show episodes
 
Stories about how literature sounds. SpokenWeb is a monthly podcast that shares stories from the audio archives of Canadian literary history. Drawing on Canadian literary archival recordings from across Canada, episodes are snapshots of Canadian literary history and contemporary responses to it, including interviews, panel discussions, lectures, readings, and audio essays.
 
Parallel Careers is a monthly podcast about the dual lives of writers who teach. Few writers make their living from publication alone; many fill the gaps with teaching in both academic and community settings. Much of the work is precarious, and there are few opportunities for professional development. The podcast features writers with diverse practices and points of view—writers who are at the top of their game in both craft and pedagogy. Tune in to hear the big ideas and practical tips they ...
 
Need something new to talk about? Subscribe to the podcast that challenges the way you see everything in ten minutes or less. The Walrus Talks is a national event series that sparks conversations on the issues that matter most to Canadians. *The music in this podcast has been licensed and is called Intelligent Molecule by LexPremium. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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Lexitecture

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Lexitecture

Ryan Paulsen and Amy Hanlon

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A Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) talking about the words in the English language that fascinate them most at the moment, looking at their histories and origins and trying to piece together just how they got to where they are today. This is a podcast for anyone interested in etymology (the study of words and their origins/history). If you've ever found yourself happier after discovering some bizarre bit of trivia about a word that you hadn't even given a second thought to (such as how the w ...
 
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Endnote

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Endnote

Hart House Literary and Library Committee

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Every other Friday, join Alexander Lynch, Sabryna Ekstein, Marta Anielska, Meixi Zhang, and the Hart House Literary and Library Committee (HHLLC) as they talk about the big ideas in literature with University of Toronto professors and Canadian authors, showcase emerging authors from around the Hart House community, and chat about the books they love. We also feature recordings from HHLLC panels and workshops. Whether you’re a casual reader or a devoted bibliophile, this is the podcast for you!
 
A tale of mystery, romance, and honor, as David Carrigan must choose between his duty as an officer of the law and a girl who holds him captive; a girl who Carrigan thinks he may have fallen in love with no less! Who is this strange girl Jean-Marie, and why won’t she give him his freedom? And who are the people that she surrounds herself with along the great Canadian rivers and wilderness barrens and forests of the northwest?
 
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Reading West

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Reading West

Lisa Guenther: Author, reader, and journalist

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This podcast features Western Canadian authors reading from their novels, short fiction, poetry, memoirs, or non-fiction. It is created and hosted by Saskatchewan novelist Lisa Guenther. Reading West features published authors from B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. For the most part, the podcast focuses on literature (contemporary CanLit), but writers working in other genres are welcome.
 
James Curwood wrote many adventures of the far north. By 1909 he had saved enough money to travel to the Canadian northwest, a trip that provided the inspiration for his wilderness adventure stories. The success of his novels afforded him the opportunity to return to the Yukon and Alaska for several months each year that allowed him to write more than thirty such books. The Canadian North is often referred to as “God’s Country” God’s Country is a tale of adventure, mystery and romance!
 
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semi-prose

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semi-prose

Penguin Random House Canada

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semi-prose is the books podcast that’s half as serious and twice as smart as your other favourite books podcast. Join Evan, Allie, Kristina, and Max: four semi-professional readers as they explore new Canadian books through their personal histories, stores of pop culture, and readerly curiosities, before the pros – the authors themselves – join the conversation. Because when you’re done the last page, you’ve only really read the half of it.
 
The Last of the Mohicans is an epic novel by James Fenimore Cooper, first published in January 1826.It was one of the most popular English-language novels of its time, and helped establish Cooper as one of the first world-famous American writers.The story takes place in 1757 during the French and Indian War, when France and Great Britain battled for control of the American and Canadian colonies. During this war, the French often allied themselves with Native American tribes in order to gain ...
 
Further Chronicles of Avonlea is a collection of short stories by L.M. Montgomery and is a sequel to Chronicles of Avonlea. Published in 1920, it includes a number of stories relating to the inhabitants of the fictional Canadian village of Avonlea and its region, located on Prince Edward Island. The book was published without the permission of L.M. Montgomery, and was formed from stories she had decided not to publish in the earlier Chronicles of Avonlea. Montgomery sued her publishers, L.C. ...
 
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Two Bits

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Two Bits

American Numismatic Association

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Welcome to Two Bits, the American Numismatic Association’s podcast about the wonderful world of coins and currency. Enjoy wide-ranging discussions about numismatics, in a fun and engaging way. Host Doug Mudd has collected coins since the age of 10 and is currently interested in ancient coins, modern paper money, WWI and pre-19th century medals and coins. He was Collection Manager for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Numismatic Collection from 1991 to 2004 and has been the curator of th ...
 
8 great spoofs of 'types' of fiction by the premier Canadian humorist Leacock, taken from his book Nonsense Novels. The title of each parody gives away it's genre. Soaked in Seaweed or, Upset in the Ocean; Maddened by Mystery: or, The Defective Detective; "Q." A Psychic Pstory of the Psupernatural; Guido the Gimlet of Ghent: A Romance of Chivalry; The Man in Asbestos: an Allegory of the Future; Sorrows of a Super Soul: or, The Memoirs of Marie Mushenough; A Hero in Homespun: or, The Life Str ...
 
Frank Lucius Packard (February 2, 1877 – February 17, 1942) was a Canadian novelist born in Montreal, Quebec. He worked as a civil engineer on the Canadian Pacific Railway. He later wrote a series of mystery novels, the most famous of which featured a character called Jimmie Dale. Jimmie Dale is a wealthy playboy by day, with a Harvard education and membership to New York City’s ultra-exclusive private club St. James. But at night he puts on a costume and becomes The Grey Seal, who enters bu ...
 
Known as the Canadian Mark Twain, Stephen Leacock was a humorist whose gentle parodies and spoofs still evoke a smile and a chuckle more than a hundred years after they were first published. Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town was published in 1912. Set in the fictional town of Mariposa in Canada, which is peopled by a delightful assortment of characters, the book has proved to be an enduring classic in the humor genre. Readers around the world continue to enjoy these little stories about the ...
 
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show series
 
January 4 was World Braille Day and to celebrate we sat down to talk with Kerry Kijewski and Marcia Yale, two of the five authors of the study Improving Braille Availability in Canadian Public Libraries to learn more about the study and what the book industry can do to improve braille accessibility in Canada.Further reading/listening:-Improving Bra…
 
This ShortCuts episode responds to poet Daphne Marlatt’s conversation with Karis Shearer and Megan Butchart in the recent SpokenWeb Podcast episode “SoundBox Signals presents Performing the Archive.” By listening to audio from Marlatt’s previous archival performances, ShortCuts producer Katherine McLeod considers how we remember feelings attached t…
 
As Canadian children and their parents are once again confronted with the uncertainty of lockdowns and school closures, the mental health of our youngest community members is of concern. How will this affect them in the short-term? In the long-term? And will this contribute to a new intergenerational trauma? These questions become even more fraught…
 
In this episode, we look back at some of our favourite words, starting with Amy's exploration of "serendipity" from our very first episode ever! Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and talk about its origins, current use, and try to puzzle out how it may…
 
On our special, holiday edition of Book Club, Aayu Pandey, one of L&L’s equity and diversity officers, considers dystopia and the interrelation of life and death in Kurt Vonnegut’s “2 B R 0 2 B”; then, Meixi and Marta discuss labour, poverty, and capitalism in George Saunders’s “Sea Oak.” For the book list and transcript for this episode, visit hhl…
 
This month on the SpokenWeb Podcast, we are excited to share with you a special episode from our sister podcast Soundbox Signals. Host Karis Shearer, guest curator Megan Butchart, and poet Daphne Marlatt have a conversation about Daphne Marlatt's 1969 archival recording of leaf leaf/s and her experience of performing poetry with the archive in 2019…
 
According to Statistics Canada, being a person of faith, or at least admitting to being a person of faith is becoming less popular. That might just be about the ebb and flow of our culture, and history may cycle again to make religion popular again, but in the meantime, the places that were built at the height of “worship culture” sit in disrepair …
 
The BookNet staff recaps 2021 in terms of book sales in the Canadian market, BookNet staff reading habits, and all the other book news fit to share.Further reading/listening:- See this as a webinar on YouTube: https://youtu.be/j5Ef4vImS2o - Subject spotlight blog series: https://www.booknetcanada.ca/blog?tag=subject+spotlight - Backlist blog posts:…
 
As part two of ShortCuts 2.9 Situating Sound—and as one of the many remembrances of Stó:lō writer and activist Lee Maracle—this ShortCuts explores how the archive remembers and who these memories serve. The audio recording for this episode is a 1988 recording of Lee Maracle and Dionne Brand, recorded for broadcast on Gerry Gilbert’s radio program “…
 
In this episode, Amy becomes a woman of stories with "fabulous" and Ryan connects Wales, Patagonia and the Round Table with "penguin". Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and talk about its origins, current use, and try to puzzle out how it may have gone…
 
Immersing yourself in your subject is not a new concept. Actors do it. Engineers do it. Writers do it. But why is it important? According to wildlife photographer Kerri Martin, sometimes in pursuit of accurate representation, you can discover a deeper meaning in why you do what you do. And doing it in a conscious way has all kinds of benefits. See …
 
"Writing's my playground. So I feel very free. I feel, you know, we're in a world where there's not a lot of freedom. I feel like I'm free on the page." In this episode, Carrianne Leung challenges established ideas about craft and teaching, and shares how her writing aims to show the complexity and fullness of being human. She discusses: How her wo…
 
Forced Migration: Bison stories and what they can tell settlers about a past, present, and future on stolen land As uninvited guests on Indigenous land, we are continually told that national parks, and our conservation system in general, are a benevolent inheritance from our settler ancestors. The creators of parks and conservation societies crafte…
 
In this episode, Amy learns to blame the dog for being "feisty" and Ryan to dress himself with "tire". Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and talk about its origins, current use, and try to puzzle out how it may have gone from A to B. If you love thinki…
 
Alex speaks with Professors Simon Stern (UofT Law/English) and Adam Hammond (UofT English) about the detective fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle as it relates to their ongoing project, “The Birth of the Modern Detective Story, 1890–1920.” Key topics of discussion include the rise of the modern “inferential attitude,” the role of probability in detectiv…
 
There are days when it may seem like we have solved the diversity issue in the arts here in Canada. When you look around and you finally see Indigenous books winning the biggest awards, and Black poets sharing the stage with their literary peers it starts to feel like hope. But according to Devyani Saltzman, who has led programming at the Art Galle…
 
We sat down with Kiley Turner, 49th Shelf’s Managing Editor, to have a conversation about the work she and her colleagues do to promote Canadian books, the role metadata plays in discoverability and marketing, the ways publishing and non-publishing people can use 49th Shelf, and much more.Further reading:-49th Shelf website: https://49thshelf.com/-…
 
"I think with a poem, you always want to have something at stake that you just are not going to be able to answer, but you keep trying to get at it in this way, in that way, in this way." In this episode, Sheryda Warrener explores how poems anchor us in the world, the importance of making space for ritual, and how her students build material from s…
 
In this episode, ShortCuts explores one of the methods of listening from the previous episode of The SpokenWeb Podcast. That episode, produced by Julia Polyck O’Neill, listens to the emotional weight of archives. Julia’s conversations with poet Lisa Robertson uncover the ways in which archives record the relationships between memory, affect, and mo…
 
Alex speaks with Professor Daniel Wright of UofT English about two key popular romances, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Anthony Trollope’s Can You Forgive Her?, in the context of his book, Bad Logic: Reasoning About Desire in the Victorian Novel (2018). Key topics of discussion include the relationship between the realist and romance modes, the t…
 
Many of us have experienced isolation over the past 18 months, which has taken a toll on our collective mental health. During these restless times, it’s natural to fight the feelings of loneliness, grief, and sadness. But as mental health advocate Mark Henick has learned, these feelings can be an excellent teacher if we’re willing to just … sit wit…
 
In this episode, Ryan is all by his onesy, digging into the bag of listener suggestions and pulling out "manicure", "care", "pink", and "endeavour". Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each (normal) episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and talk about its origins, current use, and try to puzzle o…
 
When you think of the natural world, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? To some, it might be National Park forests, the Great Lakes, or the Rocky Mountains.Carly Ziter spoke about the ecosphere that often receives less attention: the one living within our cities. Carly Ziter is an assistant professor in the Department of Biology at Concordi…
 
In this episode, SpokenWeb contributor Julia Polyck-O’Neill shares an archived recording of Canadian poet Lisa Robertson with us and talks us through two interviews she recorded with Robertson. Polyck-O’Neill invites us to consider the significance of Robertson’s intimate archival collections in light of the relationships between archives, memory, …
 
A conversation with Fazeela Jiwa from Fernwood Publishing about sensitivity readers — what that term means, the shortcomings of using them, Fernwood’s approach, and what the future might have in store for sensitivity reading.Further reading:- Fernwood Publishing: https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/- Authenticy reading. Part 1: What editors need to know:…
 
"Writing is something that I really come at as a writer. And I think, like many writers, we all bring our, our lenses to what we write. Science--now I'm realizing more and more—it's a language, it's an entire language. Which, of course, has a culture associated with it as all languages do. And I bring that language and culture to my writing" In thi…
 
In this episode, Amy communicates in non-word noises with "vocable" and Ryan learns how Eldritch White Men ruin everything with "fetish". Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and talk about its origins, current use, and try to puzzle out how it may have g…
 
Vikram Nijhawan, L&L’s writer’s co-op coordinator, discusses metafictionality and the inextricable relation between fact and fantasy in Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman: Dream Country; then, Alexander Lynch, L&L’s podcast coordinator, examines representations of gender and of empire in James Joyce’s “The Dead.” For the book list and transcript for this ep…
 
Canada has a lot of work to do to improve relationships with Indigenous communities. But how will we get there as a country? According to Roberta Jamieson, the solution goes beyond charity. It requires philanthropy based on Indigenous reciprocity. Roberta Jamieson is a Mohawk woman from Six Nations of the Grand River, Ontario. She is the former pre…
 
ShortCuts is back! Season Three of ShortCuts begins with a listening exercise. We attune our ears to what it sounds like and feels like to hear archival clips ‘cut’ out of context. Join ShortCuts producer Katherine McLeod in this exploration of the sonic and affective place-making of ShortCuts as podcast. What kind of creative and critical work can…
 
In the midst of a pandemic, cancer remains one of the leading causes of death in Canada, so it makes sense that we have large laboratories for conducting cancer research. But according to Steve Shih, when it comes to building research facilities, bigger is not always better. This might be a moment (strategically) to think small. Shih is an Associat…
 
Today, we are welcoming you to Season 3 by reintroducing and replaying an episode that exemplifies what our podcast is all about. In January 2020, we released the episode “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Elizabeth Smart” created by researcher and producer Myra Bloom. To kick off this season, Hannah and Myra sat down for a new introductory conversation…
 
In this episode, we hit a momentous and arbitrary-base-10-numbering-system milestone of 100 episodes! Amy gets cheesy with "friend" and Ryan asks for a sub with "surrogate" but the REAL story is all the amazing people who contributed clips, and to whom we are extremely grateful: Mignon "Grammar Girl" Fogarty Mark and Aven from the Endless Knot Podc…
 
"I talk about speculative fiction in particular, as theory given characters and taken form. And so, rather than it just being like a theoretic concept out there somewhere, it becomes this very specific—here's a character that embodies this theory. Here's a world that embodies this theory. And then we play it out." In this episode, Derek Newman-Stil…
 
Alex introduces our new Dialogues theme, “Pop”—that is, popular literary and para-literary writing—c. 1850–1950. He discusses the main issues and questions we’ll consider; our genre selection; the social, economic, and political contexts of popular writing in this period; and some of our tentative theses. For the book list and transcript for this e…
 
Caring for a sick loved one is one of the hardest things a person can go through. But as Damian Rogers found out, it can also be an opportunity to learn how to live a more meaningful life. Damian Rogers is a poet, author, and teacher. She spoke at The Walrus Talks: Living Better in 2019. A transcript of this episode is available on our website. See…
 
We would love to hear your reactions and ideas to our stories. If you appreciate the podcast, leave us a rating and a comment on Apple Podcasts or say hi on our social media @SpokenWebCanada. Trailer Producers: Judith Burr & Hannah McGregor Clips Featured: KPFA recording of Robert Hogg reading at Berkeley Poetry Conference, 1965, from S2E10 “Robert…
 
In this episode, Amy finds a place to put her stuff with "apothecary" and Ryan takes care of a "curator". Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and talk about its origins, current use, and try to puzzle out how it may have gone from A to B. If you love thi…
 
Nationalism has become a bad word for many on the political spectrum, but according to Prerna Singh, it is a word people who believe in democracy should fight to take back from those who would use it to divide. It can be empowering. It can build nations and activate citizens. And most of all, it can motivate social change. Singh is a Mahatma Gandhi…
 
In this episode from The Podcast Studies Podcast, formerly known as the “New Aural Cultures” Podcast, co-hosts Dario Llinares and Lori Beckstead come on the SpokenWeb Podcast to take us back to key moments of their past episodes. They introduce three segments from past episodes that engage with podcasting in relation to media forms and cultural con…
 
In this episode, Amy thinks about signs and portents with "monster" Ryan discovers just how silly a silent 's' can be with "island". A huge shoutout of thanks to Tim and Thomas, our two newest Patreon supporters!! Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and …
 
Join Doug and Mitch for Part 2 of their numismatic literature roundup as they discuss more favorite works from overviews to deep dives. Find out how these great books can inform and inspire your collecting pursuits! Books discussed include: Ancient Coin Collecting (Volumes I to VI) by Wayne Sayles Vatican City Coins 1929-1979 by Peter Jencius Coins…
 
In this month’s episode, we give you a behind the scenes look at life as a BookNet staff member, aka a BookNetter. Join us for a chat with Project Manager Monique Mongeon, Product Coordinator Hannah Johnston, and Software Developers Ben Farrall and Madeleine Griggs to learn a bit about themselves and all about their work with us at BookNet Canada.F…
 
“When I think about teachers as gatekeepers, I think deeply about privilege and what our access to information and knowledge looks like. I recall a lot of the opportunities that have been offered to me came from a teacher just paying attention. And so when I think of gatekeeping at that smaller scale, it's also the teacher needing to pay attention …
 
Matthew Lee, one of L&L’s co-chairs, discusses family and agency in Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude; then, Hannah Koschanow, one of our literary contest coordinators, speaks on grief and community in Angeline Boulley’s Firekeeper’s Daughter. You can find the transcript for this episode at hhlitandlib.ca/endnote.…
 
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