show episodes
 
Explore the British countryside and delve into the big rural issues with the team at BBC Countryfile Magazine. Follow us on walks into beautiful places and meet fascinating people. Please subscribe! To find out more about the British countryside, visit www.countryfile.com Subscribe to the print version of BBC Countryfile Magazine at https://www.buysubscriptions.com/print/bbc-countryfile-magazine-subscription
 
The world is so much more than what we know, and only through understanding it better can we make informed decisions. This podcast aims to bring impactful, entertaining and insightful conversations from a global array of guests. Some famous, some you won’t have heard of. From famous explorers, to renowned scientists and just good people, all have a story to tell which we can take something from. Topics are wide ranging, with a backbone centred on conservation, including hunting, fishing, exp ...
 
Each week on “Kowabana: ‘True’ Japanese scary stories from around the internet,” horror author and translator Tara A. Devlin presents a selection of Japanese horror, creepypastas and urban legends translated from the deepest, darkest parts of the web. Creepy ghosts and vengeful onryo, cursed technology and haunted shrines. Discover horror like only Japan knows how to deliver. Brand new and exclusive stories translated each week. Find out more at http://www.kowabana.net/
 
Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers is a lovely little podcast exploring the meaningful and the meaningless. We all have questions in life whether they are big, small, practical or just plain ridiculous. And we all have a go at answering them usually through the prism of our own experiences or the experiences of others. Join Broadcaster Marcus Speller, journalist Sarah Ann Harris and former UN Spokesperson and current trainee ordinand Chris Gaul for a refreshing and entertaining c ...
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
Backchat is RTHK Radio 3's current affairs programme with expert panels and listener participation. It airs every weekday from 8.30am-9.30am. Have your say by calling us on 233 88 266, Backchat's Facebook , or send us a message at backchat@rthk.hk Catch it live: Monday to Friday 8.30am - 9.30am (*except holidays) Podcast: Daily update and available after its broadcast.
 
Follow head gardeners Saul Walker and Lucy Chamberlain as they reveal exactly what it’s like to be professional horticulturists leading busy teams on large, private estates. Lucy and Saul have a decade of Head Gardening experience and it soon became clear to them both that life as a Head Gardener can be incredibly diverse, occasionally challenging and hugely rewarding and so they regularly discuss horticultural topics close to their hearts and give you an insight into their lives as gardeners.
 
Making adventures outdoors a bigger part of your life. Do you ever sit at your desk wishing you were hiking, wild camping, rock climbing, paddleboarding or wild swimming? If you’re nodding your head, The Outdoors Fix is for you. It’s a podcast to to inspire YOU to get outside and make adventures outdoors a bigger part of your life! Hiker and journalist Liv Bolton speaks to fantastic women and men who have changed their lives to get outdoors more and their stories and tips can help listeners ...
 
In this podcast, Matthew Rothwell, author of Transpacific Revolutionaries: The Chinese Revolution in Latin America, explores the global history of ideas related to rebellion and revolution. The main focus of this podcast for the near future will be on the history of the Chinese Revolution, going all the way back to its roots in the initial Chinese reactions to British imperialism during the Opium War of 1839-1842, and then following the development of the revolution and many of the ideas tha ...
 
Ever wondered what happens when you fill a cello with bees? Or how robins have successfully colonised the outer-reaches of our universe? Or why the world is destined to be populated purely by female turtles? This podcast celebrates nature and the stories of those who care deeply for it. Join artist, actor and Woodland Trust ambassador David Oakes, for a series of informal, relaxed conversations with artists, scientists, creatives and environmentalists as they celebrate the beauty of the natu ...
 
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show series
 
Come with us to a narrowboat on the Kennet and Avon canal to talk to Nick Hayes, author of the The Book of Trespass, about how little of the English countryside is open to walkers, riders and canoeists. Learn how our landscapes came to be owned by so few people – and how it might benefit the nation's health to open them up to the public See acast.c…
 
2020 has been an unusual and difficult year for many, and we understand that the full repercussions of what we have all been through are still to be felt - but with summer now distant and the glory of autumn in full flow, we continue with a healthy amount of discussion on some of our favourite horticultural topics, bringing a little dose of the gar…
 
Thanksgiving may look different for most of us this year, but we all usually take a break to relax for a moment over the holiday. This week we relax from the agricultural issues we normally feature to instead hear the interesting tale of a family who knows all about life on the rails. I think you’ll enjoy this unique perspective on life. See omnyst…
 
Most of our discussions about how “technology will change the world” focus on the global cities that drive the world economy. Even when we talk about China, we focus on its major cities: Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. Xiaowei Wang corrects this metronormativity in their recent book Blockchain Chicken Farm: And Other Stories of Tech in China's Coun…
 
In a Post Glyndwr Wales times were hard for some, filled with existential thoughts for others, and an opportunity to rebuild for a small minority. You can find everything we do at DistractionsMedia.com You can support the podcast at patreon.com/WelshHistory Music: Celtic Impulse - Celtic by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribu…
 
Do you prefer wide open spaces or busy roads and streets? Are you one for calm and quiet or noise and vibrancy? Does the thought of public transport fill you with dread or do you relish the rat race? Chris feels safer in the city and is terrified of people lurking in the dark in the countryside. Sarah doesn't like the gossiping culture in her villa…
 
Editor-in-Chief of Sporting Rifle, Peter Carr, comes back on the show to talk about his life, transitioning from skipper to gamekeeper to journalist, and now international conservationist. From the British countryside to the illegal wildlife trade, it's a ranging, intriguing conservation. Support the podcast: www.patreon.com/byronpace Podcast partn…
 
New York City's Lower East Side has witnessed a severe decline in its Jewish population in recent decades, yet every morning in the big room of the city's oldest yeshiva, students still gather to study the Talmud beneath the great arched windows facing out onto East Broadway. In Yeshiva Days: Learning on the Lower East Side (Princeton University Pr…
 
Lot Six (Harper 2020) is a moving and hilarious memoir from playwright David Adjmi. The book traces Adjmi’s search for his identity, during which he becomes an observant yeshiva student, a club kid, a fashionista, a film nerd, a teenage Nietzschean, and finally a playwright. It is a memoir about feeling like the world is against you, yet simultaneo…
 
When did Black Americans move from stalwart party of Lincoln Republicans to dedicated New Deal Democrats? How did a group of self-organized Black economists, lawyers, sociologists, and journalists call out inequality in the New Deal and push President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to consider the relief of Black Americans? Dr. Jill Watt’s The Black Cab…
 
In this episode, I speak with Matt Rafalow, about his book, Digital Divisions: How Schools Create Inequality in the Tech Era (University of Chicago Press, 2020). This book provides an ethnographic study of students and teachers at three Los Angeles schools utilizing instructional technology. We discuss the role of play in learning, how disciplinary…
 
History and geography delineate the operation of power, not only its range but also the capacity to plan and the ability to implement. Approaching state strategy and policy from the spatial angle, Jeremy Black argues that just as the perception of power is central to issues of power, so place, and its constraints and relationships, is partly a matt…
 
Today I talked to Peter Gordon and Juan José Morales about their book Painter and Patron: The Maritime Silk Road in the Códice Casanatense (Abbreviated Press, 2020). The Códice Casanatense, or Codex Casanatense 1889 as it is formally known, is a 16th-century Indo-Portuguese collection of some 76 captioned watercolours now held in the Biblioteca Cas…
 
In his latest monograph, All Against All: The Long Winter of 1933 and The Origins of the Second World War (Harper, 2020), Professor Paul Jankowski (Brandeis University) provides a wide-angled account of a critical period of world history, the interwar years, in which the world transitioned from postwar to the prewar and saw the disintegration of co…
 
In his latest monograph, All Against All: The Long Winter of 1933 and The Origins of the Second World War (Harper, 2020), Professor Paul Jankowski (Brandeis University) provides a wide-angled account of a critical period of world history, the interwar years, in which the world transitioned from postwar to the prewar and saw the disintegration of co…
 
The Routledge Handbook of Yoga and Meditation Studies (Routledge, 2020) is a comprehensive and interdisciplinary resource, which frames and contextualises the rapidly expanding fields that explore yoga and meditative techniques. The book analyses yoga and meditation studies in a variety of religious, historical and geographical settings. The chapte…
 
Why does The Empire Strikes Back matter? In BFI Classics Series's The Empire Strikes Back (Bloomsbury, 2020), Rebecca Harrison, a lecturer in Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow, tells the story of the film’s production and reception, and analyses the film’s on-screen representations. The book is framed through the idea of disr…
 
This is a Special Series on Malcolm X and Black Nationalism. We delve into the background of Malcolm X's action and thought in the context of Black Nationalism, correcting the fundamentally mistaken notion that Malcolm X was a civil rights leader. He certainly did not see himself in that way, and explicitly argued otherwise. This helps us place the…
 
Using case studies and the results of extensive fieldwork, this book considers the nature of state power and legal violence in liberal democracies by focusing on the interaction between law, science, and policing in India. The postcolonial Indian police have often been accused of using torture in both routine and exceptional criminal cases, but the…
 
In his new book Empire of Law: Nazi Germany, Exile Scholars, and the Battle for the Future of Europe (Cambridge UP, 2020), Kaius Tuori examines the inherent unity of European legal traditions that extend to ancient Rome. This book explores the invention of this tradition, tracing it to a group of legal scholars divided by the onslaught of Nazi terr…
 
Tom Rastrelli is a survivor of clergy-perpetrated sexual abuse who then became a priest in the early days of the Catholic Church’s ongoing scandals. Confessions of a Gay Priest: A Memoir of Sex, Love, Abuse, and Scandal in the Catholic Seminary (University of Iowa Press, 2020) divulges the clandes­tine inner workings of the seminary, providing an i…
 
Using case studies and the results of extensive fieldwork, this book considers the nature of state power and legal violence in liberal democracies by focusing on the interaction between law, science, and policing in India. The postcolonial Indian police have often been accused of using torture in both routine and exceptional criminal cases, but the…
 
In this episode, I speak with Matt Rafalow, about his book, Digital Divisions: How Schools Create Inequality in the Tech Era (University of Chicago Press, 2020). This book provides an ethnographic study of students and teachers at three Los Angeles schools utilizing instructional technology. We discuss the role of play in learning, how disciplinary…
 
In this episode, I speak with Matt Rafalow, about his book, Digital Divisions: How Schools Create Inequality in the Tech Era (University of Chicago Press, 2020). This book provides an ethnographic study of students and teachers at three Los Angeles schools utilizing instructional technology. We discuss the role of play in learning, how disciplinary…
 
The Restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660 changed the lives of English republicans for good. Despite the Declaration of Breda, where Charles II promised to forgive those who had acted against his father and the monarchy during the Civil War and Interregnum, opponents of the Stuart regime felt unsafe, and many were actively persecuted. Neverthe…
 
Harvey Araton’s new book Our Last Season: A Writer, a Fan, a Friendship (Penguin, 2020), reads like a mix between Tuesdays with Morrie and a sequel to his book When the Garden was Eden (which chronicled the New York Knicks’ early-70s title teams). It’s a book about friendship, aging and of course, basketball. Harvey Araton is one of New York's--and…
 
Despite the tremendous gains of the LGBT movement in recent years, the history of gay life in this country remains poorly understood. According to conventional wisdom, gay liberation started with the Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village in 1969. The 1970s represented a moment of triumph -- both political and sexual -- before the AIDS crisis in the …
 
In the mid-1980s, Goa witnessed mass demonstrations, violent protests and political mobilising, following which Konkani was declared the official language of the Goan territory. However, Konkani was recognised only in the Devanagari script, one of two scripts used for the language in Goa, the other being the Roman script. Set against this historica…
 
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