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Nature Podcast

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Nature Podcast

Springer Nature Limited

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The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
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Don't Panic Geocast

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Don't Panic Geocast

John Leeman and Shannon Dulin

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John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
Welcome to Science Sessions, the PNAS podcast program. Listen to brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in PNAS, plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us.
 
The Nature Medicine Podcast reports on cutting-edge news in biomedical research from around the globe. The program features interviews with experts and a review of the advances that scientists hope to translate from bench to bedside. Tune into the podcast to learn about breakthroughs and policy developments in medical research.
 
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Seismic Soundoff

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Seismic Soundoff

Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG)

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In-depth conversations in applied geophysics from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). With new episodes monthly, Seismic Soundoff highlights industry leaders; emerging research and technology; the social contributions of geoscience; and the latest geophysical, environmental, and engineering applications.
 
Toby decides to give her journal a break and talk about her life and experiences to every amazing person that's listening. I'll love to hear your unique experiences, thoughts and opinions. Please leave me a voice message or comments after listening. I'm on Twitter and Instagram as Toby Ude-Akpeh. Also contact me via email at tobyudeakpeh@gmail.com You can support me by tipping me @ Useshukran https://useshukran.com/cr/my%20name%20is%20toby Patreon https://www.patreon.com/MyNameIsToby
 
Dr Judy L Mohr is a real doctor, but not a medical doctor. Nope… The Doc has a PhD in Astronomy on top of her Master in Engineering. She’s not ashamed to admit that she has spent far too long at school. But her love of science extends beyond the stars and machines. Ever wanted to know how the things worked but was confused by all the scientific terms. Come and take a seat as Dr Judy L Mohr explains the world around us in a way we can all understand. Welcome to Conversations in Science
 
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show series
 
In a quickly developing story a new variant, first detected in Botswana, is triggering rapid action among researchers. The variant - currently named B.1.1.529 has more than 30 changes to the spike protein - and the concern is that these mutations may result in increased transmissibility, severity of disease or even antibody evasion. In this episode…
 
Paul was invited on a project in Iraq and has returned to tell us all about it. What was getting to Iraq like? How'd the preparation for photogrammetry go? We find out about the Lagash Archaeological Project and how the project went. Links Lagash Archaeological Project DroneDeploy DJI Phantom 4 RTK DJI D-RTK 2 Mobile Station Contact Chris Webster T…
 
The Nature salary and satisfaction survey reveals researchers' outlook, and NASA’s test of planetary defences. In this episode: 00:45 Salary and satisfaction survey Like all aspects of life, scientific careers have been impacted by the pandemic. To get an insight into how researchers are feeling, Nature has conducted a salary and satisfaction surve…
 
In 1959, the United States built an unusual military base under the surface of the Greenland ice Sheet. Camp Century was a hub for scientific research, but it also doubled as a top-secret site for testing the feasibility of deploying nuclear missiles from the Arctic. When Camp Century was decommissioned in 1967, its infrastructure and waste were ab…
 
A recent publication tried to determine if strange folded glasses found in the Atacama Desert formed by an extraterrestrial process. Turns out, mineraology and microscopy hold the key! Schultz, Peter H., et al. "Widespread glasses generated by cometary fireballs during the late Pleistocene in the Atacama Desert, Chile." Geology (2021). Fun Paper Fr…
 
SEG President Anna Shaughnessy discusses the major challenges and decisions facing the SEG and the geosciences in the years ahead.In this episode, Anna discusses the recently formed Strategic Options Task Force addressing possible collaboration with other societies. She also highlights the new JEDI Committee (Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusi…
 
Spineless sea squirts shed light on vertebrate evolution, and an iodine-fuelled engine powering a satellite in space. In this episode: 00:45 A story of sea squirts, ancient vertebrates and missing genes When a PhD student set out to study the developmental pathways of a strange sea creature, he hoped to shed light on the origins of vertebrate anima…
 
Two new anti-viral pills have been shown to be safe and effective against COVID in clinical trials, according to recent press releases. The drugs, molnupiravir, developed by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, and Paxlovid, developed by Pfizer both appear to significantly reduce hospitalisation in people with early COVID. Some researchers are quie…
 
This week John and Shannon discuss sedimentary rocks and what holds them together. Cements can be made of many different materials and don't change the name of the rock! Fun Paper Friday What can we learn from ducks drafting while swimming? Yuan, Zhi-Ming, et al. "Wave-riding and wave-passing by ducklings in formation swimming." Journal of Fluid Me…
 
We've got a guest from Wildnote on today to talk about best practices when going in the field with your digital forms. There is some Wildnote feature stuff in here, but, most of this is applicable to anyone using digital recording devices in the field. Links Wildnote Article Email Rachel at Wildnote - rachel@wildnoteapp.com Contact Chris Webster Tw…
 
Mark Zoback discusses his Honorary Lecture, "Geomechanical Issues Affecting Long-Term Storage of CO2."In this episode, Mark highlights how oil and gas companies are best positioned to address the needs for large-scale carbon storage. He discusses the role of depleted oil and gas reservoirs for CO2 storage, as well as the geomechanical issues that h…
 
Reassessing 24,000 years of global temperatures, and on the ground at COP26. In this episode: 01:21 Reassessing Earth’s climate over the past 24,000 years The ~20,000 year period from the Last Glacial Maximum to the pre-industrial era saw huge changes to the Earth’s climate. But characterising how temperatures changed during this time has been diff…
 
Lake Kivu, nestled between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda, is a geological anomaly that holds 300 cubic kilometres of dissolved carbon dioxide and 60 cubic kilometres of methane. The lake has the potential to explosively release these gases, which could fill the surrounding valley, potentially killing millions of people. Researcher…
 
Weather balloons are one of the few ways to really get in-situ atmospheric measurements. John was over in Norman, OK working on a new balloon borne instrument. We talk about what all is involved in a launch! Launch Video Fun Papery Friday What do shark intestines have to do with the inventor of the AC motor? Find out! Leigh, Samantha C., et al. "Sh…
 
Vemund Thorkildsen discusses his paper, "Revisiting holistic migration," published in October's The Leading Edge.In this episode, Vemund discusses questioning the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem, mining gaps in past research, and examining the applicability of holistic migration to seismic field data. He also shares how he connected with Enders Ro…
 
Last weekend, hundreds of young people boarded a specially chartered train in Amsterdam to travel to Glasgow ahead of the United Nations COP26 climate summit. Among them were scientists, activists and policy makers. In a Nature Podcast special, we boarded the train to catch up with some of them - to talk about their science, their motivations and t…
 
More that 3 billions doses of China's CoronaVac and Sinopharm vaccines have been administered across the globe, playing an especially important role in Latin America and South East Asia, as well as China. These vaccines use inactivated virus particles to expose the immune system to Sars-CoV-2, but they do not appear to generate the same levels of n…
 
Paul and Chris talk about a Heritage Daily article that seems a bit starry-eyed about the role of archaeology in current and future technological innovations and use. The article linked below broadly discusses a number of technologies and we take a few of them and break them down. Links Why archaeology will be the next harbour for technology Drone …
 
The unexpected origins of a 4000-year-old people, protecting your ‘digital presence’ and what to expect from COP26. In this episode: 00:48 The origins of the mysterious Tarim mummies For decades there has been debate about the origins of a group of 4000-year-old individuals known as the Tarim Basin mummies. Their distinct appearance and clothing ha…
 
We’ve all heard stories about fantastical creatures that people swear they’ve seen and have evidence of but can never be confirmed. Think Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster. Mermaids or the Kraken. While there’s no evidence backing the existence of these creatures, either in present day or at any point in the past, there must be a reason why such leg…
 
People that have recovered from COVID are seeing stronger immune responses after vaccination than those that never contracted the virus. Researchers are now racing to unpick what is behind this powerful 'hybrid immunity'. In this episode of Coronapod, we discuss a series of studies which are offering up some possibile explanations, and ask how this…
 
What happens when the Earth is drastically warmer than it is now? How can it get that way? Join us to learn about the PETM and what it could mean for our future. Fun Paper Friday Can the Drake equation be applied to love? One author thinks so! Link is to a video of a talk on the paper - the original PDF seems to have disappeared from the university…
 
An ancient solar storm helps pinpoint when Vikings lived in the Americas, and using magnets to deftly move non-magnetic metals. In this episode: 00:53 Pinpointing Viking presence in North America It’s well-understood that Vikings went to North America around a thousand years ago. However, working out a precise date has proven difficult. Now, thanks…
 
Michael Burianyk discusses his new book, Understanding Amplitudes: Basic seismic analysis for rock properties.In the book, methods and techniques used to estimate rock properties from seismic data, based on an understanding of the elastic properties of materials and rocks and how seismic reflection amplitudes change, are described. Using AVO and ot…
 
Hundreds of scientists have responded to a survey asking about harassment and abuse during the pandemic. The results paint a picture which is as concerning as it is shocking. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss the kinds of abuse scientists are facing, try to pick apart where it is comes from and ask what can be done about it? News Feature: ‘I …
 
Trovants are a mysterious rock formation and we try to understand them this week! Science Alert Article When on Earth Article Wikipedia Article Geology In Article Fun Paper Friday Tired of zoom meetings? Let's read a paper about them! Shockley, Kristen M., et al. "The fatiguing effects of camera use in virtual meetings: A within-person field experi…
 
Archaeologists have been using digital technologies to augment traditional field archaeology for several decades (GPS and mapping mostly). However, as modern technologies continue to enter the archaeological space, most researchers are using these techniques almost as a second thought. The authors of this case study argue for development of a digit…
 
Henning Hoeber discusses a new tool for rock physics in his recent paper published in September's The Leading Edge.In this episode, Henning explains the theory of omitted variable bias (OVB) and its connection to rock physics, why OVB hasn't appeared before in the geoscience literature, how OVB helps geophysicists understand biases in models, the r…
 
The neurons behind acupuncture’s effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria. In this episode: 00:54 The neuronal basis for acupuncture’s effect on inflammation In mice, electroacupuncture has been shown to reduce inflammation, but only when certain points on the body are stimulated. Why this is has puzzled scientists, but now, …
 
We’ve all heard stories about fantastical creatures that people swear they’ve seen and have evidence of but can never be confirmed. Think Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster. Mermaids or the Kraken. While there’s no evidence backing the existence of these creatures, either in present day or at any point in the past, there must be a reason why such leg…
 
New data suggests that inexpensive, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters can effectively scrub SARS-CoV-2 particles from the air in hospital COVID wards. The result validates previous studies carried out in controlled conditions. Currently, HEPA filters are not routinely used in hospital settings, but researchers suggest they could could …
 
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