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Talitha Rowland is the Cabinet Office Deputy Director who runs the secretariat for the Cabinet's Parliamentary Business and Legislation Committee, which is charged with overseeing the development of the government's legislative agenda. In this unprecedented interview she offers a rare insight of a civil servant's view of the lawmaking process, in d…
 
Jacob Rees-Mogg hands over the reins to Lord Hannan of Kingsclere for a special episode to conclude the second series of 'Why Parliament Works'. The pair discuss what the powers returned from the European Union mean for the UK Parliament - and how parliamentarians should respond to their new, strengthened roles.…
 
Dame Eleanor Laing is the House of Commons' senior deputy speaker, the Chairman of Ways and Means. In this episode she discusses with Jacob Rees-Mogg her career in Westminster - including her time as special adviser to Leader of the House John MacGregor from 1990 to 1992; her election in 1997; and her views on the Commons during the pandemic.…
 
The Domestic Abuse Act 2021 is a landmark piece of legislation and the result of extensive scrutiny by Parliament. In this special episode of the 'Why Parliament Works' podcast to mark Royal Assent - the moment when the bill becomes an Act of Parliament - Minister for Safeguarding Victoria Atkins discusses her work with MPs and peers to improve the…
 
Catherine McKinnell is the MP for Newcastle upon Tyne North and chairman of the Commons' petitions committee, which has been giving members of the public the opportunity to influence parliamentary business since its establishment in 2015. This episode explains the ongoing relevance of petitioning, one of the oldest forms of seeking redress of griev…
 
Carolyn Harris is the Member of Parliament for Swansea East and a regular contributor to business questions, where she often praises individuals and organisations in her constituency. In this episode Jacob Rees-Mogg discusses with her how MPs of all parties can support their constituents and how campaigning MPs can make a real difference to people'…
 
The development of petitioning during the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries is an important chapter in the UK Parliament's history. This period saw a broadening of the scope of the issues under consideration: cases of individuals seeking redress of grievance continued throughout but were increasingly supplemented by instances when the king was asked to…
 
In his long and distinguished parliamentary career Lord Hague of Richmond has seen the Commons - and more recently, the Lords - from every conceivable angle: backbencher, junior minister, leader of the opposition, shadow foreign secretary, first secretary of state, foreign secretary and of course Leader of the House. In this episode Jacob Rees-Mogg…
 
Following the UK's exit from the European Union the three principles of parliamentary of sovereignty as defined by A.V. Dicey, that great constitutional theorist, once again fully apply to Westminster. These are that Parliament is the supreme lawmaking body and can enact laws on any subject; that Parliament cannot bind its successor; and that no co…
 
Sir John Fortescue is underappreciated today despite being the leading political thinker in England in the 15th century. His concept of a dominium politicum et regale, articulated in the midst of the Wars of the Roses, recognised that the governance of England rests on political consultation rather than unfettered executive fiat. In this episode Le…
 
The 'How Parliament Works' textbook, co-authored by Lord Lisvane (see S1 E6), defines the usual channels as "the informal and private contacts between the whips and business managers of the two sides of each House". In this episode Lord Young of Cookham, a former Leader of the House and Chief Whip, explains why these interactions are so important f…
 
The United Kingdom’s 21st century constitution can directly trace its commitment to the concept of consent from the people back to the 1297 Statute Concerning Tallage. In this episode Dr Sophie Ambler of the University of Lancaster puts the 1297 Statute into its 13th century context - reflecting on it as the culmination of a story that began in 121…
 
The second series of 'Why Parliament Works' explores elements of Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg's Wheeler-Booth Memorial Lecture to the Study of Parliament Group, delivered on 8 January 2021. Here is the lecture in full, which argues that the unseen parts of parliament are more - not less - democratic than you think.…
 
In what might just be a ministerial first, Speaker of the House of Commons Sir Lindsay Hoyle is interviewed by Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg. Mr Speaker used their interview to reflect on his first 12 months in the job - including his unexpected diagnosis of type 1 diabetes during the general election and masterminding the extraord…
 
Westminster Foundation for Democracy strengthens democracy by supporting parliaments, political parties, civil society and elections around the world. Its director of programmes, Shannon O'Connell, shares her thoughts on why parliaments work with Jacob Rees-Mogg, before the Leader of the House talks to Lana Prlić, an MP in the Parliament of Bosnia …
 
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