show episodes
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Welcome to Science Sessions, the PNAS podcast program. Listen to brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in PNAS, plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us.
 
John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
I love talking to people with PhDs. To me someone with a PhD is not that far removed from say an artist, musician or writer. They have chosen to explore a topic in-depth and become the leading authority in the world on that subject. So join me as we Pile it high and Deep with doctorates from around around the world as we explore their journey's their research and what they have done with all that knowledge they shoved into their brains.
 
In-depth conversations in applied geophysics from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). With new episodes monthly, Seismic Soundoff highlights industry leaders; emerging research and technology; the social contributions of geoscience; and the latest geophysical, environmental, and engineering applications.
 
Hey there! I'm the host Dillon Berger (@InertialObservr)--a PhD Student of Theoretical Particle Physics a UC Irvine. Join me as I track down some of the most interesting people on the internet, and discuss everything including Physics, Philosophy, Mathematics, and even UFOs. . We also take your questions, if you tune in Live! So grab a cold one wherever you are, and join us when the sun goes down for Physics After Hours.
 
Dr Judy L Mohr is a real doctor, but not a medical doctor. Nope… The Doc has a PhD in Astronomy on top of her Master in Engineering. She’s not ashamed to admit that she has spent far too long at school. But her love of science extends beyond the stars and machines. Ever wanted to know how the things worked but was confused by all the scientific terms. Come and take a seat as Dr Judy L Mohr explains the world around us in a way we can all understand. Welcome to Conversations in Science
 
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show series
 
In surprise news this week, the US government announced its support for waiving patent protections for COVID-19 vaccines, in an effort to boost supplies around the world.As fewer than 1% of people living in low-income countries have received COVID-19 vaccines, it is hoped that this move is a major step towards addressing this inequity by allowing m…
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with Margariete Malenda and Tiziana Vanorio on utilizing rock physics and geophysics to decarbonize the future.In this conversation, Margariete and Tiziana highlight the role of rock physics within geophysics, short- and long-term solutions to decarbonization, common misperceptions about decarbonization amo…
 
This month's “Third Pod from the Sun” episode is a special release, featuring AGU Vice President of Meetings Lauren Parr and AGU Vice President of Science Policy and Government Relations Lexi Shultz, hosted by AGU CEO Randy W. Fiser. In this episode, they talk about what is AGU, as an organization, doing to serve as an ally when it comes to our mee…
 
The earliest evidence of deliberate human burial in Africa, and a metal-free rechargeable battery. Listen to our mini-series ‘Stick to the Science’: when science gets political and vote for the show in this year’s Webby Awards. In this episode: 00:44 Human burial practices in Stone Age Africa The discovery of the burial site of a young child in a K…
 
How do geysers work? Learn more this week! Old Faithful Fun Paper Friday The title says it all in this week's Fun Paper! Wang, Lu, Zdenek Sofer, and Martin Pumera. "Will any crap we put into graphene increase its electrocatalytic effect?." ACS nano 14.1 (2020): 21-25. Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.dontpanicgeocast.com SWUNG Slack @don…
 
For more than a century, public health researchers have demonstrated how poverty and discrimination drive disease and the coronavirus pandemic has only reinforced this. In a Coronapod special, Nature reporter Amy Maxmen takes us with her through eight months of reporting in the San Joaquin valley, a part of rural California where COVID's unequal to…
 
Ultra-precise measurements connect brain activity and energy use in individual fruit-fly neurons. Vote for our mini-series ‘Stick to the Science’: when science gets political in this year’s Webby Awards. In this episode: 00:45 How brain cells use energy A team of researchers have looked in individual fruit-fly neurons to better understand how energ…
 
Despite warnings, and a number of close calls, drugmakers failed to develop and stockpile drugs to fight a viral pandemic. Now, in the wake of SARS-CoV-2, they are pledging not to make the same mistake again. Around the world, researchers are racing to develop drugs to target COVID-19, but also broad-spectrum antivirals that could be used to treat …
 
As COVID-19 vaccine roll-outs continue, attentions are turning to one group: children. While research suggests that children rarely develop severe forms of COVID-19, scientists still believe they could play a key role in transmission and a plan needs to be in place for the longer term. But clinical trials in children are more complicated than those…
 
The self-supporting structures that snap into place, and how a ban on fossil-fuel funding could entrench poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. In this episode: 00:45 Self-supporting, foldable structures Drawing inspiration from the art of origami, a team of researchers have demonstrated a way to design self-supporting structures that lock into place after…
 
If someone offered you the chance to drop everything, fly to Hawaii, and spend four months trapped in a dome with seven strangers in the name of science, would you do it? For writer Kate Greene, the answer to that question was a resounding “yes.” Greene was one of eight people selected to crew the very first HI-SEAS Mars analogue mission in 2013. I…
 
The journey of a PhD in Nursing is certainly unique due to the fact there is an element of direct work experience required before moving onto graduate education. Dr. Linda Franck did not plan to become as she started college and she certainly wasn't expecting to get a PhD. The career of a nurse is varied and Dr. Franck talks about the options avail…
 
Reports of rare and unusual blood clots have resulted in several vaccine roll outs being paused while scientists scramble to work out if the vaccines are responsible and if so how. The unusual combination of symptoms, including a low platelet count and clots focussed in the abdomen or brain, seems similar to a rare side effect from treatment with t…
 
How do you identify a mineral? We talk about our favorite ways to identify minerals! Fun Paper Friday How does heavy water taste? Will it kill you? Find out by reading this week's Fun Paper Friday! Abu, Natalie Ben, et al. "Sweet taste of heavy water." Communications Biology 4.1 (2021): 1-10. Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.dontpanicgeo…
 
In this special episode, Seismic Soundoff features SEG’s humanitarian program, Geoscientists Without Borders (GWB). We highlight Silvio De Angelis’s project to create an international partnership to develop volcano monitoring capacities in Guatemala.In Guatemala, volcanic hazard is high with over 1.3 million people living within six miles of an eru…
 
The lack of adequate sanitation in parts of the rural US, and physicists reassess muons’ magnetism. In this episode: 00:45 How failing sanitation infrastructure is causing a US public health crisis In the US, huge numbers of people live without access to adequate sanitation. Environmental-health advocate Catherine Coleman Flowers tells us about her…
 
Gary McManus joins us to talk about state climatology and extremes in Oklahoma! Gary Mesonet Fun Paper Friday Hurricanes in space? It's raining electrons in this week's fun paper Friday! Zhang, Qing-He, et al. "A space hurricane over the Earth’s polar ionosphere." Nature communications 12.1 (2021): 1-10. Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.…
 
Rick Bright exposed former president Trump's political meddling in the US COVID response. Now he is championing a new privately funded initiative to track viral spread and combat new variants. We discuss the challenges of collecting data on a rapidly spreading virus, from transmission dynamics to genomic surveillance. We also ask why a veteran gove…
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with John Bradford on SEG's recent statement on climate change. John led the Climate Change Task Force charged with creating a statement for SEG. The SEG Board adopted the position statement in a unanimous vote during its January 2021 meeting.In this conversation, John provides an overview of SEG's position…
 
In 2020, the artificial intelligence (AI) GPT-3 wowed the world with its ability to write fluent streams of text. Trained on billions of words from books, articles and websites, GPT-3 was the latest in a series of ‘large language model’ AIs that are used by companies around the world to improve search results, answer questions, or propose computer …
 
Thanks to Dr. Maciej Obryk, Dr. Kate Allstadt, and Dr. Thomas Rapstine for joining us to talk about the USGS experimental flume! Flume Experiment Videos Dr. Maciej Obryk Dr. Kate Allstadt Dr. Thomas Rapstine Fun Paper Friday This week we see how an undergarment can become a lifesaving bit of technology. EBbra Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon!…
 
From a sore arm to anaphylaxis, a wide range of adverse events have been reported after people have received a COVID-19 vaccine. And yet it is unclear how many of these events are actually caused by the vaccine. In the vast majority of cases, reactions are mild and can be explained by the body's own immune response. But monitoring systems designed …
 
The leap from dancing, specifically belly dancing, to a PhD in Speech Communication is really not too far. Especially once you hear the story of how Sandra Halvorson, PhD took the journey. Sure; there was the family, the dance and exercise school, living in Minnesota then Florida. But in the end it all really kind of makes sense; because after all …
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with Mohamed Ahmed on geophysical test sites.In this conversation, Mohamed highlights the importance of field exercises, why geophysical test sites can act as a competitive advantage, and the many ways test sites can be used by students and companies (for free). This conversation showcases the importance of…
 
Laser-cooled antimatter opens up new physics experiments, and the staggering economic cost of invasive species. In this episode: 00:44 Cooling antimatter with a laser focus Antimatter is annihilated whenever it interacts with regular matter, which makes it tough for physicists to investigate. Now though, a team at CERN have developed a way to trap …
 
Since the beginning of the pandemic the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine has been plagued by confusion and controversy. The vaccine has been authorised in over 100 countries, tens of millions of doses have been administered, and it has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. However, over the past few weeks the vaccine has again been in the headlines…
 
Field Kit Sokkia Notebook Holster/Backpack Handlens Hammer Belt Pocket Transit Gilson Grain Size Card Acid Bottle Pocket Knife Pencils/Lead Protractor Ruler Combo Streak Plate Mohs Picks Fun Paper Friday What can we learn about the Earth's magnetic field from tree rings? Cooper, Alan, et al. "A global environmental crisis 42,000 years ago." Science…
 
A web of three optical atomic clocks show incredibly accurate measurements of time, and the trailblazing astronomer who found hints of dark matter. In this episode: 00:44 Optical clock network Optical atomic clocks have the potential to reach new levels of accuracy and redefine how scientists measure time. However, this would require a worldwide sy…
 
Many of us know that tree rings can tell us how old a tree is. But there’s so much more we can learn from these seemingly simple lines. In the mid 1800’s, right before the start of the U.S. Civil War, North America began to experience unusually low rainfall that lasted approximately 10 years. This drought, on par with the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s, m…
 
What's in the box? Geophones Load Cell Resistivity Setup Color Magnetometer Accelerometer Turbidity Sensor Water Velocity Sensor Fun Paper Friday What happens when no AI research can be reproduced? Any angry site to shame those authors! One researcher’s mission to encourage reproducibility in machine learning Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon!…
 
In the early days of the pandemic, researchers raced to identify the most potent antibodies produced by the immune system in response to SAR-COV-2 infection and produce them in bulk. The resulting ‘monoclonal antibodies’ have since been tested in a variety of settings as treatments for COVID-19. But despite promising clinical trial results and seve…
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with Ray Abma on his new book, Simultaneous Source Seismic Acquisition.This book introduces simultaneous source technology and helps those who practice it succeed. This work is written through the lens of decades of experience and allows readers to understand the development of independent simultaneous sour…
 
A computer that can participate in live debates against human opponents. In this episode: 00:43 AI Debater After thousands of years of human practise, it’s still not clear what makes a good argument. Despite this, researchers have been developing computer programs that can find and process arguments. And this week, researchers at IBM are publishing…
 
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