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Host Bruce Carlson reflects on 14 years of the podcast, provides a show update. Plus some listener questions on masks then and now, Presidents leaving (or not leaving) the Oval, and Kennedy's 1960 election and allegations of fraud.By Bruce Carlson
 
In this installment, Chris is joined by Sean Freeder to discuss the polling errors in the 2020 election, what it would take to be able to fully trust them again at this point, and the awfulness of Jaime Harrison, and the unrealistic expectations of the moderates in the Democratic Party Episode 490 By the way, if you want to donate to the show… http…
 
In this installment, Chris discusses a wide range of post-election thoughts, including: five reasons Trump lost the Presidency, the changing nature of the “battleground states” map, what “electability” means going forward, what the Democratic Party got right and wrong in this election cycle, reforming the Democratic primaries, the influence of the …
 
(Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images) In this installment, Chris is joined by Bruce Carlson of My History Can Beat Up Your Politics to discuss the 2020 Presidential Election results. They spend part of the episode placing Donald Trump’s defeat into a broader historical context. They also discuss what Joe Biden’s long history in politics can reveals abo…
 
We discuss the tight election that elected the first Democratic President in 25 years and some comparisons and contrasts to the current election. A President's umbrella, salutes for his "big foot," chain-armor clad parades, and the importance of a concern for the "general weal." all in this episode. Music by Stephan Siebert, About Life.…
 
In this installment, Chris is joined by Lindsay Duke to discuss the Lincoln Project’s appeal to the Democratic electorate, their relationship with the Party’s leadership, and what progressive and Leftists groups can learn from the Lincoln Project’s approach. Later in the show, Chris explains Congress’ constitutionally-provided powers when it comes …
 
'The public and the public papers have been much occupied lately in placing us in a point of opposition to each other. ' So wrote Jefferson to Adams about the 1796 Presidential Election, America's first with two candidates with true campaigns. The letter didn't reach its recipient, the opposing candidate of a party; the old friends became political…
 
Credit: Mindy Tucker In this installment, Chris is joined by Josh Johnson, comedian and writer for “The Daily Show,” and the host of “The Josh Johnson Show.” They have a freewheeling conversation that covers the election, the importance of branding in politics, a shared fear of possums, and whether the Trump Presidency has changed Josh’s approach t…
 
A candidate who didn't run for President. A candidate who ran, but didn't know he was running. A candidate who didn't want to run, but had no choice. A candidate who ran without seeming to run, and a candidate who ran but died before the votes were counted. An election that didn't happen, but would have been a humdinger if it did. A President who t…
 
Abraham Lincoln running against...Sam Houston? It is not a far-fetched idea that Abraham Lincoln might have faced Texas hero Sam Houston in the election of 1860, as he was under serious consideration to be one of the candidates in what became a four-way Presidential election of 1860. And he would have been a formidable one, except backroom candleli…
 
Jimmy Carter's speechwriter said "We were 30 points up, but unfortunately we had to campaign." A tight race turns to a veritable battle of gaffes between two newbie Presidential candidates. A surprise challenger and an unelected President. We go over the close '76 election, including a last-minute event that almost changed history.…
 
Truman's high-tech train, Dewey's We Go High optimism and the defeat that made him cling to it, Truman's risky calling of a Session of Congress and how it went badly for him in a few ways, and Dewey's decision to get angry, unfortunately first at an average citizen and only later at his opponent. This and other lesser-known stories of the 1948 Elec…
 
In this installment, Chris talks about the Amy Coney Barrett confirmation proceedings, the continuing issues that the aging leadership of the Democratic Party continues to generate, Sheldon Whitehouse’s outstanding presentation on how money gets dumped into the judiciary, and does his last Electoral College map for the 2020 cycle Episode 484 By the…
 
After the four TV debates between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy in 1960, there was talk of a fifth. That talk didn't result in another TV debate, but did provide one more campaign issue for a very tight election, and developed a new thing - TV debate negotiations. We look at 1960, the fifth debate talk, and other reasons besides the debates tha…
 
Why did we go to war in Iraq in 2003? What happened in the 18 months between 9/11 and March 2003 that drove that decision? What was it about George Bush and Tony Blair that meant war was in the cards? And what motivated these two men at the peak of their powers – with the world on their side – to pursue a war that would prove to be historically unp…
 
In this installment, Chris discusses Donald Trump’s tax returns, how “he’s just not worth it” and “nothing matters” are the exact wrong sentiments in the face of the challenges the impending 6-3 Conservative Supreme Court will create, and what we can all learn from the quiet wisdom of Bob Barker. Please spay and neuter your pets & support local spa…
 
The 1880 election was close, with Democrats and Republicans seeking an advantage in its waning days when a letter hits a major city newspaper purporting to be in the hand of a candidate. It is a letter that could turn the election. With Todd Arrington, a historian at the James A. Garfield National Historic Site in Mentor, Ohio, we discuss James A. …
 
In 1892, a dreaded disease caused a President to navigate local health situation and created a new law. We look at the precedent-setting quarantine order of the 23rd President, Benjamin Harrison. While we are at it, we look at Harrison's presidency, policies, his influence on future events, his failed attempt to obtain fair elections for both Afric…
 
The Democratic Convention in New York City in 1980 was not the example to follow for how to run a convention. With the help of "Reaganland" author and historian Rick Perlstein, we look at one of the most frustrating modern conventions. The fight between Ted Kennedy and Carter for the nomination, obscure rules challenges, delegates cajoled by genera…
 
The convention that nominated then-unknown Jimmy Carter in 1976 convention was worth 30 percentage points in the polls, and is seen as one of the best organized events by many who study politics. We look at what happened - from a strict chairman's gavel to a secret VP pick, from expert badge distribution to garbage cleanup, Along with possibly bugg…
 
We know Jefferson and Franklin, but what about the other signers - John Hart, John Penn, William Williams, Richard Stockton, William Whipple, John Morgan, William Floyd, George Read and others. I released this series as its own podcast in 2012, some listeners may have listened to it. I have combined it into one volume.…
 
High political stakes, secret plots, Plug Uglies armed with sharp awls to help 'convince' voters... Baltimore in the 1850's was a fearsome place where politics and gangs were hard to separate. Yet it was the connecting stop for new Presidents and Union Soldiers getting to Washington D.C. We speak with Josh Mensch. Josh is the co-author with Brad Me…
 
Newark N.J. suffered a brutal and consuming riot, or rebellion, depending on how you see things, in the hot summer of 1967. Through the voices of history, we hear about those events, what caused it, and the musician who got caught up and became an unlikely spark. Caught off guard, police and National Guard and a scuffle became a war, some say outsi…
 
George Washington did not get a Cabinet as President. He created it. His precedents forged the institution and the President's relationship to the Executive Departments. Washington didn't fire a cabinet member, but he set the precedents in this area and in others. We are joined by Lindsay M. Chervinsky, a historian with the white house historian He…
 
What caused The Great Depression, did FDR do anything to fix it, and how does it compare to our recent recessions? A 2008 cast that holds up well...As events started to take shape in '08, , I remember sitting down in a park and scribbling the base of this podcast, with factoids thrown in later and stories from letters to the editors of newspapers o…
 
We talk about Idi Amin, Kim Jong-il and other despots with Scott Rank of History Unplugged Podcast. He joins us to talk about his book History's Nine Most Insane Rulers. We get into Amin's awful suppression of opposition, deportation of Indian and Pakistani Ugandans, and extra judicial killings. Other insane rulers were more amusing, and we talk ab…
 
We know that on May 4th, 1970, fifty years ago, four students were killed by the National Guard at Kent State in Ohio. What is not always known is everything that happened after that. Opinion wasn't universally with the slain students, the school had little interest in memorializing for decades, courts turned a blind eye, and the criminal justice s…
 
An unknown man in a forgotten office develops a number that makes and breaks Presidents. A poet turns his song towards a metal object. Two 19th century men tire themselves out making machines They can't know their work will one day put us on the Moon. And a man tries to invent an un-commerce, but may have built the 21st century economy instead. In …
 
When we aired this last year, the topic of commerce shutting down did not seem timely. Thus a re-run of our fourth of a series on American commerce, a look at three instances of when U.S. commerce was stopped seems appropriate. From an offensive war effort, to a bid for peace, to a management of peacetime. And we look at the effects of those interv…
 
A look at Truman,, the Marshall Plan and the 1948 Election. Why Truman thought he won, and why his opponent Dewey thought he ended up losing. How he pulled it off. With A.J. Baime, author of Dewey Beats Truman. This is A.J. Baime's second appearance on the podcast. Big national projects, big sacrifice and an incumbent President up for election all …
 
The last-minute bid of California Governor Jerry Brown to unseat Jimmy Carter's nomination raised a lot of questions about politics that are still present today. Should electability be a factor among primary voters? Can you out-new the new candidate? What time is the right time for candidates to 'get out' Should critics shut up to help a nominee in…
 
Big discussion with Chris Novembrino of Don't Worry About the Government Podcast. The Democratic campaign started with over 20 people but ended up in a retro pattern of two candidates by March, a virus has entered politics, an incumbent is up for re-election. What does it all mean?By Bruce Carlson
 
Five thousand people died in Philadelphia, then the capital of the United States in just a few months. Between August and November of 1793. Thousands of others, including the President, fled the city. Preachers told of sins coming to roost, while doctors looked to mercury and bloodletting. In this recast of a 2014 episode, we look at this epidemic …
 
We speak with Laura Spinney, science journalist and author of "Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World" and discuss the dreadful disease that claimed 50-100 million lives, more than the Great War that preceded it. The so-called 'Spanish Flu' caused global damage but also caused scientists to reflect and develop better scien…
 
A look at the first South Carolina primary in 1980 and its intended role at the time as a firewall for conservative politics. We also look at how disco sucked, Dylan went Christian and some events that happened at the same time, all unrelated but in their own way meaningful. Lee Rosevere's excellent Music for Podcasts featured on the episode.…
 
George Washington was highly influential in constructing a Constitution, but less so when it comes to the Bill of Rights. A few of them he even found unnecessary. We just don't know which ones. We talk about Washington's role in the convention, his influence on government and what clues he gave in his politics of silence.…
 
A stubborn impeached governor, odd caucus locations, real estate and politics. Bruce talks about the Iowa Caucus, how it works, changes in 2020, its history and influence and what things look like this year. Impeachment and the current universe of politics in the United States. He finds a silver lining in the whole impeachment discussion, and discu…
 
The Constitution contains two possible forms of presidential removal outside of election, one is the much-discussed impeachment process. The other is the 25th Amendment's fourth section. We discuss 25 Section 4 with Professor Brian C. Kalt, Professor of Law & Harold Norris Faculty Scholar at Michigan State University, including how the amendment wo…
 
The May 4, 1970 shootings at Kent State killed 4 students and wounded 9. Paula Stone Tucker was a student going through her work and studies on campus when she witnessed a historic event. We talk about Kent State, how the 4 days unfolded, and get Paula Stone Tucker's take on events. She is the author of the book Surviving a Kent State Memoir. We ar…
 
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