show episodes
 
From the Norman Invasion to the War of Independence, the Irish History Podcast brings you on a journey through the most fascinating stories in Ireland's past. Whether it’s the siege of Dublin in 1171 or gun battles in the 1920s, the podcast vividly recreates a sense of time and place. Each episode is meticulously researched creating character driven narratives that are engaging and accessible for all. Since the first episode was released back in 2010, the podcast has covered scores of fascin ...
 
This podcast is part of the Carlow County Council Decade of Centenaries Programme and is a collaborative podcast series on the history of Carlow during the decade 1913 -1923. Collaborators on the project include Carlow County Museum, Carlow Historical and Archaeological Society and Carlow County Library Service.
 
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show series
 
When you think of the Middle Ages what springs to mind? Medieval battles, warfare and general hardship? Certainly not fun. However while medieval Ireland was a violent place by any standard people were still able to enjoy themselves. In this episode I explore what our medieval ancestors did for fun. From football to archery, poetry to the pub they …
 
Traditional music is central to Irish culture and identity in the 21st century. Contrary to what we might think, this is a relatively recent development. As late as the 1960s Trad was perceived as unfashionable and musicians were not allowed to play in pubs. 60 years later it has become extremely popular and recognised the world over. So what happe…
 
This live podcast pokes in to the darker corners of the past looking at life in Victorian Waterford. Recorded live in Katty Barry’s in Waterford, it's a strange journey through macabre inquests that took place in pubs through to dentists who peddled cocaine! The second half of the podcast looks at a bizarre murder involving a veteran of the Famine.…
 
Stephen’s Green is one of Dublin’s well known areas. Located in the heart of the city centre, the Green is home to several prestigous instiutions and businesses including the Royal College of Surgeons, the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Shelbourne Hotel. It's history however is very different. Originally a swampy marshland, it was home to nu…
 
Adam Kane is a BA Hons. Graduate of Carlow College, and is currently engaged in further study in the History Department at Trinity College. In this podcast, with Carlow Libraries’ John O’Gorman, Adam discusses the findings of his study of the R.I.C. in the county, and how it compared with others, namely Kilkenny and Cork. The role of, and attitudes…
 
Irland Redaktion was a Nazi radio station established during the Second World War. It's sole purpose was to shape and influence Irish public opinion in favour of the Nazis. In this episode I am joined by William Quinlan, the winner of the Irish History Summit RSR competition. William, a stuident in St Jospeph's College Borrisoleigh, wrote his R.S.R…
 
What did Dublin look like before the authorities demolished the medieval city? How did Irish people address Queen Victoria during the Famine? The answers to these questions lie in documents stored in Dublin City Library's archives which chronicles 800 years of life in the city. Until now the only way to access the archive and it's fascinating stori…
 
Its National Tree Week! In this special episode brought to you by Wolfgang Reforest, I investigate the history of Ireland's woodlands and forests. The show begins by looking what an actual native Irish woodland because woodlands and forests looked very different in the past. Then we embark on a journery through 12,500 years of our history. From the…
 
In 1888 Ireland's most unusual railway, the Lartigue monorail, opened for business. Although largely forgotten, the story of this unique train is intriguing. Operating between the 1880s and the 1920s, it carried everything from tourists to livestock. This show (recorded in Listowel, Co Kerry) explains how this train inspired by camels in the Sahara…
 
Grace O'Malley or Granuaile is an iconic name in Irish history. Born in 1530, she emerged as a powerful leader in the West of Ireland in ruthless and violent era as the Tudor reconquest of the Island was in full swing. Grace is often called a pirate queen, a chieftain or even in some tellings a queen of the west. In this episode I interview her bio…
 
This episode forms part of the Carlow County Council’s Decade of Centenaries Podcast Series, which is presented by Carlow Libraries, Carlow County Museum, Carlow Historical and Archaeological Society, Carlow College, St. Patrick’s, Carlow County Council and the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media. The Decade of Centenar…
 
We've made it! This is the final episode in the War of Independence series. The episode begins as Michael Collins and an Irish negotiating team lock horns with Lloyd George and Winston Churchill in London. When a controversial treaty is agreed we return to Dublin to see how it is received. The show also includes extensive recreations of the famous …
 
This is the first of three episodes which will be released over the next 8 days to conclude the War of Independence Series. Endgame I is a fast moving show that takes you back to Cork in the opening weeks of 1921. The war develops a new ferocity with the declaration of martial law. The episode is based around one of the enduring controversies of th…
 
Tom Crean was born outside Anascaul, Co. Kerry in 1877. One of eleven children from a small farming family, Crean grew up in a world where Antarctica was still a largely unknown continent. Although overlooked by history, Crean went on to become one of the most distinguished Antarctic explorers of his age. Over the course of his life he would play a…
 
Imagine radio had existed during the Great Famine. What would it sound like if you could go to an archive and listen to news reports from 1847? To mark the 150th Anniversary of the Great Hunger in 1997, BBC Merseyside created news reports as if their journalists were reporting live from 1847. With the permission of BBC Merseyside I am delighted to …
 
The life of Nicholas Boran was extraordinary. Known as 'Nixie', he was born outside Castlecomer in Co Kilkenny in 1904. At the age of 18 he fought in the Civil War alongside Dan Breen in Tipperary. The harrowing violence he witnessed in the conflict permanently scarred him and challenges the romanticised myths that often surround the life of Dan Br…
 
One of the most important buildings in terms of Irish history or archaeology is located in North County Dublin. Strange as it may sound, this building is not very old. It actually only dates from the later 20th century and it was originally an electronics factory. However it is now owned by the National Museum of Ireland and houses millions of arti…
 
The Mary Celeste is one of the great mysteries of modern times. The ship was found abandoned in the Atlantic in 1872 and the ten people who had been onboard the vessel were missing. However everything else appeared normal. It has never been satisfactorily explained what provoked the crew to abandon the ship in mid winter far from any coast. This ep…
 
The Irish women Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby are known to history as the Ladies of Llangollen. In 1780 the two aristocrats caused controversy when they rang away together. They would spend the rest of their lives in Llangollen, a town in north Wales. For nearly 250 years their relationship has been the source of intense speculation. Some claim…
 
Last month I recorded a show at the Liverpool Irish Festival with Teresa Hill. Teresa is really passionate about her fascinating family history. Her father from was from Freetown in Sierra Leone while her mother's family were from Ireland. In this interview Teresa spoke candidly about her life. She grew up in a Liverpool where racism was common and…
 
Following on from the collapse of the Clune Peace talks in December 1920, the British Government adopted an even more aggressive attitude to the war. However as they prepared to escalate the conflict in 1921 some leading figures in the British military and political establishment suggested extreme measures. This episode reveals what were deeply ala…
 
Over the last three episodes of the War of Independence Series, we saw the Republican movement demonstrate an ability and willingness to fight on despite recent setbacks. This episode looks at how the British authorities reacted to these developments. While the immediate reaction was to declare martial law across the South West, there was also murm…
 
The Irish History Summit returns! Taking place on Saturday January 15th 2022 we have a great line up of historians and educational experts to prepare students for the Leaving Cert history exams. Headlining this year is the journalist and historian Leo Enright. He will be joined by Dr Sarah Anne Buckley, Dr Brian Hanley and Liz Gillis. We are also d…
 
Kilmichael is remembered as one of the most important and controversial battles in the War of Independence. This episodes explains what actually happened in this remote valley in Cork in late November 1920. The podcast also continues the wider story of the war through one of the most turbulent periods of the conflict. Beginning with dramatic attack…
 
November 21st, 1920 was one of the most violent days in the War of Independence. It has gone down in history as 'Bloody Sunday'. While this episode explains the days events, it also introduces the man who was arguably the most important republican in the conflict - the IRA director of Intelligence, Michael Collins. Get your tickets for my live show…
 
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