show episodes
 
Vol. I: The Colonial Period. Charles Austin Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first Greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interes ...
 
Every day, stories unfold that have no resolution. Unresolved is an investigative and immersive look at those stories, as host Micheal Whelan tries to determine why these stories - unsolved crimes and other unexplained phenomena - have no ending.
 
"The past is another country; they do things differently there." Inward Empire explores the role of ideas and ideology in American history -- how the surface of actions and events can be shaped by undercurrents of thought and belief. Accessible and thoroughly researched, each episode is a window into a world that is both profoundly foreign and strikingly similar to our own. Visit www.inwardempirepodcast.wordpress.com for pictures, maps, updates on the show, and more!
 
The world is more mysterious than most people are comfortable imagining. We cross paths with the mystical from time to time and may not even notice it. If we do, we quickly return to our usually mundane daily existence. But what if we not only acknowledged the unknown, we investigated it and spoke with those in the know? That’s what co-hosts Scott & Forrest, and their producer Tess Pfeifle do at Astonishing Legends. With the power of the well-vetted Astonishing Research Corps, they have acce ...
 
The accounts of oldtime child life gathered for this book are wholly unconscious and full of honesty and simplicity, not only from the attitude of the child, but from that of his parents, guardians, and friends. The records have been made from affectionate interest, not from scientific interest; no profound search has been made for motives or significance, but the proof they give of tenderness and affection in the family are beautiful to read and to know. - Summary taken from Foreword of book.
 
The Mises Institute, founded in 1982, is an educational institution devoted to advancing Austrian economics, freedom, and peace in the classical-liberal tradition. Our website offers many thousands of free books and thousands of hours of audio and video, along with the full run of rare journals, biographies, and bibliographies of great economists.
 
This podcast was developed as part of an elementary-level Clark County School District Teaching American History Grant. The three-year grant funds six modules per year with each module focusing on a different era of American history and a different pedagogical theme. This podcast focuses on Colonial America and Classroom Simulations. Participants in the grant are third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers in Clark County (the greater Las Vegas area), Nevada. Teaching scholars include Drs. Micha ...
 
The JuntoCast is a monthly podcast about early American history. Each episode features a roundtable discussion by academic historians, Ken Owen, Michael Hattem, Roy Rogers, and guest panelists, exploring a single aspect of early American history in depth. The JuntoCast brings the current knowledge of academic historians to a broad audience in an informal, conversational format that is intellectually engaging, educational, and entertaining.
 
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show series
 
In her stunning and conceptually adventurous new book Emotions and Colonial Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor (Oxford University Press, 2020), Margrit Pernau examines the varied and hugely consequential expressions of and normative investments in emotions in modern South Asian Muslim thought. By considering a wide array of sources…
 
Another installment with Carmen Reino form Anchor Pest Control. Carmen is one of the people we speak with often to bounce ideas off. When we want to try something new or hear another perspective, so in this episode you get to listen in as we ask questions to get us going and thriving in the residential market. The ability to share information and e…
 
The film 'Black Panther' offered an attractive view of an African nation untouched by slavery or colonialism. Unfortunately, the film offers a rather dubious counterfactual.Original article: https://mises.org/wire/myth-wakanda-how-hollywood-distorts-legacy-colonialismThis Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by M…
 
Bruce Gilley is professor of political science at Portland State University. Support TRIGGERnometry: Paypal: https://bit.ly/2Tnz8yq https://www.subscribestar.com/triggernometry https://www.patreon.com/triggerpod Find TRIGGERnometry on Social Media: https://twitter.com/triggerpod https://www.facebook.com/triggerpod https://www.instagram.com/triggerp…
 
Since its 2017 publication, Ben Vinson III's book Before Mestizaje: The Frontiers of Race and Caste in Colonial Mexico (Cambridge University Press) has opened new dimensions on race in Latin America by examining the extreme caste groups of colonial Mexico. In tracing their experiences, a broader understanding of the connection between mestizaje (La…
 
Air Date 10/13/2020 Today we take a look at the myths of Columbus and American Exceptionalism™ that we cling to and turn our gaze to some of the less-understood but more accurate and important aspects of our collective history Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 Transcript BECOME A MEMBER! (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) EPI…
 
In 1947, decolonization promised a better life for India's peasants, workers, students, Dalits, and religious minorities. By the 1970s, however, this promise had not yet been realized. Various groups fought for the social justice but in response, Prime Minister, Indira Gandhi suspended the constitution, and with it, civil liberties. The hope of dec…
 
Ellen Wayland-Smith is an associate professor of writing at University of Southern California. Her book The Angel in the Marketplace: Adwoman Jean Wade Rindlaub and the Selling of America (University of Chicago Press, 2020) follows the career of adwoman Jean Wade Rindlaub who in the mid-twentieth century created the advertising campaigns selling co…
 
In the past decade alone, more than ten million corpses have been exhumed and reburied across the Chinese landscape. The campaign has transformed China's graveyards into sites of acute personal, social, political, and economic contestation. In The Chinese Deathscape. Grave Reform in Modern China, three historians of China, Jeffrey Snyder-Reinke, Ch…
 
Studies on marriage migration often portray marriage migrants as victims of globalization and patriarchy. Although there are intersecting oppressions among female migrant workers, the tendency to conflate marriage migration with sex trafficking among humanitarian organizations and scholars lead to erasure of divergent experiences. In her book, Elus…
 
In 1947, decolonization promised a better life for India's peasants, workers, students, Dalits, and religious minorities. By the 1970s, however, this promise had not yet been realized. Various groups fought for the social justice but in response, Prime Minister, Indira Gandhi suspended the constitution, and with it, civil liberties. The hope of dec…
 
In her stunning and conceptually adventurous new book Emotions and Colonial Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor (Oxford University Press, 2020), Margrit Pernau examines the varied and hugely consequential expressions of and normative investments in emotions in modern South Asian Muslim thought. By considering a wide array of sources…
 
Sex, drugs, religion, and love are potent combinations in la zona, a regulated prostitution zone in the city of Reynosa, across the border from Hidalgo, Texas. During the years 2008 and 2009, a time of intense drug violence, Sarah Luna met and built relationships with two kinds of migrants, women who moved from rural Mexico to Reynosa to become sex…
 
We all heard of Jacinda Ardern's electoral win in New Zealand, but not a peep from the media about the landslide win in the Bolivian elections. Clare, Mick and Damien discuss the democracy in action which brought about the monumental win of MAS (Movement Towards Socialism party) in Bolivia, and the rejection of last year's right-wing coup.We've all…
 
Why Give a Damn About Strangers? In his book The Kindness of Strangers: How a Selfish Ape Invented a New Moral Code (Basic Books, 2020), Michael E. McCullough explains. McCullough is a professor of psychology at the University of California San Diego, where he directs the Evolution and Human Behavior laboratory. Long interested in prosocial behavio…
 
When you mention Japanese War crimes in World War Two, you’ll often get different responses from different generations. The oldest among us will talk about the Bataan Death March. Younger people, coming of age in the 1990s, will mention the Rape of Nanking or the comfort women forced into service by the Japanese army. Occasionally, someone will men…
 
On November 3, 1969 Richard M. Nixon addressed the nation in what would come to be known as “The Silent Majority Speech”. In 32 minutes, the president promoted his plan for a “Vietnamization” of the war and called upon “the great silent majority of my fellow Americans” to support his plan “to end the war in a way that we could win the peace”. Argui…
 
Sir Noel Malcolm’s captivating new book, Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750 (Oxford University Press, 2019), tells the story of Western European fascination with the Ottoman empire and Islam between the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the latter half of the 18th century. This beautifully argued, …
 
Simone C. Drake and Dwan K. Henderson's Are You Entertained?: Black Popular Culture in the Twenty-First Century (Duke UP, 2020) is an engaging and interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary black popular culture and how to think about this broad and diverse landscape, especially in relation to power, capitalism, gender identity, and presidential…
 
Sir Noel Malcolm’s captivating new book, Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750 (Oxford University Press, 2019), tells the story of Western European fascination with the Ottoman empire and Islam between the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the latter half of the 18th century. This beautifully argued, …
 
Sir Noel Malcolm’s captivating new book, Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750 (Oxford University Press, 2019), tells the story of Western European fascination with the Ottoman empire and Islam between the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the latter half of the 18th century. This beautifully argued, …
 
Air Date 10/21/2020 Today we take a look at some of the many zany foreign misadventures the United States has had over the past 100 years. And by "zany misadventures" I mean the naked pursuit of capitalism at any cost, the support of military coups and other undemocratic overthrows of foreign governments and wars for oil and resources in an unabash…
 
Hans-Hermann Hoppe has shown in his writings on democracy that democracy leads to economic impoverishment and political disaster under certain conditions. But what are those conditions, and are they dominant in electoral institutions in the United States today? And what role does ideology play in limiting the abuse of the ballot box by voters?Addit…
 
Biochemical engineer and corporate complex problem solver Ivor Cummins (thefatemperor.com) joins us. Support TRIGGERnometry: Paypal: https://bit.ly/2Tnz8yq https://www.subscribestar.com/triggernometry https://www.patreon.com/triggerpod Find TRIGGERnometry on Social Media: https://twitter.com/triggerpod https://www.facebook.com/triggerpod https://ww…
 
What are the possibilities and what are the inequalities of the digital world? In The Digital Lives of Black Women in Britain (Palgrave, 2020), Francesca Sobande, a lecturer in Digital Media Studies at Cardiff University explores the experiences of Black women as producers and as consumers of digital media. The book offers a rich combination of arc…
 
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern impe…
 
In 1618, on the eve of the Thirty Years’ War, the German alchemist and physician Michael Maier published Atalanta fugiens, an intriguing and complex musical alchemical emblem book designed to engage the ear, eye, and intellect. The book unfolds as a series of fifty emblems, each of which contains an accompanying "fugue" music scored for three voice…
 
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, over three hundred young Jewish women from Orthodox, mostly Hasidic, homes in Western Galicia (now Poland) fled their communities and sought refuge in a Kraków convent, where many converted to Catholicism. Relying on a wealth of archival documents, including court testimonies, letters, diaries, …
 
At the end of the 20th century, the liberal international order appeared unassailable after its triumph over the authoritarian challenges of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. Twenty years later, however, the assumptions underlying the system appear discredited as international relations devolve into confrontation and conflict. In The New Twenty Years…
 
In the decades since it was identified in 1981, HIV/AIDS has devastated African American communities. Members of those communities mobilized to fight the epidemic and its consequences from the beginning of the AIDS activist movement. They struggled not only to overcome the stigma and denial surrounding a "white gay disease" in Black America, but al…
 
House and Nathan Hubbard sit down to discuss the latest from the epic showdown between Jason Kokrak and Xander Schauffele at the CJ Cup this past week and what contributed to Kokrak's rise. They are later joined by Jason Sobel of the Action Network to discuss the monumental shift in the world of live TV golf betting, as well as 10 great players to …
 
In an unhampered economy, stock prices would reflect the availability of savings for investment and capital. But in an inflationary economy, rising stock prices suggest something very different.Original article: https://mises.org/wire/no-stock-market-isnt-leading-indicator-economic-prosperityThis Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christop…
 
Management and organizational frameworks often treat people as means. But people are not means. People are subjects, and they have subjective ends of their own.Show notes: https://mises.org/library/david-k-hurst-managing-people-ends-and-not-people-means"Lead Like a Gardener! ― Agile and Design Thinking Will Become Management Fads Unless We Expand O…
 
In Japan, huge social security expenditures have been simply monetized by the Bank of Japan at the expense of the overall welfare and the economic prospects of Japan’s youth.Original article by Taiki Murai & Gunther Schnabl: https://mises.org/wire/japan-embraced-debt-way-out-its-budget-crisis-its-not-workingThis Audio Mises Wire is generously spons…
 
In a slave economy, slave owners seek technological innovations that make slave labor more productive. But they also place inefficient and artificial limits on innovations that might change the established social order.Original article: https://mises.org/wire/why-slave-economies-thwart-entrepreneurial-innovationThis Audio Mises Wire is generously s…
 
Are you in the residential Pest Control Business (or want to be)? Then this one's for you. Steal some secrets from our friend Carmen Reino of Anchor Pest Control in NJ. Who pivoted from majority commercial accounts to residential wins!! He shares his residential business model - billed monthly. We go over some of the Pros and Cons of residential vs…
 
In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited impact of what I write, but I continue to believe that the stakes are high. – Mi…
 
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