show episodes
 
Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
A science pod-yssey brought to you by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow. Naturally Speaking is first and foremost a podcast covering cutting edge research and light hearted ecology banter. We have invited blog posts and podcasts from researchers across our Institute and also visiting speakers. We’ve got a little something for everyone.
 
At the Institute for Ecological Civilization we are working internationally to support systemic approaches to long-term sustainability by developing collaborations among government, business, and religious leaders and among scholars, activists, and policy makers. This podcast provides a glimpse into the kinds of projects and conversations that we regularly take part in. If you enjoy this podcast, you can help support the work that we are doing at EcoCiv by making a donation at ecociv.org. Mu ...
 
The Emerging Leaders in Environmental and Energy Policy Network (ELEEP) is a joint project of the Ecologic Institute and the Atlantic Council. Launched in fall 2011, ELEEP is a dynamic, membership-only forum for the exchange of ideas, policy solutions, best-practices and professional development for early and mid-career North American and European leaders working on environmental and energy issues. ELEEP currently has over 100 members, split between North America and Europe. Members debate t ...
 
In the lead-up and follow-up to the international climate talks in Paris at the end of 2015, the POLIMP Webinar Series captures live online discussions with the EU's leading experts on climate policy. The Webinar Series is moderated by Matthias Duwe, Head of Climate at Ecologic Institute, who is joined by guest speakers carefully selected to provide expert analysis and opinion on various topics relating to international climate negotiations and EU climate policy. Each webinar takes place as ...
 
On a rocky outcropping off the northeastern coast of England, the monastery of Lindisfarne once stood as an outpost of religious, philosophic, and intellectual study against the “dark” times of early medieval Europe. Inspired by the foresight and dogged determination of these medieval monks, William Irwin Thompson founded the Lindisfarne Association in 1972 to gather together bold scientists, scholars, artists, and contemplatives to realize a new planetary culture in the face of the politica ...
 
Is your family thinking of adding a fish tank or pond to your home? Fish tanks and ponds are wonderful places to observe a habitat on a smaller scale. Its like having your very own window into a fresh water riverbed or saltwater ocean. Keeping aquarium fish is a pleasurable and educational hobby for families around the world. Keeping fish as pets has been a tradition going back to ancient Egypt and China. Today, many more different, beautiful and fascinating kinds of fish and other aquatic a ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Friedrich Nietzsche engaged closely with Christian themes and concepts, re-casting them for a secular age. One of these was transfiguration, the strange alchemical process by which human brokenness and misfortune can be turned into a kind of redemption. For Nietzsche, this was an aesthetic process, and it made an art form of philosophy.…
 
Amanda Brezzell from Fennigan's Farms in Detroit is back and this time she's brought her co-founder Claire! In this episode I chatted with them about the wonderful different types of pollinators out there, why they're so important, and how we can help them thrive especially in urban environments. It's more than just insects that pollinate plants yo…
 
Growing Real Food For Nutrition (GRFFN) is a UK Community Interest Company testing and trialling ways to grow and measure the nutrition density of our food. Elizabeth Westaway and Matt Adams answer the question "is a carrot a carrot?" in this episode and explore the benefits of growing in an agroecological and permacultural environment as opposed t…
 
Seventy thousand years ago, humans migrated on foot across the ancient continent of Sahul — the landmass that has since split up into Australia and New Guinea. Mapping the journeys of these ancient voyagers is no small task: previous efforts to understand prehistoric migrations relied on coarse estimates based on genomic studies or on spotty record…
 
Historically, shared resources such as forests, fishery stocks, and pasture lands have often been managed with an aim toward averting "tragedies of the commons," which are thought to result from selfish overuse. Writing in BioScience, Drs. Senay Yitbarek (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Karen Bailey (University of Colorado Boulder), N…
 
We all use numbers every day of our lives, and most of us fail to appreciate how mysterious they are. What exactly is a number? You can't trip over the number 4, it has no physical properties, so in what sense can it be said to exist? If it's just a symbolic representation, then why are numbers and other mathematical objects so effective in the rea…
 
Biogenic Amorphous Silica is a natural product that offers an impressive array of benefits when added to any soil type or potting medium. Nick Clayton is a Co-Founder of a company called Mineral Magic which is mining and distributing BAS in Australia, and in this episode he helps us understand why we might consider purchasing some to help give our …
 
The Bird Emergency podcast is an Aussie show run by a fellow Melbournian, Grant Williams. I was lucky enough to be invited on the show, along with Dr Holly Parsons, to speak about something I'm particularly passionate about which is building habitat in the garden. We speak about building layers into the garden for habitat, having a variety of food …
 
In this bonus episode, Wendy speaks with evolutionary biologist David Sloan Wilson. This episode is being released in conjunction with Mind & Life's new film, Evolution of the Heart — a short documentary covering conversations between the Dalai Lama, David Sloan Wilson, and social scientist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela from a 2019 Mind & Life event in D…
 
Bonnitta Roy returns to the podcast to discuss relations among science, Buddhism, and philosophy. In this conversation, Bonnitta responds to Evan Thompson's comments on Buddhist modernism from episode 25, offering a different image of the science and Buddhism dialogue grounded in notions of embodiment and complex dynamical systems.This Episode:Twit…
 
A commitment to democratic values is becoming a new organising principle in international affairs. Major military (eg NATO), economic (eg OECD) and security (eg the Quad) groupings are increasingly promoted as alliances of liberal democracies, over and above their original core purpose. The Biden administration is planning a “Summit of Democracy” a…
 
Jeanette Severs is a journalist and writer that I'm friends with on Twitter who's a bit of a trailblazer in the agricultural journalism space. In this episode, she explains why biosecurity is so important, how Australia is well situated for defence against pests and diseases, and some of the outbreaks that have given us a good scare in the past. EP…
 
This week we conclude our two-part discussion with ecologist Mark Ritchie of Syracuse University on how he and his SFI collaborators are starting to rethink the intersections of thermodynamics and biology to better fit our scientific models to the patterns we observe in nature. Most of what we know about the enzymatic processes of plant and animal …
 
Tom Wall is a guitarist in a band that plays music with plants called Cosmic Knot. They use a device that translates a plant's electromagnetic output using a node each in the root zone and clipped onto a leaf. In this episode, Tom explains how he plays music with plants, and how they play back to him which is the closest thing I've ever seen to two…
 
In this episode, we're joined by Dr. Charlie Fenster, Professor at South Dakota State University, Director of Oak Lake Field Station, and President of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), Dr. Pam Soltis of the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida, Director of University of Florida Biodiversity Institute, A…
 
The death of analytic philosophy has been confidently predicted for almost as long as analytic philosophy has been around. But today, with profound challenges posed by feminism, postcolonialism and critical race theory, could its long-heralded demise finally be on the horizon? And what exactly do we mean when we talk about analytic philosophy anywa…
 
Gary Moran has recently gone viral because of a Facebook post he did on putting his bin out for the first time in over 3 years. In this episode, he teaches us how we can practically minimise the amount of waste we produce, both in the garden and in other areas of our lives. EPISODE LINKS If you aren't following Gary on Twitter, go and do so now: ht…
 
Deep inside your cells, the chemistry of life is hard at work to make the raw materials and channel the energy required for growth, maintenance, and reproduction. Few systems are as intricate or as mysterious. For this reason, how a cell does what it does remains a frontier for research — and, consequently, theory often grows unchecked by solid dat…
 
This new series features guests recorded in front of a live audience. In this episode, we talked with Matthew David Segall about his book Physics of the World Soul: Whitehead's Adventure in Cosmology. Matthew is an assistant professor in the Philosophy and Religion Department at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Fan Francisco, Cal…
 
Joe Timar is a Twitter friend of mine from the US who's living a "half homestead" life, where he and his wife produce a decent amount of food on their land, but they aren't fully self sufficient. We speak about why the black walnuts on his land make it impossible to grow most things, what his soil is like, and finding first nations' arrowheads that…
 
Karl Marx's interest in philosophy took an early swerve into journalism, and he famously wrote that "philosophers have only interpreted the world - the point is to change it". On one hand he was a revolutionary who favoured getting his hands dirty in the muck of history over abstract theorising, but on the other hand he was also a man of ideas who …
 
Ben Sims is the other half of Plants Grow Here, a successful landscape business owner and a member for the Landscape Industry Association of Western Australia (LIAWA). In this episode, he's back to walk us through a topic that's often oversimplified and overlooked: weeds. What are they? How do we deal with them? Can we learn to love them in certain…
 
The 19th Century saw many transformations: the origins of ecology and modern climatology, new unifying theories of the living world, the first Big Science projects, revolutions in the Spanish colonies, new information systems for the storage and representation of data… Many of these can be traced back to the influence of one singular explorer, Alex…
 
In this episode, Huma Gupta speaks with Rawan Maki about fast fashion and the question of sustainability in Bahrain and beyond. They explore the past, present, and speculative futures of the fashion industry. Maki traces the life-cycle of the clothing we wear everyday, mapping its geographies from the crops and petroleum necessary to produce organi…
 
Ever wondered who plants the wildflowers on campus? Or how many species you might spot on a walk around Glasgow? In this episode, Naturally Speaking’s Emma Plant and Alexa Roditi interview not one, but three guests in a roundtable discussion about wildlife on campus. Agnes Berner, the biodiversity coordinator of Glasgow University’s Environmental S…
 
This is episode 77 of the Logos Institute Podcast. In this episode, we (Joanna Leidenhag and Jonathan Rutledge) interview Meghan Page (Loyola University Maryland) and Allison Krile Thornton (University of South Alabama) on the problem of shame and reframing the self-narrative in light of the work of Christ. I hope you enjoy!Dr Meghan D. Page - http…
 
Does anti-racism require open borders? Should refugees be selected on the basis of the skills they offer? Can immigration restrictions conform to the demands of justice? Conventional wisdom says that philosophers approach these kinds of questions from a normative perspective - their job is to establish principles for how a society should be run, as…
 
Philippa Bassett is the PR and Communications Manager at The Forest Bathing Institute in the UK, and in this episode she introduces the concept of forest bathing to us, and explains how to practically do this this style of meditation, or playtime, or whatever you want to call it! She also tells us about some of the studies the TFBI have undertaken …
 
A discussion of environmental DNA and RNA (eDNA and eRNA, respectively) and its potential for pathogen monitoring. eDNA and eRNA approaches work through the collection of a sample (often from an aquatic source), whose genetic contents are then sequenced to reveal the presence and prevalence of pathogens. This conversation focuses on two cases, that…
 
Evan Thompson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and an Associate Member of the Department of Asian Studies and the Department of Psychology (Cognitive Science Group). He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.This Episode:Evan Thompson: https://evanthompson.me/Twitter: https://twitter.com/evantthompso…
 
In conversation with Malihe Razazan, Gianfranco Rosi discusses his film "Notturno" (2020) which was shot over a 3 year period along the borders between Syria, Iraq, Kurdistan, and Lebanon, giving voice to a human drama that transcends geographical divisions and time. Courtesy of Voices of the Middle East and North Africa (VOMENA).…
 
Sarah Wilson is a gardening business owner, as well as the host of the excellent gardening podcast called Roots And All. In this episode, we chat about the importance of ecology in a modern approach to gardening, how online content can be beneficial for formal and informal studies, and how each of us got into professional gardening in the first pla…
 
In this episode, Wendy speaks with environmentalist Dekila Chungyalpa about her views of nature, the climate crisis, and her unique collaborations with faith leaders. Their conversation covers many topics, including: growing up in the Himalayas and being interconnected with nature; the dominance of dualistic thinking in the West, and the dangerous …
 
When you hear the word “nature,” what comes to mind? Chances are, if you are listening to this in the 21st Century, the image is one of a vast, interconnected, living network — one in which you and your fellow human beings play a complicated part. And yet, this is a relatively recent way of thinking for the modern West. It takes a special kind of t…
 
Scottish philosopher David Hume was an amiable 18th century gentleman - cultured, generous, well liked by all who knew him. And yet he's become something of a "thinker's thinker", hugely admired by academic philosophers, but never quite managing to fire the public imagination or attain the mythic status of a Socrates or a Nietzsche. Our guest this …
 
Nathan Straume is a TerraCottem training, compliance and regional manager in Queensland and the U.S.A, as well as an account manager at StrataGreen and in this episode he explains what's so good about TerraCottem when compared to other "hydrogels" on the market, and how a non-organic product can build soil biology and structure. AUSTRALIAN GIVEAWAY…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login