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In this episode of The Curious Clinicians, Tony, Hannah and Avi learn about the mechanisms of thirst, why drinking liquids immediately quenches thirst, and why patients with primary polydipsia drink excessively. Remember to get your CME/MOC credit for listening to the episode. Check out the show notes for the episode at our website as well as Tony'…
 
This is the second episode in a two-part series called "The Eyes Have It", where The Curious Clinicians explore questions related to the eye. In this episode Hannah, Avi, and Tony learn about why bilirubin deposits in the eye, as well as why the term "scleral icterus" is anatomically incorrect. Remember to pick CME/MOC credit just for listening to …
 
This is the first episode of a two-part series called "The Eyes Have It", where The Curious Clinicians explore questions related to the eye. In this episode Tony, Hannah, and Avi explore why Wilson disease can present with Kayser-Fleischer corneal rings. Remember to pick up CME/MOC credit just for listening to the episode! Check out the show notes …
 
For a special holiday treat, we’re going to explore two tales of salmonella disease detectives -- the first about Mary Mallon (“Typhoid Mary”) and the birth of the genre; and the second about a mysterious salmonella outbreak at Massachusetts General Hospital solved with the assistance of a very jolly patient. Along the way, we’ll talk about clinica…
 
Tony appeared as a guest on the Bedside Rounds podcast with Adam Rodman. Tony and Adam delve into race, racism, and the social determinants of health through three historic plagues in the United States — yellow fever in New Orleans, poliomyelitis, and the early days of HIV/AIDS — and explore what lessons we can learn for the current COVID-19 pandem…
 
Learn about why cryptococcal meningitis can cause such severe elevations in intracranial pressure, while often causing only minimal inflammation. Don't forget, you can get CE/MOC credit just for listening! Check out the show notes for this episode and read Avi's tweetorial on this topic. You can support the podcast and pick up some sweet swag from …
 
Diagnosis is arguably the most important job of a physician. But what does it actually mean to make a diagnosis? In this episode, we’ll explore this question by tracking the development of the “classical” model of diagnosis and pathological anatomy and discussing three cases over three hundred years. Along the way, we’ll ponder the concept of the l…
 
This is the next installment of our series on questions from intern year, with a question that came up on rounds. Hannah examines theories as to why septic pulmonary emboli often present in the periphery and bases of the lungs, while "bland" pulmonary do not. Don't forget to pick up your CE/MOC credits, courtesy of VCU Health! You can read the show…
 
In this episode, I talk about my podcasting journey -- how I started Bedside Rounds for inspiration during a low period in residency, how it changed me as a physician, and how it has changed my views about digital education and the future of medical education in general. This is a live recording of a talk I gave at the Michigan ACP annual meeting l…
 
The Curious Clinicians are back at it, exploring why magnesium so effectively treats the arrythmia torsades de pointes. Hint: it's the same mechanism as magnesium's effects on bronchospasm in severe asthma and seizures in eclampsia! As always, you can get CE/MOC credits just for listening! To learn more, check out the show notes for this episode on…
 
The COVID-19 pandemic laid bare the racial health disparities in the United States, with markedly increased mortality especially among Blacks and Native Americans. In this episode, Tony Breu and I discuss the conception of race, racism, and the social determinants of health through three historic plagues in the United States -- from yellow fever in…
 
This is the first in a series where Hannah explores clinical questions that have arisen during her intern year. In this episode, The Curious Clinicians learn why acetaminophen toxicity can lead to an anion gap metabolic acidosis. Don't forget, you can obtain CE/MOC credits just for listening! To learn more, check out the show notes for this episode…
 
Avi, Tony, and Hannah are back at it, investigating why metronidazole treats both bacterial and parasitic infections, why it's only effective against anaerobic organisms, and how this relates to the supposed disulfiram-like reaction. The episode opens with an important message from Dr. Mark Shapiro (host of the Explore The Space podcast) about Vote…
 
In August of 1918, a horrific second wave of the Spanish Flu crashed across the world. In this episode, the third of a four-part series exploring hydroxychloroquine and COVID-19, I’ll explore this single moment in time, through the mysterious origins of the Spanish Flu and historiographical controversies, scientific missions to mass burial sites in…
 
Do you miss digging into the “why” behind what we do every day in medicine? Join Hannah, Tony, and Avi in The Curious Clinicians podcast as they delve into "why", starting with episode 1: Why does fingernail clubbing happen in so many different diseases? Show notes: https://curiousclinicians.com/?p=481 CE/MOC: https://ce.vcuhealth.org/CuriousClinic…
 
The 1918 influenza pandemic, or the Spanish Flu, is the obvious parallel to the COVID-19 pandemic -- a worldwide plague attacking a scientific and global society much like our own. In this guest episode by Hannah Abrams and Gaby Mayer, we chase these parallels wherever they take us, talking etiology, presentation, treatments, masking, curve-flatten…
 
Plagues have fascinated us since antiquity, but the Antonine Plague stands out because one of the most famous physicians in Western history was present to make detailed observations. In this episode, guest host Liam Conway-Pearson explores what we know -- and what we don't know -- about this plague, which ravaged Rome two millennia ago. Plus a bran…
 
Over the past several centuries, the medical field has established a firm graph on the domain of the human body, with one very notable exception -- the teeth. In this episode, we’re going to explore this historic split between medicine and dentistry, and the moment in history where the two fields could have been rejoined but were “rebuffed.” Along …
 
Did Hippocrates call consults for chest pain? Were there specialists in black bile? Where does our poetic terminology for heart and lung sounds come from? Is there a historical parallel for #MedTwitter? I’ve fallen off the bus with #AdamAnswers, so in this month’s episode I’m playing catch up on many of the amazing questions you guys send me with t…
 
At the end of 2019, William Osler’s legacy is stronger than ever; he has been called the “Father of Modern Medicine” and held up as the paragon of the modern physician. In this episode, I’m going to explore the historical Osler -- just who was William Osler in the context of rapidly changing scientific medicine at the dawn of the 20th century, and …
 
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