show episodes
 
John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Welcome to Science Sessions, the PNAS podcast program. Listen to brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in PNAS, plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us.
 
In-depth conversations in applied geophysics from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). With new episodes monthly, Seismic Soundoff highlights industry leaders; emerging research and technology; the social contributions of geoscience; and the latest geophysical, environmental, and engineering applications.
 
Dr Judy L Mohr is a real doctor, but not a medical doctor. Nope… The Doc has a PhD in Astronomy on top of her Master in Engineering. She’s not ashamed to admit that she has spent far too long at school. But her love of science extends beyond the stars and machines. Ever wanted to know how the things worked but was confused by all the scientific terms. Come and take a seat as Dr Judy L Mohr explains the world around us in a way we can all understand. Welcome to Conversations in Science
 
Hey there! I'm the host Dillon Berger (@InertialObservr)--a PhD Student of Theoretical Particle Physics a UC Irvine. Join me as I track down some of the most interesting people on the internet, and discuss everything including Physics, Philosophy, Mathematics, and even UFOs. . We also take your questions, if you tune in Live! So grab a cold one wherever you are, and join us when the sun goes down for Physics After Hours.
 
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show series
 
We’ve all heard stories about fantastical creatures that people swear they’ve seen and have evidence of but can never be confirmed. Think Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster. Mermaids or the Kraken. While there’s no evidence backing the existence of these creatures, either in present day or at any point in the past, there must be a reason why such leg…
 
This week National Weather Service Tulsa WFO Meteorologist In Charge Steve Piltz joins us to talk about a career in the weather service and finding unique ways to solve forecast problems! Fun Paper Friday Do ants count their steps to get home? Wittlinger, Matthias, Rüdiger Wehner, and Harald Wolf. "The ant odometer: stepping on stilts and stumps." …
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with author Vladimir Grechka on his latest book, Anisotropy and Microseismics: Theory and Practice.Vladimir highlights why anisotropy and microseismics are a great pairing, how the shift from P-waves to shear waves changed the industry, and reflects on what we will find in seismology books in the next decad…
 
The structure of a beetle’s super-strong exoskeleton could open up new engineering applications, and efforts to address diversity and equality imbalances in academia. In this episode: 01:17 Insights into an armoured insect The diabolical ironclad beetle has an exoskeleton so strong, it can survive being run over by a car. Researchers have identifie…
 
This week John and Shannon agree to talk about playas, only to discover that they think about very different things. Fun Paper Friday Man eating deer? Looks like it! Meckel, Lauren A., Chloe P. McDaneld, and Daniel J. Wescott. "White‐tailed deer as a taphonomic agent: photographic evidence of white‐tailed deer gnawing on human bone." Journal of for…
 
A high pressure experiment reveals the world’s first room-temperature superconductor, and a method to target ecosystem restoration. In this episode: 00:44 Room-temperature superconductivity For decades, scientists have been searching for a material that superconducts at room temperature. This week, researchers show a material that appears to do so,…
 
In this episode, the keynote address and SEG president's State of the Society address from the Opening Session at the 90th Annual Meeting hosted virtually for the first time in its history.First, the SEG President Rick Miller presents the State of the Society address, summarizing the year in applied geophysics and what to expect in 2021 at the Soci…
 
The latest episode of Third Pod from the Sun features an interview with planetary scientist Fran Bagenal, who has had a fascinating career working on NASA missions from Voyager to Juno and New Horizons. Currently working at the University of Colorado Boulder, Bagenal provides an overarching view of the different planetary missions going back a few …
 
This week we talk about machine learning - what is it exactly and how can we leverage it as geologists? Will it be as useful as the horta? Fun Paper Friday How do we know about Earth's past climate? Well, here are a few unusual ideas! Five Weird Climate Archives Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.dontpanicgeocast.com SWUNG Slack @dontpanic…
 
Researchers are aligning data on animal neuronal activity with behavioural information recorded on millisecond timescales, to uncover the signatures of internal brain states associated with things like moods and motivation. This is an audio version of our feature: Inside the mind of an animal See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informatio…
 
A conversation about the US election and the possible fallout for science, and are maternal behaviours learned or innate? In this episode: 00:46 US election In the United States the presidential race is underway, and Nature is closely watching to see what might happen for science. We speak to two of our US based reporters to get their insight on th…
 
How current and future ice loss in Greenland compares to the past, and using graphene to make ultra-sensitive radiation detectors. In this episode: 00:45 Greenland’s historic ice loss Climate change is accelerating the loss of ice and glaciers around the world leading to unprecedented levels of disappearance. Researchers have drilled samples from d…
 
This week we talk about analog experiments, what they are, and how you can do them! Geologists' Squeeze Box Squeeze Box Core Tubes Fun Paper Friday This week we do the worm! Find out how worms dance on speakers in this week's Fun Paper! Maksymov, Ivan S., and Andrey Pototsky. "Excitation of Faraday-like body waves in vibrated living earthworms." Sc…
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with SEG President Rick Miller to celebrate SEG's 90th birthday.Rick reflects on the milestones of the organization, the role of professional societies in 2020, how the digital transformation has impacted the field, and his future vision for applied geophysics. For long-time members and those just getting s…
 
Coaxing tiny colloid particles into a diamond structure, and manipulating cell death and homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease. In this episode: 00:45 Creating colloidal crystals For decades, researchers have attempted to create crystals with a diamond-like structure using tiny colloid particles. Now, a team thinks they’ve cracked it, which coul…
 
How did the Earth get its magnetic field? Why do we still have it? Find out that and more this week! Chris Finlay's Research Fun Paper Friday Can animals sense earthquakes? Can we sense animals sensing earthquakes? Wikelski, Martin, et al. "Potential short-term earthquake forecasting by farm-animal monitoring." bioRxiv (2020). Contact us: Show - Su…
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with Steve Sloan on smart city geophysics, the featured special section in September's The Leading Edge.Steve highlights the wide array of papers highlighting the tools and techniques used to achieve the best results in less than ideal environments. We discuss the importance of geophysics in urban settings,…
 
Mapping the migration of the Vikings, and the world’s smallest ultrasound device. In this episode: 00:45 Following the Viking footprint across Europe To better understand who the Vikings were, and where they went, researchers have mapped genomes from hundreds of archaeological artifacts. Research Article: Margaryan et al. 08:00 Coronapod Phase III …
 
Well-documented torrential rains and unusually cold temperatures affected the outcomes of many major battles during World War I from 1914 to 1918. Poet Mary Borden described the cold, muddy landscape of the Western Front as “the liquid grave of our armies” in her poem “The Song of the Mud” about 1916’s Battle of the Somme, during which more than on…
 
This week we talk about fronts and the warm air conveyor belt! Fun Paper Friday Do you think you have a good sense of direction? Maybe it's the magnetite in your brain! Researchers put brains in a magnetometer to find out! Human Brains Have Tiny Bits of Magnetic Material Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.dontpanicgeocast.com SWUNG Slack @…
 
Keeping electronics from overheating, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses. In this episode: 00:46 Cool computers Keeping components cool is a major hurdle when it comes to increasing electronic power. This week, we find out about a new way to integrate tiny microfluidic channels directly into circuits, to help keep them cool…
 
Engineering yeast to produce medicines, and the mechanism of anaesthetic action. In this episode: 00:44 Making medicine with yeast The tropane alkaloids are an important class of medicine, but they are produced agriculturally leaving them vulnerable to extreme weather and world events. Now, researchers have engineered yeast to produce these importa…
 
This week we talk about why we go to Antarctica and what kinds of work happens there each year! Fun Paper Friday What happens if you hold a cat in your dating profile photo? This important question answered by this week's fun paper! Kogan, Lori, and Shelly Volsche. "Not the Cat’s Meow? The Impact of Posing with Cats on Female Perceptions of Male Da…
 
Protecting delicate quantum bits, and a competition to replicate findings from ancient computer code. In this episode: 01:04 Quantum computers vs ionizing radiation The quantum bits, or ‘qubits’, central to the operation of quantum computers are notoriously sensitive. Now, researchers have assessed the damaging effects that ionizing radiation can h…
 
This week we talk about derechos - what are they and why did one sweep across the upper midwest bringing wide spread distruction? Find out that and how sword swallowers do what they do in this week's show! NWS Derecho Page Fun Paper Friday How to sword swallowers do it? Do they ever get injured? We touch on this pointy topic with a fun paper! Witco…
 
A new way to produce aerogels opens up their use, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids. In this episode: 01:05 Printing aerogels Aerogels are materials with impressive insulating properties, but they’re difficult to handle, due to their innate fragility. Now, researchers have shown a new way to 3D print the most common …
 
What happens when you cross medical science with geophysics?In one study published last year, the result was one-part interdisciplinary and one-part science fiction. Scientists have studied the presence of a magnetic mineral, magnetite, in organisms, but work on the human brain has been far and few between. Tiny chains of magnetite crystals in the …
 
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