracked …
 
When Mike Anthony moved to New York City to become an actor, he’d imagined being under the bright lights of Broadway, living a life full of fame and fortune. Instead, he took a job not on stage for a Broadway show, but behind its bar, and found a life full of meaning. In Life at Hamilton: Sometimes You Throw Away Your Shot, Only to Find Your Story …
 
Is color a phenomenon of science or a thing of art? Over the years, color has dazzled, enhanced, and clarified the world we see, embraced through the experimental palettes of painting, the advent of the color photograph, Technicolor pictures, color printing, on and on, a vivid and vibrant celebrated continuum. These turns to represent reality in “l…
 
The Idea of Development in Africa: A History (Cambridge UP, 2020) challenges prevailing international development discourses about the continent, by tracing the history of ideas, practices, and 'problems' of development used in Africa. In doing so, it offers an innovative approach to examining the history and culture of development through the lens…
 
When European powers carved political borders across the Middle East following World War I, a curious event in the international drug trade occurred: Palestine became the most important hashish waystation in the region and a thriving market for consumption. British and French colonial authorities utterly failed to control the illicit trade, raising…
 
Marion Nestle describes her new book as “a small, quick and dirty reader for the general audience” summarizing some of her biggest and most influential works. Let’s Ask Marion: What You Need to Know About the Politics of Food, Nutrition, and Health published September 2020 by University of California Press, was written in conversation with Kerry Tr…
 
Rachel Silberstein’s book A Fashionable Century: Textile Artistry and Commerce in the Late Qing (University of Washington Press, 2020) reveals how Qing fashion was produced at the intersection of commerce and culture. Drawing on a wide array of visual and textual sources, from pattern books and gazetteers to embroidered jackets and a sample book of…
 
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