show episodes
 
This series of podcasts features experts who analyze the latest developments in the legal and policy world. The podcasts are in the form of monologues, podcast debates or panel discussions and vary in length. The Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers. We hope these broadcasts, like all of our programming, will serve to stimulate discussion and further exchange regarding important current legal is ...
 
SCOTUScast is a project of the Federalist Society for Law & Public Policy Studies. This audio broadcast series provides expert commentary on U.S. Supreme Court cases as they are argued and issued. The Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. We hope these broadcasts, like all of our programming, will serve to stimulate discussion and further exchange regarding important current legal issues. View ou ...
 
Reuters is your politics news source for up to the minute, impartial political news coverage on the leaders, policies and agendas that shape our world. A SpokenEdition transforms written content into human-read audio you can listen to anywhere. It's perfect for times when you can't read - while driving, at the gym, doing chores, etc. Find more at www.spokenedition.com
 
Fifty-seven shots in ninety seconds, five people dead, seven others wounded and it all happened inside a courtroom on a cold March day in 1912. Lives and fortunes were lost over what most believe was a senseless tragedy. The echoes of the gunfire have long since disappeared but the wounds left behind in the quaint little town of Hillsville, Virginia have continued to fester. The political drama that led up to the shooting has divided families for generations. Some say the shootout was self-d ...
 
They used to date each other, they kind of hate each other and now they have a Podcast. The Barely Friending Podcast is hosted by comedians Eddie Della Siepe and MJ Riggins. Each week Eddie & MJ talk about dating, relationships, friendships, sex and of course....their past relationship.
 
On August 15, 2002 in the quiet town of Oak Level, Virginia someone shot and killed Michael and Mary Short in what investigators called an execution style murder. Their daughter 9-year-old Jennifer Short was snatched from her bed, setting off a massive search. Heartbreak 6 weeks later as deputies found her remains 45 minutes away near a North Carolina creek. 17 years later, no suspects, no motive, and no clues as to who killed Jennifer Short.
 
Millions of people feel passionately about Roe v. Wade. And yet, how many of us can explain it? What arguments were made for—and against—the right to abortion? Who made them? How did the Supreme Court justices react? Which ideas won the day and why? The first season of We’ll Hear Arguments takes you inside the Supreme Court for the surprisingly dramatic arguments of Roe. v. Wade. Join Rewire News Group legal experts Jessica Mason Pieklo and Imani Gandy as they analyze and explain the case th ...
 
This self guided tour covers eight of the most significant public buildings in Colonial Williamsburg. These buildings, such as the Raleigh Tavern and the Governor's Palace, were selected for the roles they played in God's plan to bring the United States into being and to spread the Gospel to the New World. We welcome your comments at christianroots@aol.com Credits: Written by David Hemphill Narrated by Tom Morr with Cary Hemphill Produced by Michael Lemley of World Productions.
 
Loading …
show series
 
In 2014, Roxanne Torres pleaded guilty to three crimes: aggravated fleeing from a law enforcement officer, assault on a police officer, and unlawfully taking a motor vehicle. All of these crimes occurred while Ms. Torres was under the influence of methamphetamine. Ms. Torres was stopped by two police officers only after one shot and wounded her. In…
 
Join Dean Mazzone and Matt Cavedon for a discussion of major criminal cases at the U.S. Supreme Court from both last year and the current term. Discussion will cover areas of law ranging from the death penalty and searches and seizures to sentencing guidelines and computer crimes. Featuring: -- Dean A. Mazzone, Senior Trial Counsel, Massachusetts A…
 
Join us as John Malcolm and John Yoo discuss recent Supreme Court news, the 25th amendment, what happens if the Electoral College deadlocks (or fails), as well as the latest on the confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Featuring: -- John G. Malcolm, Vice President, Institute for Constitutional Government, Director of the Meese Center f…
 
On October 13, 2020, The Supreme Court heard oral arguments regarding United States v. Collins (consolidated with United States v. Briggs). The question before the court was whether the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces erred in concluding – contrary to its own longstanding precedent – that the Uniform Code of Military Justice allows prose…
 
Article II and the 12th Amendment require those seeking the office of President and Vice-President be a “natural-born citizen.” The 14th Amendment provides that "all persons born...in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens." But what does it mean to be “subject to the jurisdiction thereof?” These two texts have bee…
 
There was surprising momentum on the issue of insider trading reform at the start of 2020. On December 9, 2019, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Insider Trading Prohibition Act with wide bi-partisan support. In January 2020, the Securities and Exchange Commission sponsored Bharara Task Force on Insider Trading released a report containi…
 
Consolidated with United States v. Collins, United States v. Briggs challenges the idea that a rape charge may only be prosecuted if it is discovered within five years of the crime. Michael Briggs was found gulity of rape in 2014; however, Briggs claimed that the statute of limitations had expired, as the crime happened in 2005. Briggs was convicte…
 
Clemente Avelino Pereida faced removability charges by the Department of Homeland Security after receiving a conviction of attempted criminal impersonation in Nebraska. As a citizen and native of Mexico, Pereida filed for an application for relief from removal. An immigration judge barred relief from removal, finding moral turpitude in his convicti…
 
Liability in motor vehicle accidents is frequently an issue necessitating litigation, but not typically at the level of the Supreme Court. In this case, though, two incidents rose all the way to our highest court. In a Minnesota accident, a passenger driving a Ford vehicle suffered severe brain injury when the passenger-side airbags failed to deplo…
 
October 14, 2020 marks the 40th anniversary of the enactment of the Staggers Rail Act – the law that largely deregulated economic dealings within the freight rail sector. So far removed, the anniversary may seem irrelevant, but the opposite is true: rail deregulation serves as an important case study on matters related to competition, markets, rate…
 
Join us as Paul Ray, the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget, discusses the priorities and work of his office during 2020. Featuring: Hon. Paul J. Ray, Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget Teleforum calls are open to al…
 
Ranging from Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson to Henry Kissinger, Ronald Reagan, and James Baker, America in the World tells the vibrant story of American diplomacy. Recounting the actors and events of U.S. foreign policy, Roberty Zoellick identifies five traditions that have emerged from America's encounters with the wor…
 
The Supreme Court heard oral arguments for Google LLC v. Oracle America Inc. on October 7, 2020. Two questions were before the court: the first was whether copyright protection extends to a software interface; the second was whether, as a jury found, Google's use of a software interface in the context of creating a new computer program constitutes …
 
On October 6, 2020, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments regarding Tanzin v. Tanvir, a case involving the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993, commonly referred to as RFRA. The issue in this case is whether RFRA permits suits seeking money damages against individual federal employees. Stephanie Taub joins us to discuss this case’s oral argu…
 
On October 5, 2020, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments regarding Carney v. Adams, a First Amendment case involving a longstanding Delaware state constitutional provision that limits judges affiliated with any one political party to no more than a “bare majority” on the state’s three highest courts. The leftover seats are reserved for the “other…
 
Recent events have demonstrated how dependent on China the United States has become for critical needs. The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has demonstrated the supply chain vulnerabilities that exist for antibiotics, personal protective equipment (PPE) and other medical equipment. This newly-appreciated vulnerability has occurred against the backdrop…
 
Google copied over 11,000 lines of computer code, called declaring code, owned by Oracle. Ten years after Oracle filed suit, the Supreme Court will hear the oral argument on October 7, 2020. Google says the code is purely functional, is uncopyrightable because there’s only one way to write it, and in any case their copying was fair use. Oracle, bac…
 
This teleforum addresses the October 6, 2020, Supreme Court oral argument in FNU Tanzin v. Tanvir, which involves the sole question of whether the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 (RFRA), 42 U.S.C § 2000bb et seq., permits suits seeking money damages against individual federal employees. The underlying facts of the case involve RFRA claims…
 
As an act of original jusrisdiction, the Supreme Court appointed a river master to resolve a dispute between New Mexico and Texas over the Pecos River back in 1949. Over 70 years later, the actions of this river master are now in question. After a tropical storm in 2014, overflow water from the Texas reservoir Red Bluff was impounded at a federally…
 
In Delaware, there is a state constitutional provision that requires the state’s three highest courts to have no more than a “bare majority” of judges to be affiliated with either major political party. James Adams, a Delaware resident and member of the Delaware bar, decided against applying for a judicial position due to the constitutional provisi…
 
Eleven months ago the Federal Circuit held that the Administrative Patent Judges who serve on the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, were unconstitutionally appointed because they act as “principal officers” within the meaning of the Constitution but were not appointed with the advice and consent of the Senate as required by the Appointments Clause. Th…
 
The case of Midwest Institute of Health, PLLC v. Whitmer concerns the state-law claims (brought to the Michigan Supreme Court through the certified-question process from federal court) made in challenge to all of Michigan Governor Whitmer’s Executive Orders issued after April 30, 2020. On that date, the Michigan Legislature refused to extend Govern…
 
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (Judges Kayatta, Selya and retired Justice Souter) ruled on September 15 that the National Labor Relations Board was correct as a matter of law in holding that private sector unions may never charge dissenting nonmembers for their lobbying activity. The private sector union in this case, United Nurses…
 
The new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) entered into force in the United States on July 1, 2020, and is expected to significantly affect the trade relationship between the United States and Mexico. How successful will it be for either country? This panel of experts will discuss the anticipated effects of USMCA on US-Mexico relations, …
 
In the landmark Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Congress legislated a comprehensive scheme for eradicating employment discrimination in American workplaces. Title VII has been implemented by the federal courts in thousands of cases to remedy discrimination on the basis of race, sex and other protected classifications. Congress and the fe…
 
In this teleforum, James R. Copland will discuss competing legislative proposals in Congress, in the context of a complex phenomenon. In Copland's view, the evidence is clear that black men both disproportionately benefit from policing and disproportionately bear its costs. How should we think about the evidence, and how should we address the issue…
 
The Supreme Court's most recent term ended with several high-profile liberty rulings, including Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue and Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania. This term, set to begin next month, will bring more religious liberty cases before the Court. Chief among these cases is Fulton v. City of Philadelphia, a case whic…
 
The Federalist Society’s Intellectual Property Practice Group will host a conversation with the Hon. Alan D. Albright of the Western District of Texas and Art Gollwitzer III, an attorney with Michael Best in Austin, TX. The speakers will be introduced by the Hon. Ryan T. Holte of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. Please join us for a conversation e…
 
After reportedly contracting COVID-19, if Trump dies then he dies and his supporters will have no one to blame but the Trump administration, and it's likely that he contracted the virus during one of several campaign events where guidelines on wearing masks and social distancing were ignored as some kind of fringe political statement.…
 
The brutal confirmation battles we saw over Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh are symptoms of a larger problem with our third branch of government, a problem that began long before Kavanaugh, Merrick Garland, Clarence Thomas, or even Robert Bork: the courts’ own self-corruption, aiding and abetting the expansion of federal pow…
 
In Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, the Supreme Court confirmed that federal law permits employers to include class action waivers in employment arbitration agreements. In the wake of that decision, employers have increasingly adopted arbitration programs to gain the benefit of class action waivers. Employee-side class action attorneys have responded b…
 
The Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed retaining both the existing particulate matter and ozone primary and secondary standards. Over the last several decades, air quality in the United States has improved dramatically. Though many have advocated for more stringent PM and ozone standards, the environmental and public health imperativ…
 
BTR News with Scotty Reid walks through the documented timeline of the killing of 24 yr old US citizen Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky on March 23, 2020, by narcotics officers enforcing a decades-old drug war that has claimed perhaps thousands of lives by law enforcement officers kicking down doors in the middle of the night with the controv…
 
Benjamin Lloyd Crump is a US attorney who specializes in civil rights and catastrophic personal injury cases. It seems that his law firm is the popular choice when it comes to families who have suffered civil rights violations by government employees. He is frequently a media guest when it comes to commentary surrounding police shooting case.…
 
Now six months into the COVID pandemic, the Internet has offered Americans a welcome economic, educational and sometimes even psychological lifeline to weather the crisis. Given Americans’ increased reliance on broadband, politicians on both sides of the aisle are now actively campaigning on the issue of expanding broadband deployment. Republicans …
 
After 87 victims, 53 separate crime scenes, and multiple investigations spanning over four decades, the Golden State Killer was finally brought to justice this past August when he was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. The key piece of evidence that led investigators to the serial burglar, rapist, and murderer was not a …
 
Poker is a competitive game. Unlike other casino games, poker is player vs player. Criminal hackers have understood this for a while and sometimes hack the other players to get an edge. And that small edge can result in millions of dollars in winnings. This episode contains a story from Mikko Hypponen of F-Secure. We also interview Mikko to know mo…
 
In the last year, many states had seen a new wave of lawsuits against religious organizations based on alleged sexual abuse from decades ago. New York’s Child Victims Act, which revived previously-time barred claims and at first opened a one-year window to bring them, has now extended that window by another year. Thousands of claims were already br…
 
As the United Arab Emirates and Israel agreed to establish diplomatic ties, Iran and China’s 25-year, $400 billion deal lurks in the background. The nearly finalized Iran-China Deal provides potential for equal or greater regional consequence. Iran, weakened by sanctions and Covid-19 impacts, has turned East to find both economic and military suppo…
 
The False Claims Act, which imposes civil and criminal liability on those who submit false claims for payment to the federal government, serves as a primary tool in the federal government’s enforcement arsenal. At the same time, the global COVID-19 pandemic and the CARES Act have led the federal government to disburse unprecedented amounts of money…
 
In the 2019 Term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued three decisions with major implications for religious organizations, addressing such issues as access to government programs, conscience exemptions in health-care plans, and the ministerial exemption in employment litigation, as well as a per curiam decision arising from a bankruptcy of a pension plan…
 
The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court will soon hear a lawsuit on accelerated consideration brought by the New Civil Liberties Alliance that aims to restore constitutional governance to the Commonwealth. The suit seeks to overturn the Civil Defense State of Emergency, which Gov. Charlie Baker declared under the Commonwealth’s Civil Defense Act, …
 
Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act provides liability protection to platforms, internet service providers, and other online intermediaries for third-party content they host or republish. It also provides liability protections for actions taken “in good faith” by such entities to moderate content. Section 230 has recently come under scrut…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2020 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login