show episodes
 
accessAtlanta is a new podcast that shares the best things to do, see, eat and experience in Atlanta. We’ll bring you the stories that make our eclectic city one of a kind, and take you behind the scenes in a town where we create movies, music and art making waves around the world. Every week, we’ll share with you some of the best places to eat, play, and live out loud in the ATL. Join us and let us be your guide to a city that we know best.
 
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show series
 
This week, we’ll hear from the AJC’s dining editor Ligaya Figueras and contributor Wendell Brock. Our dining team will be talking about some of the interesting things that are happening in Atlanta’s dining scene and how that’s affecting the AJC’s dining coverage. And, if you love tacos (and who doesn’t?), you won’t want to miss this week’s episode.…
 
Joseph Ferguson, host of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution In Context, Spoke to Carl Herder. Carl is The Atlanta Director for the American Institute of Stuttering. During their conversation, Carl speaks about the institute’s approach to speech therapy, accessibility, and so much more.By The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
 
When Jennifer K.N. Heinmiller inherited the million-word project that would become the “Dictionary of Southern Appalachian English,” its principal author had blown past several deadlines, lost his publisher and then died. The dictionary was a unique but expensive undertaking. It represented 85 years of research that would eventually produce a 1,225…
 
This week, we’ll talk about the Alliance Theatre’s season premiere. Live theater has been one of the major casualties of the pandemic, but this fall, many local companies are venturing back into live productions with audiences in attendance. The Alliance Theatre will be among them, kicking things off with “Darlin’ Cory,” an Appalachian-set new musi…
 
Former Atlantan David Bruckner’s second feature film, “The Night House” was picked up by Searchlight Pictures for a reported $12 million after its January 2020 Sundance Film Festival world premiere. At its center is a smart, determined schoolteacher whose architect husband has checked out of a seemingly happy marriage by committing suicide. Now she…
 
Criminal Records, located in Little Five Points, is celebrating a milestone this weekend. They’ve been supplying music lovers with CDs, vinyl, comics and more for 30 years. Atlanta is a town that’s rich in record stores, and many of them have been around for a very long time. Criminal’s anniversary puts them in the esteemed company. Find out what k…
 
Dogwood blossoms came and went last year, and there was no Atlanta Dogwood Festival to celebrate their arrival. Typically, thousands fill Piedmont Park to shop for sculpture, paintings and jewelry but also to eat and enjoy live entertainment during the three-day showcase each April. But the annual arts and music event was yet another of the city’s …
 
Hidden all over the South are structures that once powered a renaissance in Black America. Some are modest, two-room clapboard structures. Others are three-story brick buildings. All were built through a unique partnership between white mail-order magnate Julius Rosenwald and Black educator and leader Booker T. Washington. Atlanta photographer Andr…
 
Entering the digitally-animated “Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience” is less like walking into a painting and more like stepping into an IMAX fever dream. In a room the size of a railroad barn, painterly trains come and go, filling the interior with images of soft gray smoke. Flowering almond trees shed their petals on the breeze, and reach to the …
 
As the nation reeled from video of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the subsequent protests, Time magazine ran a searing cover image capturing the moment. A painting of a young black girl in silhouette led the double issue, titled “America Must Change.” Atlanta artist Charly Palmer was commissioned by Time’s artistic director to render …
 
There is so much inherent joy in “Girls5eva.” From the pitch-perfect skewering of ’90s-era pop groups to the goofy charms of the now-foursome who comprise the group, “Girls5eva” is one of the best new shows of 2021. And the glossy sitcom was just renewed for a second season. Check out Melissa Ruggieri's interview with one of the show’s producers an…
 
Looking for something sweet to do? Imagine a cross between Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory and a traveling circus. Well, that’s Candytopia. After two years away, the candy-themed, interactive art exhibition is back in Atlanta, bigger and better than ever before. Terry Baddoo visited the exhibition and spoke with CEO John Goodman.…
 
Sometimes artists are so popular that radio plays their singles and fans buy them because of unyielding devotion, not artistic genius. The diehard fans might love them all, but the rest of us see things a little differently. Melissa Ruggieri and Radio and TV Talk blogger Rodney Ho recently compiled a list of their least favorite songs from some maj…
 
The AJC’s dining team is taking a look at the changes to Atlanta’s dining landscape with a package they’re calling Restaurant Reset. It includes some of their top picks for patios, to-go cocktails, pop-ups, grocery store-restaurant hybrids and new brunch spots. Dining editor Ligaya Figueras is joined by AJC food and dining contributor and fellow re…
 
This week, we’ll hear from musical theater and film phenomenon Lin-Manuel Miranda. Miranda’s “In the Heights” finally makes its way to movie theaters this week, and it will also be available to stream for a limited time on HBO Max. Miranda spoke with the AJC’s Melissa Ruggieri recently about the movie and its long journey from the stage to the scre…
 
From Buckhead galleries where works run into the five digits to scruffier indie art spaces populated by Gen Z-types in mom jeans, Atlanta gallery owners can sometimes seem more anxious to chew the fat about the art on the walls than sell it. Hospitality and accessibility are hallmarks of Atlanta’s art scene, which makes it easy to dip a toe in, no …
 
From Buckhead galleries where works run into the five digits to scruffier indie art spaces populated by Gen Z-types in mom jeans, Atlanta gallery owners can sometimes seem more anxious to chew the fat about the art on the walls than sell it. Hospitality and accessibility are hallmarks of Atlanta’s art scene, which makes it easy to dip a toe in, no …
 
Where does your food come from? Sure, ultimately, you might be getting it from a grocery store or maybe even a farmer’s market, but before it gets there, someone had to cultivate it, grow it, get it ready for that market. The AJC is taking a look at some of the Georgia folks providing our food with the Georgia on My Plate series. On this week’s pod…
 
From his first Top 10 country hit in 1989 — “Country Club” — through a spate of No. 1 songs, Travis Tritt has been a defining voice in country music. On May 7, the Marietta-born Tritt released “Set in Stone." Melissa Ruggieri recently visited Tritt for a chat about his career, his life and the new album, and she’ll bring us that conversation on thi…
 
Stephen Schwartz, who wrote the songs for “Pippin,” “Godspell” and “Wicked,” is one of the most successful composer/lyricists in theater. (And in movies, considering his success writing songs for “Enchanted,” “Prince of Egypt,” and other films.) He recently sat with the AJC to talk about the upcoming movie version of “Wicked” and the Alliance produ…
 
What makes a hit song memorable is often how it evokes big emotions. On much rarer occasions, a tune gets released to the universe to evoke a chuckle, a raised eyebrow, or even a “what is that doing on the radio, and why do I like it?” And those are the songs we’ll be talking about this week, as Melissa Ruggieri and Rodney Ho offer up some of their…
 
Bassist Daniel Gleason of Grouplove has resided in Atlanta since 2006, but the evolution of the band into a predominantly Atlanta-based outfit is new. Since 2011, Grouplove has churned out a flow of colorful alt-pop. Their biggest hit, “Tongue Tied,” from their debut album, was certified triple platinum, and their chart presence continued through t…
 
April is National Poetry Month. Amanda Gorman’s powerful reading at January’s presidential inauguration gave a boost to an artform that is often neglected by mainstream culture. At the same time, The New York Times published a poem by Atlanta’s Jericho Brown. To mark National Poetry Month, the AJC’s Bo Emerson and Rosalind Bentley have teamed up to…
 
This week, we’ll hear about a new documentary celebrating former President Jimmy Carter, Georgia’s only president. Two brothers from Peachtree City have dedicated a couple years to gathering insights of politicians, historians, journalists and educators in a film that examines arguably the world’s most famous peanut farmer. “Carterland” will premie…
 
This week, we’ll take a look at ways to explore Atlanta’s musical history. They’re a little different than the Fountain of Rings at Centennial Olympic Park or the Big Chicken in Marietta, but musical landmarks around the city — and state —maintain their own charm. The continued growth of the music industry in the city and region, coupled with its p…
 
This week, we’ll take a look at some options for spring break. This year will mark a second spring break during the pandemic, so things are still far from normal. But that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy that time off. Freelance writer Nina Reeder talked with a few Georgians to find out how they’re spending their break, whether at home or away. She’ll …
 
This week, we revisit the subject of our very first podcast. Back in 2018, we launched the accessAtlanta podcast with an interview with the Zac Brown Band’s John Driskell Hopkins. The AJC’s Melissa Ruggieri spoke with him about his work, which included an upcoming solo album. And now, 160-something episodes later, we hear from Hopkins again as that…
 
This week we’re talking about the Grammy Awards. The Grammys will look very different this year. Like most other awards shows, the ceremony will be virtual. It’s also coming a bit later than usual, having been moved from its original late January date. Join us as Melissa Ruggieri and Shane Harrison discuss the nominees, the scheduled performances a…
 
This week we’ll hear from one of the architects of Memphis soul. While many of the Stax Records originators are gone, William Bell is still here. And the soulful, horn-driven Stax music and the Memphis sound are still here, too. Now Bell, 81 and an Atlanta resident, is being honored as a creator of the soul that put Memphis in the pantheon of Ameri…
 
Like all forms of art and culture, the visual arts have had to find new ways to do things. This week, we’ll hear from one artist who has a new show that is going the virtual route. Photographer Keris Salmon’s new exhibition “To Have and To Hold” is part of her series exploring the legacy of slavery through landscapes, architecture and text. This ex…
 
This week, we’ll hear from a decluttering expert and TV host who now lives in Georgia. Matt Paxton, formerly of the A&E show “Hoarders,” now hosts a show on PBS called “Legacy List With Matt Paxton.” The Suwanee resident rummages through collectibles and heirlooms found in attics, cellars and closets, helping baby boomers pare down their stuff as t…
 
This week, we’ll talk about love songs as we approach Valentine’s Day. Whether it’s a day of celebration, an occasion for cynicism or sadness or simply a day you like to ignore, we’ve got a song to fit your mood. Melissa Ruggieri joins us on this week’s podcast to talk about sweet songs of love, and the songs of heartbreak that sometimes go along w…
 
Andreas Delfs has just been named the new Music Director of your Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra , and he has a long and ambitious agenda for the organization as it heads into its centenary year. Julia Figueras sat down with Maestro Delfs in an empty Restaurant Good Luck to talk with him about that to-do list, with a speed round to wrap it up.…
 
This week, we offer up a few ideas for wintertime fun. Winter is often the time when we cherish quiet weekends inside, cuddled up in our favorite blankets, binge-watching movies and comforted with take-out and wine. But, if you’re looking for ways to get out of the house in these colder months, freelance writer Nina Hemphill Reeder will bring us a …
 
This week, we hear from the artist who created one of the city’s finest monuments to the late Henry ‘Hank’ Aaron. Jan. 22 was a sad day for sports fans, for Atlanta and for the world. One of baseball’s all-time greats, Henry “Hank” Aaron, died at age 86. The homer hero has been honored in many ways, for his work both on the field and off, and one o…
 
This week, we’ll visit some exceptional Atlanta landmarks. We all know that metro Atlanta is a one-of-a-kind place, but there are some things here that are especially noteworthy as the oldest or the first. True landmarks. For a boost of civic pride, join us for this week’s podcast as we discuss a few of these Atlanta originals with freelance writer…
 
This week, we take a look ahead into 2021. For the arts and entertainment, both locally and nationally, it has been a tough year. We miss going to concerts. Touring companies of Broadway hits have shut down their road shows. Even the movie and TV industry have felt the impact, as production became both more expensive and more difficult. Will 2021 b…
 
This week, we take a look ahead into 2021. For the arts and entertainment, both locally and nationally, it has been tough year. Theaters and playhouses remained dark or shifted to virtual-only performances. Concert halls were empty, though some performers shifted to drive-in concerts and online performances. Museums and galleries closed their doors…
 
This week, we take a look back at 2020. Because life changed so much this year, we had to change how we did things. Suddenly, there were no events, concerts or live theater to tell you about, but there was no shortage of news. There was still plenty to do, but we were doing a lot more of it from our homes. As this truly strange and remarkable year …
 
This week, we talk about a virtual visual arts show. Like everything else, the visual arts have felt the impact of the pandemic. It’s made it more difficult to see the work in person, but it’s also prompted museums and galleries to expand online access. This week, we’re talking about the work of Dawn Williams Boyd, whose work you can actually see i…
 
This week, we talk about the year in music with Melissa Ruggieri. The pandemic has had a major impact on everything this year, and the recording industry is no exception. Despite all of the obstacles and upheaval, 2020 was a pretty good year for music, at least the recorded variety. Live music is a different and more troubling story. Take a look ba…
 
This week accessAtlanta looks at that staple of the holidays, “The Nutcracker.” The season wouldn’t be the same without a performance of this dream-like tale by the Atlanta Ballet, but this year posed some challenges. Atlanta’s nationally recognized troupe devised a variety of solutions – including a drive-in “Nutcracker” – to get around the pandem…
 
This week, we’ll take a look at some food-inspired ways to make this unusual holiday season a little brighter. Thanksgiving has come and gone, and for some, it was bittersweet without in-person gatherings with loved ones. Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and New Year’s Eve also might not have the usual bevy of family and friends. So, how can we keep th…
 
This week, the AJC’s Melissa Ruggieri pays a visit to Chuck Leavell and gets a glimpse of his dual life as a rock keyboardist and a tree farmer, which is also explored in the new documentary, “The Tree Man.” When he isn’t onstage with the Rolling Stones or working on albums with John Mayer or the Allman Betts Band, Chuck Leavell isn’t a rock star, …
 
This week, we look at the music of television. Television show theme songs have a powerful nostalgic effect. They can transport us back to an earlier time, and remind us of those days. When there were only three networks and a few dozen shows, these songs became so deeply entrenched in the landscape, almost anyone of a certain age could sing the ly…
 
In this bonus episode of accessAtlanta, guest host Melissa Ruggieri discusses the 51st running of the AJC Peachtree Road Race. Atlanta Track Club executive director Rich Kenah joins the podcast to discuss the race’s switch to virtual as well as logistics for the event, which is set to take place from Nov. 26 to Nov. 29.…
 
This week, we look at an unusual local music success story. Foxes and Fossils, a homegrown cover band from Smyrna, has never released a commercial record. They’ve never gone on tour. Their promotion has occurred — almost accidentally — by word of mouth. They began 10 years ago with a performance in a pizza parlor and haven’t progressed much from th…
 
This week, we take a look at a new box set of recordings by one of Athens' most influential bands. Back in 2009 following the death of Pylon’s guitarist Randy Bewley, the B-52s' Fred Schneider told the AJC, “To me, Pylon was the best band to ever come out of Athens. It still is.” Now, more than 40 years after the band’s debut single “Cool”/"Dub," P…
 
Movies being released to theaters is still a rarity these days, but one that will hit the big screen is “Spell.” Omari Hardwick stars in this tale of dark magic and sinister ritual that is being released just in time for Halloween. The movie will also be available on video-on-demand on Oct. 30. In this week's episode of accessAtlanta, AJC reporter …
 
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