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Best Economist podcasts we could find (updated August 2020)
Best Economist podcasts we could find
Updated August 2020
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Delivered before breakfast, The Economist Morning Briefing tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full Economist Morning Briefing: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://briefing.economist.com for access to the full ...
 
Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both ...
 
Think Like an Economist and you’ll see the world more clearly, empowering you to make better decisions at work, at home, and in your community. Leading economists Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers will take you on a joyous romp through their field as they introduce you to the big ideas in economics, and show how you can apply them to live in your own life. Their signature approach reveals that every decision is an economic decision and this podcast uncovers the economic forces that shape t ...
 
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show series
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the absent student, (9:55) Beirut: a city in ruins, (19:45) and why TV from China’s Hunan province has become so popular. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See aca…
 
The coronavirus pandemic has widened inequality in America but has also supercharged charitable giving. Host Anne McElvoy asks Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, whether philanthropy can help save the American Dream. Will companies that proclaim the new era of "stakeholder capitalism" actually sideline their shareholders? And as t…
 
A shortage of covid-19 tests around the world has hampered efforts to contain it. Could "pool sampling" be a solution? Also, the promise of million-mile electric car batteries? And, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a developmental biologist at the University of Cambridge and Caltech, on the mysteries of life after conception. Kenneth Cukier hosts Please s…
 
The global pandemic has hit American companies hard, reflected in the latest earnings season, and it could be many quarters before a return to profitability. In Europe, Germany is used to being an economic powerhouse, but the virus has left it in a slump. And, could central banks ditch cash in favour of virtual money? Simon Long hosts Please subscr…
 
Want to make ‘no regrets decisions’? This podcast will teach you how! Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers are on a mission to equip everyone with key tools from economics that can truly transform your life: from career dilemmas and financial conundrums to sorting out complicated problems in your personal life, economics will help you. Let’s get stu…
 
In this climate-themed episode we imagine how the Republican party might pivot on environmental policy and go green for 2024. We consider how climate scientists map out different scenarios for the trajectory of global warming. Also, a journey to 2050 to see how oil companies have reinvented themselves to suck CO2 out of the atmosphere. Tom Standage…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the absent student, (9:55) Beirut: a city in ruins, (19:45) and why TV from China’s Hunan province has become so popular. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See aca…
 
The Economist's election forecast shows Joe Biden heading for a landslide victory. But August is not November. President Trump has recently shifted focus back to the coronavirus in an attempt to rescue his reelection bid and Republicans have outpaced Democrats in swing-state voter registration. How can fortunes change during a campaign? We ask Stua…
 
Survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings are now in their eighties. A new generation is learning to tell their tales, in hopes of preventing more atomic tragedies. Belarus’s president of 26 years will probably win in Sunday’s election, but an invigorated—and unexpected—opposition has him on the back foot. And the horror movie that will make…
 
The coronavirus pandemic has widened inequality in America but has also supercharged charitable giving. Host Anne McElvoy asks Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, whether philanthropy can help save the American Dream. Will companies that proclaim the new era of "stakeholder capitalism" actually sideline their shareholders? And as t…
 
Some 300,000 people are homeless after an explosion of unthinkable size. The culprit appears to be sheer negligence, brought on by a broken system of governance. The Economist’s data team has updated its excess-death tracker, giving ever-better insight into just how deadly covid-19 is. And the tricky trade-offs for both bosses and workers as they r…
 
Consecration at Ayodhya, the country’s most contested holy site, is another tick box in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu-nationalist agenda. Is India’s foundational secularism at risk? The pandemic has been particularly cruel for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s; we examine new research that gives them a ray of hope. And the massive, wheel-t…
 
Since the Arab spring the country has vastly expanded its military and diplomatic efforts—filling an evident power vacuum and harking back to the days of the Ottoman Empire. Tanzania’s economy was recently upgraded to “middle-income” status, but our analysis suggests something is fishy in its data. And why an Athens hotel will have two floors loppe…
 
The territory’s elections have been postponed, its activists barred from running—police are even targeting them abroad. What next for the democracy movement? We ask whether the global protests about race will affect rampant discrimination in Arab countries, most of which host a minority black population. And the solution to a viniferous mystery tha…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Google: how to cope with middle age (9:15), migration as the pandemic recedes (16:25), and regional inequality in Britain. The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, dig…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Google: how to cope with middle age (9:15), migration as the pandemic recedes (16:25), and regional inequality in Britain. The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, dig…
 
Twice recently an eruption in middle America has shocked the world. Four years ago voters in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania were decisive in putting Donald Trump in the White House. Two months ago, George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis prompted debate on racism everywhere. In a special episode on the Midwest, the region’s role in the 2020 elect…
 
Enormous growth over 22 years has brought challenges, both from within and from outside; we examine the tech behemoth’s prospects. Wealth has always exploded wherever humans interacted more—and so have epidemics. We look back on the historical links between economic success and hygiene. And Dubai tries to lure tourists for its sweltering summer sea…
 
How do you become a world-class athlete? Edwin Moses was undefeated in the 400m hurdles for 9 years, 9 months and 9 days and held the world record on four separate occasions. Anne McElvoy asks Moses, the chair of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, if state-sponsored doping can be eradicated, how the pandemic is affecting the Olympic Games and what does p…
 
How do you become a world-class athlete? Edwin Moses was undefeated in the 400m hurdles for 9 years, 9 months and 9 days and held the world record on four separate occasions. Anne McElvoy asks Moses, the chair of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, if state-sponsored doping can be eradicated, how the pandemic is affecting the Olympic Games and what does p…
 
The crisis has disproportionately squeezed migrants and has given many leaders an excuse to tighten borders. Will the restrictions outlast the pandemic? Balkan countries were notorious for organised crime in the 1990s—but a new report suggests the next generation of tech-savvy gangsters is even more formidable. And a look at this summer’s clutch of…
 
Three nations set out on separate missions to shed light on a question that astronomers have been asking for centuries—is there life on Mars? Alok Jha asks leading scientists about how their missions will search for signs of life on the red planet. And, why those investigating it should avoid irreversible damage to a potentially pristine ecosystem.…
 
Five years ago a $4.5bn hole in a development fund scrambled Malaysia’s politics. Now the inquiry has claimed its first scalp: that of Najib Razak, a former prime minister. We examine the grand shift of business to “shadow banks”—a more innovative, if less regulated, end of the industry. And we join a mushroom-picking expedition in China’s Yunnan p…
 
In response to the covid-19 pandemic governments have pumped huge amounts of cash into economies and the role of central banks is changing dramatically. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Henry Curr, The Economist's economics editor, whether this heralds a new era of macroeconomics. Economists Ken Rogoff and Claudia Sahm look at what else policymakers ca…
 
In response to the covid-19 pandemic governments have pumped huge amounts of cash into economies and the role of central banks is changing dramatically. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Henry Curr, The Economist's economics editor, whether this heralds a new era of macroeconomics. Economists Ken Rogoff and Claudia Sahm look at what else policymakers ca…
 
Camouflaged personnel with no insignia, protesters bundled into unmarked vans: the President Donald Trump's plan to put federal officers into American cities is a worrying political ploy. Our annual Big Mac index examines which currencies are over- and undervalued; we take a meaty look at what burgernomics reveals. And Indian scientists simultaneou…
 
In this climate-themed episode we imagine how the Republican party might pivot on environmental policy and go green for 2024. We consider how climate scientists map out different scenarios for the trajectory of global warming. Also, a journey to 2050 to see how oil companies have reinvented themselves to suck CO2 out of the atmosphere. Tom Standage…
 
Scientists are looking to South-East Asia to find how the virus got its start in humans. Knowing that could head off future pandemics. It is often hard to blame climate change unequivocally for weather events, but there is no other explanation for this year’s searing Arctic temperatures. And why well-to-do Africans are shopping around for more perm…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the new era of macroeconomics; (9:25) the EU after striking a huge deal; (17:00) and the challenges for Mexico as its youth departs. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastof…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the new era of macroeconomics; (9:25) the EU after striking a huge deal; (17:00) and the challenges for Mexico as its youth departs. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastof…
 
Plans to abolish the Minneapolis police department after the death of George Floyd are running into opposition, as Jon Fasman reports from the city. Meanwhile, President Trump has promised a surge of federal law enforcement beyond Portland. City commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty says people there will continue to protest the presence of unidentified arm…
 
The pandemic has taken its greatest toll in the world’s nursing homes—but the systemic problems surrounding elderly care long predate covid-19. Economists’ usual barometers have gone topsy-turvy during the crisis, so statisticians are turning to “real-time” data; we ask if these novel measures measure up. And reflecting on the life of America’s civ…
 
With a sweeping new national-security law, has China won the battle for Hong Kong? Anne McElvoy interviews Regina Ip, a pro-Beijing member of Hong Kong’s cabinet, and Nathan Law, a prominent pro-democracy activist who has fled to the UK. Mrs Ip claims the democratic movement has been hijacked by secessionists and that activists like Mr Law are too …
 
With a sweeping new national-security law, has China won the battle for Hong Kong? Anne McElvoy interviews Regina Ip, a pro-Beijing member of Hong Kong’s cabinet, and Nathan Law, a prominent pro-democracy activist who has fled to the UK. Mrs Ip claims the democratic movement has been hijacked by secessionists and that activists like Mr Law are too …
 
Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has gone from boasting about progress to battling protests as the country’s contact-tracing programme has been overwhelmed. Early and extreme seasonal floods in China have already displaced nearly 2m people, raising questions about the country’s grand river-management promises. And the boom in bedtime stories...for…
 
Oxford University is ahead in the race to develop a covid-19 vaccine that could halt the pandemic. Yet lead researcher, Professor Sarah Gilbert, says some trial results may be delayed owing to changing virus transmissions in different countries. Also, navigating the sky with diamonds. And, why sewage can help census-takers. Kenneth Cukier hosts. Pl…
 
Oxford University is ahead in the race to develop a covid-19 vaccine that could halt the pandemic. Yet lead researcher, Professor Sarah Gilbert, says some trial results may be delayed owing to changing virus transmissions in different countries. Also, navigating the sky with diamonds. And, why sewage can help census-takers. Kenneth Cukier hosts. Pl…
 
It remains unclear whether influence and misinformation campaigns have had significant effects on Britain’s institutions, or its elections—but only because successive administrations chose not to look. For decades, Myanmar was a heroin supplier to the world; now a methamphetamine-production boom has created a domestic mess, too. And spotting the br…
 
TikTok, a video-sharing app, is caught up in the US-China clash. Can the firm restructure itself to address concerns over privacy and security? Also, why the pandemic has meant some households are awash with cash. And, a question of judgment. Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: …
 
TikTok, a video-sharing app, is caught up in the US-China clash. Can the firm restructure itself to address concerns over privacy and security? Also, why the pandemic has meant some households are awash with cash. And, a question of judgment. Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: …
 
After days of gruelling debate, European leaders have agreed a recovery plan. It includes, for the first time, taking on collective debt—to the tune of hundreds of billions of euros. Jihadism has been growing in Africa’s Sahel region; now it’s spilling into neighbouring states. In one of them, Burkina Faso, a charity is helping prisoners break out.…
 
As Congress reconvenes and covid-19 rages largely unabated, the biggest question is how much to prop up the economy—and how to get past partisan rancour about it. With slumping oil prices and a pile of long-term worries, the oil-and-gas industry is looking to offload its dirtiest, most difficult assets. And international polling data suggest that m…
 
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