show episodes
 
This American Life is a weekly public radio show, heard by 2.2 million people on more than 500 stations. Another 2.5 million people download the weekly podcast. It is hosted by Ira Glass, produced in collaboration with Chicago Public Media, delivered to stations by PRX The Public Radio Exchange, and has won all of the major broadcasting awards.
 
The best afternoon call-in talk program around Lake Michigan! Hosts Luis Perez and Shantell Jamison discuss current events and social justice issues, talk with local who's whos, and share stories. Luis and Shantell's 'real talk' and enthusiastic style coupled with a focus on personal narratives lead to engaging and frank conversations with callers and guests. Airs Mon-Fri 4-6pm Central on Vocalo 89.5 FM and Vocalo.org.
 
By the way, did you know that Vocalo collaborates with community partners to bring you voices and conversations you cannot hear anywhere else on public radio? Well, we do. We curate the best of these collaborations and present them to you here, as part of the ‘By the Way’ series on Vocalo 90.7 FM / 89.5 FM and Vocalo.org.
 
Coming to you live from Carter's Barbershop in Chicago's North Lawndale neighborhood, The Barber Shop Show brings you a weekly dose of real talk, straight from the shop floor. No punches are pulled and no topic is considered off-topic. Produced in partnership with the Chicago Reporter, and hosted by WBEZ’s Richard Steele. Airs every Sunday at 9am CST on Vocalo 91.1FM, 89.5 FM, and streams live on Vocalo.org. The show also airs on Sundays at 3pm on WBEZ, 91.5FM, and streams live on WBEZ.org.
 
The Paper Machete is a free, weekly “live magazine” covering pop culture, current events and American manners. Part spoken-word show, part vaudeville revue, The Paper Machete features comedians, journalists, storytellers and musical guests performing in the back room of a Chicago bar. The show was created and hosted by writer Christopher Piatt (pronounced like hot apple PIE-it). In June 2011 The Chicago Reader named The Paper Machete “Best Comedy Variety Show of 2011.” The Paper Machete podc ...
 
Live performances and interviews with emerging music artists and national touring acts that you won't hear anywhere else. Host Jesse Menendez moves beyond the typical "tell us about the album" interviews, bringing you real conversations with the people shaping the modern music scene in a variety of genres. Airs every Wednesday 8-9pm Central on Vocalo 89.5 FM and Vocalo.org.
 
Host Jonathan Groubert and WBEZ have teamed up to bring back the revered program, The State We're In. In Season 1 of this podcast reboot, you'll hear astonishing true and personal stories from all over the globe. The sonically beautiful, and narratively gripping "talkumentary" program brings you guests who will amaze you, break your heart or leave you laughing -- sometimes, all at once. If you're a fan of This American Life, or captivating storytelling in general, you'll want to be sure to s ...
 
With all the noise created by a 24/7 news cycle, it can be hard to really grasp what's going on in politics today. We provide a fresh perspective on the biggest political stories not through opinion and anecdotes, but rigorous scholarship, massive data sets and a deep knowledge of theory. Understand the political science beyond the headlines with Harris School of Public Policy Professors William Howell, Anthony Fowler and Wioletta Dziuda. Our show is part of the University of Chicago Podcast ...
 
The World Beyond the Headlines series is a collaborative project of the Center for International Studies, the International House Global Voices Program, and the Seminary Co-op Bookstores and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Its aim is to bring scholars and journalists together to consider major international issues and how they are covered in the media.
 
science+art+journalism... Time is running out to rescue and repair the planet, climate scientists keep telling us. They say that soon fresh water will be more precious than gold. They warn that no one will be untouched. But is anyone really listening? In After Water, scientists, writers and journalists to peer into the future—100 years or more—and imagine when water scarcity is a dominant social issue. It’s a cosmic blend of art and science. Front and Center is funded by The Joyce Foundation ...
 
"New Arrivals" is Alaska Public Media's profiles of people who recently moved to Anchorage, one of the most diverse cities in the world. Every Tuesday, we meet a New Arrival from another country, another state, or another part of Alaska. The stories air at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesdays during Morning Edition here on KSKA, Alaska Public Media.
 
From COVID-19 and civil unrest to climate change, the election and beyond, explore the legal and policy challenges capturing the public interest. WilmerHale Partners John Walsh, a former Colorado United States Attorney, and Brendan McGuire, a former Assistant US Attorney in the Southern District of New York, provide a front-row seat to the events making headlines. In each episode, they’ll pass the mic to those with unique perspectives on the most challenging issues of the day.
 
GrEetiNgs fRom tHe GrAsSroOts! Welcome to Chicago's premiere grassroots media group. This season (23 Dec 2012 - 10 Feb 2013), we feature second season of Conversations from the Middle. Vibrant 30m discussions with about the working and middle class experiences, especially in the Chicago metropolis. The purpose of this not for profit group is to serve as a grassroots curator of narratives for social media broadcast.
 
Enjoy these audio recordings of free public lectures at the Art Institute of Chicago by the world's foremost and emerging artists and scholars. This podcast is brought to you by the Ancient Art Podcast and points to the original audio media at the Art Institute of Chicago's website. Access the original Art Institute lecture audio recordings at http://www.artic.edu/aic/multimedia/resource-type-multimedia/19. The Ancient Art Podcast is not affiliated with the Art Institute of Chicago. Visit th ...
 
Join hosts Scott Shafer and Marisa Lagos as they unpack the week in politics with a California perspective. Featuring interviews with reporters and other insiders involved in the craft of politics—including elected officials, candidates, pollsters, campaign managers, fundraisers, and other political players—Political Breakdown pulls back the curtain to offer an insider’s glimpse at how politics works today.
 
Unf*cking The Republic (UNFTR) is a series of audio essays on the grand American experiment lovingly curated and presented by a quasi-anonymous political writer. Each essay reflects on a singular topic that is generally misunderstood or purposely obfuscated by the so-called “powers that be.” As we know, history is written by the victors and can be perilously manufactured to favor destructive world views. These views become intractably ingrained in the public consciousness and pervert public ...
 
Bookings: EU / UK: booking@dbartists.net USA / Canada: chad.cohen@unitedtalent.com Brazil: eddie@wildsheepagency.com Promos: music(at)sirushood.com Biography: Sirus Hood Biography Sirus Hood is a French artist. Age 10, his love for House Music was at the time fed by his older friends, giving him mixtapes recorded in a legendary club in Algiers. Few years later, he moved to Paris, and started his DJ career age 18 when he purchased his first vinyl turntables. He quickly became a regular DJ at ...
 
Despite the latest new digital marketing technology, the fundamentals of good marketing haven’t changed a whole lot. At its core, we still need a solid strategy. And we still need to make human connections. That is The Heart of Marketing. Join hosts Jayme Soulati and John Gregory Olson for an informative and entertaining romp through the digital marketing world today. You get an insider view of a variety of topics to help you win customers and grow sales. Some of the topics we’ll cover inclu ...
 
Each week, your hosts--public radio veteran Stephan Cox, political science PhD candidate Chad Levinson, and Democratic strategist David Gershwin--unpack the week in politics and attempt to drill down through the chatter and into something that quite possibly resembles the truth. Born during the 16-month long national nightmare that is the 2016 Presidential election, the show continues to evolve, examining greater and deeper themes and threads across the political and cultural landscape. Step ...
 
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show series
 
How are peoples' ideas about languages, ways of speaking and expressive styles shaped by their social positions and values? How is difference, in language and in social life, made - and unmade? How and why are some differences persuasive as the basis for action, while other differences are ignored or erased? Written by two recognised authorities on…
 
Welcome to Cover Story, a podcast by New Books Network devoted to long form journalism. Today, we are talking to Texas-based writer Sarah Hepola. Hepola is most known from her brave writing about drinking and the 2015 bestselling memoir Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget. She's appeared on NPR’s Fresh Air and published in The New Yo…
 
Ideas about how to study and understand cultural history—particularly literature—are rapidly changing as new digital archives and tools for searching them become available. This is not the first information age, however, to challenge ideas about how and why we value literature and the role numbers might play in this process. The Values in Numbers: …
 
Investigating Intelligence is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and neuroscientist John Duncan, University of Cambridge, and examines fascinating questions in neuroscience such as: What is intelligence and what does IQ testing tell us? Can intelligence be measured and improved? What role does our frontal lobe play in ex…
 
Set in the eastern state of Odisha in a district known as the “Somalia of India,” Everyday State and Politics in India: Government in the Backyard in Kalahandi (Routledge 2018) studies a development project in a region iconic for development failure. Drawing on rich fieldwork with a watershed development project in district Kalahandi, anthropologis…
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
On this episode of the Economic and Business History channel I spoke with Dr. Chinmay Tumbe, Assistant Professor of Economics at the Indian Institute of Management. He was Alfred D Chandler Jr. International Visiting Scholar in Business History, Harvard Business School in 2018. Dr, Tumbe has published academic articles in Management and Organizatio…
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
Since 2004 the Malay-Muslim majority provinces in the border region of southern Thailand have been wracked by a violent insurgency. Over 7000 people have been killed and many thousands more injured. Currently 60,000 Thai security personnel are stationed in the region to conduct counter-insurgency operations. Another 80,000 people have been organize…
 
They look like us. Sound (mostly) like us. And they know everything about us. And yet, we know precious little about our best friends up north. That ends today, Unf*ckers. Today we cast our gaze upwards to honor our friends and allies from the Great White North. Our friends at Canadaland, the top independent political pod network in Canada, help gu…
 
While i find it pretty easy to recognize when i'm reading articles in complexity science, i've never been satisfied by definitions of complexity and related concepts. I'm not alone! Researchers' own attempts to define complex systems incorporate a mix of folk wisdom and fraught assumptions anchored to a menagerie of contested examples. The field wa…
 
The Science of Siren Songs: Stradivari Unveiled is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and master violinmaker and acoustician Joseph Curtin, recipient of a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. This in-depth conversation explores Curtin’s long quest to characterize the sound of a Stradivari violin and the rigorous series of d…
 
What Is Religious Authority?: Cultivating Islamic Communities in Indonesia (Princeton UP, 2021) by Ismail Fajrie Alatas draws on groundbreaking anthropological insights to provide a new understanding of Islamic religious authority, showing how religious leaders unite diverse aspects of life and contest differing Muslim perspectives to create distin…
 
With weeks until ballots are mailed out in California's September 14th gubernatorial recall election, Guy Marzorati and Katie Orr talk with Republican Assemblyman Kevin Kiley, one of the candidates vying to potentially replace Governor Gavin Newsom. Kiley shares how he would respond to the latest rise in COVID-19 cases, whether California should ch…
 
As we taste, chew, swallow, digest, and excrete, our foods transform us, while our eating, in its turn, affects the wider earthly environment. In Eating in Theory (Duke UP, 2021), Annemarie Mol takes inspiration from these transformative entanglements to rethink what it is to be human. Drawing on fieldwork at food conferences, research labs, health…
 
What do we really know about how and where religions began, and how they spread? Robin Derricourt considers the birth and growth of several major religions, using history and archaeology to recreate the times, places and societies that witnessed the rise of significant monotheistic faiths. Beginning with Mormonism and working backwards through Isla…
 
Hijras, one of India’s third gendered or trans populations, have been an enduring presence in the South Asian imagination—in myth, in ritual, and in everyday life, often associated in stigmatized forms with begging and sex work. In more recent years hijras have seen a degree of political emergence as a moral presence in Indian electoral politics, a…
 
The Mincing Rascals are John Williams of WGN Radio, Eric Zorn formerly of Chicago Tribune, Brandon Pope of WCIU and Heather Cherone of WTTW. They begin by discussing Simone Biles’ decision to remove herself from Olympics competitions and the backlash she’s received as a result. They go on to talk about the city’s current COVID protocols and the opt…
 
The ‘Two Cultures’ debate of the 1960s between C.P. Snow and F.R. Leavis is one of the most misunderstood intellectual disputes of the 20th century. Most people think that the debate only revolved around the notion that our society is characterized by a divide between two cultures – the arts or humanities on one hand, and the sciences on the other.…
 
The realities of race that continue to plague the United States have direct ties to anthropology. Anthropologists often imagine their discipline as inherently anti-racist and historically connected to social justice movements. But just how true is that? In Boasians at War: Anthropology, Race, and World War II (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) Anthony Haza…
 
Chicago seems relatively well positioned: far from the oceans, relatively northern, and built on a massive fresh water source. However, below the surface, the climate crisis is threatening—literally and figuratively—the very foundations that the city was built on. And it’s a battle being fought between the Great Lake, and the Great City.…
 
In Mapping Beyond Measure: Art, Cartography, and the Space of Global Modernity (U Nebraska Press, 2019), Simon Ferdinand analyzes diverse map-based works of painting, collage, film, walking performance, and digital drawing, made in Britain, Japan, the Netherlands, Ukraine, the United States, and the former Soviet Union, arguing that together they c…
 
When a billionaire yanked the plug on a pioneering Chicago digital news site, putting a large team of local reporters out of work, some of them banded together to start another digital news site—for themselves, and for the people of the city. Block Club Chicago editor-in-chief Shamus Toomey joins hosts Sheila Solomon and Charlie Meyerson for anothe…
 
Historian Eszter Varsa’s new book Protected Children, Regulated Mothers: Gender and the 'Gypsy Question' in State Care in Postwar Hungary, 1949–1956 (Central European UP, 2020) examines child protection in Stalinist Hungary as a part of twentieth-century East Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European history. Across the communist bloc, the prewar…
 
Philosophy of Brain is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and neurophilosopher Patricia Churchland, UC San Diego. Patricia Churchland has done extensive research in the fields of philosophy of neuroscience, philosophy of the mind and neuroethics. During this mind-stretching conversation Patricia explores how the brain wo…
 
In a world that purports to know more about the future than any before it, why do we still need speculation? Insubstantial speculations – from utopian thinking to high-risk stock gambles – often provoke backlash, even when they prove prophetic. Why does this hypothetical way of thinking generate such controversy? Gayle Rogers, author of Speculation…
 
The 1980s saw the peak of a moral panic over fantasy role-playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons. A coalition of moral entrepreneurs that included representatives from the Christian Right, the field of psychology, and law enforcement claimed that these games were not only psychologically dangerous but an occult religion masquerading as a game. …
 
The world is in a midst of a renewable energy revolution, with the price of utility scale photo-voltaic solar power falling by nearly 90% between 2009 and 2019, and the price of wind power falling by 70% during the same period. Annual global investment in renewable electricity generation assets is now more than double that for fossil fuel and nucle…
 
We recorded today’s episode right before a brief vacation so the team could get some rest and chill out for a bit. So, we’re running a special show today to highlight the lighter side of UNFTR: our inter-episode sketches. To guide you through our sketch journey is the one, the only Manny Faces. Catch you back next week for a regular episode, Unf*ck…
 
Distributing Condoms and Hope: The Racialized Politics of Youth Sexual Health (U California Press, 2020) is a feminist ethnographic account of how youth sexual health programs in the racially and economically stratified city of “Millerston” reproduce harm in the marginalized communities they are meant to serve. Chris Barcelos makes space for the st…
 
In Radiant Infrastructures: Media, Environment, and Cultures of Uncertainty (Duke UP, 2020), Rahul Mukherjee explores how the media coverage of nuclear power plants and cellular phone antennas in India—what he calls radiant infrastructures—creates environmental publics: groups of activists, scientists, and policy makers who use media to influence p…
 
Why do we find pervasive gender-based discrimination, exclusion and violence in India when the Indian constitution builds an inclusive democracy committed to gender equality? This is the puzzle that animates Natasha Behl’s book, Gendered Citizenship: Understanding Gendered Violence in Democratic India (Oxford University Press, 2019), but it is, as …
 
What influence can online and visual activism have on protest movements? With a wave of anti-establishment protests sweeping over East and Southeast Asia over the past couple of years, the online phenomenon of the #MilkTeaAlliance has gained increasing international recognition. In this episode of the Nordic Asia Podcast Chiara Elisabeth Pecorari i…
 
What would it feel like to wake up inside the head of someone who writes about science for a living? John Horgan, acclaimed author of the bestseller The End of Science, answers that question in his genre-bending new book Pay Attention: Sex, Death, and Science (MIT Press, 2020), a stream-of-consciousness account of a day in the life of his alter ego…
 
The image most of us have of whalers includes harpoons and intentional trauma. Yet eating commercially caught seafood leads to whales' entanglement and slow death in rope and nets, and the global shipping routes that bring us readily available goods often lead to death by collision. We--all of us--are whalers, marine scientist and veterinarian Mich…
 
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