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Take as Directed is the podcast series of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center. It highlights important news, events, issues, and perspectives in global health policy, particularly in infectious disease, health security, and maternal, newborn, and child health. The podcast brings you commentary and perspectives from some of the leading voices in global health and CSIS Global Health Policy Center in-house experts
 
Global Caveat is the podcast that explores the vast field of global health. Global health scientists Diana Klatt and Susanna Park discuss topics, such as research and fieldwork, with each other and guests to examine the connection between health and the sciences and how we have to work together for health, humanity, and the earth. Episodes are not endorsements for organizations discussed on the show. Music by Hawt Coco. Produced by Global Caveat, Inc.
 
We are in a period of tremendous global change. Our public institutions are struggling with challenges like climate change, cyber-attacks, terrorism, and pandemics. Resilient World features insight and analysis about how to meet these challenges from thought leaders in fields as diverse as national security, science fiction and public health. It highlights innovative ideas about how to prepare for, manage through and bounce back from adversity – in other words, how to be resilient.
 
Created by Phoenix-based Scientific Technologies Corporation (http://www.stchealth.com/), the Ideas Start Here podcast will serve as an ally in the fight against vaccine-preventable disease by aiding, educating and uplifting those on the front lines through info bytes, personal stories, and qualified expert commentary.
 
By the year 2050 we will have 10 billion people on our planet - a sixth of whom will be in India. If we want to feed all 10 billion of us in a sustainable, healthy and just way, we need to reimagine how we source our food. Feeding ourselves cannot come at the cost of global health, worsening greenhouse gas emissions, excessive land, water and resource use, zoonotic diseases, antibiotic resistance, and needless suffering. Last season, we brought you a ringside view of the next food revolution ...
 
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show series
 
After a decade of work, COVID-19 vaccines are the first RNA vaccines to be put through the paces of clinical trials. But what sets RNA vaccine technology apart from more traditional methods and how might this new platform be used going forward? Hopkins immunologist Dr. Diane Griffin talks with Stephanie Desmon about RNA vaccines, what they are and …
 
As part of the continuation of the series on racism as a public health crisis, Dr. Keshia Pollack Porter talks with Hopkins professor Dr. Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., and Dr. Marino A. Bruce, faculty at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, about the impacts of racism on black men’s health. They discuss what stands in the way of basic care for ma…
 
Prior to Thanksgiving, the city of Philadelphia announced new COVID-19 restrictions to last for six weeks until January 1—some of the strictest recommendations the country has seen since the spring. Health commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley talks with Stephanie Desmon about these targeted restrictions the city hopes will prevent the current surge from …
 
A renowned medical and public health voice of compassion, personal advice, pragmatism and vision, Dr. Leana Wen joined us for a tour d’horizon of the pandemic, at this moment of “explosive exponential growth.” Why is it so crucial today to have credible, trusted public health voices? Why have so many Americans disregarded the recent Thanksgiving wa…
 
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, rates of opioid overdose have increased dramatically but this is only due in part to disruption of services and increased isolation. Michael Botticelli, former head of the Office of National Drug Control Policy in the Obama administration and 32 years into his own recovery, talks with guest host Brendan Saloner abo…
 
How can people think about safety for holiday travel during the COVID-19 pandemic? Are some means of transport safer than others? What about safety during day-to-day transportation on school buses and trains? Dr. Mark Rosekind, a former administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and a Distinguished Policy Scholar at the Jo…
 
Last week, Nebraska ICU nurse Lacie Gooch recorded a video of herself after a long shift talking about the overwhelming number of people dying in hospitals from COVID-19. In a bonus episode of the podcast, Gooch talks with Stephanie Desmon about the viral video, and why frontline health care workers are taking to social media to describe the desper…
 
Last week, a judge approved the $8.3 billion settlement between the Department of Justice and OxyContin manufacturer Purdue Pharma. Hopkins opioids researcher Dr. Caleb Alexander talks with Stephanie Desmon about expected fallout from the settlement as well as how the COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating the crisis by disrupting drug markets, shutteri…
 
Steve and CSIS Senior Fellow Katherine Bliss enjoined Sir Andrew Witty to help us answer a few fundamental question: what exactly is this new, umbrella coalition, the ACT Accelerator; what is its value, six months after its creation; and what are its true prospects of success in battling hyper-nationalism and enhancing access by low and middle inco…
 
The Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs has worked for more than 30 years on health communication in at least 60 countries for issues like breastfeeding, HIV, and family planning. This experience meant they were well positioned to work with partners around the globe on messaging for COVID-19 prevention. Deputy director and COVID team le…
 
If you are like us you were part of the first generation of computer addicts and the gateway drug was Oregon Trail. A quiet little game where entire wagon trains died of dysentery faster than you could hit your mac II space bar. On this episode we dive into the diseases that kept every third grader up at night and how on earth we became known as th…
 
We sat down with Mike Osterholm, a member of President-Elect Biden’s Covid-19 Advisory Task Force, a renowned leader in global health security, director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP). What does he make of this “most dangerous period since the Spanish Flu in 1918,” fueled by “pandemic fat…
 
If I test positive for COVID-19, could my name and phone number be reported to the health department? How does closing bars at 10pm help? How will we know if COVID-19 vaccines work for children? My roommate and I have both tested positive—can we be in the same house together? Do I still have to wear a mask if I’ve recovered from COVID? Does mouthwa…
 
Pollution and racism go hand in hand: low-income, predominantly non-white communities with less capital and political power become dumping zones for hazardous waste and other toxic environmental exposures. As part of an ongoing series on structural racism and public health, Keshia Pollack Porter dives into the topic of environmental injustice with …
 
November 18 is the first National Injury Prevention Day. Injuries like burns, falls, and poisonings are the leading cause of death in the US for children over the age of 1 and most are preventable. Prevention experts Dr. Barbara Barlow, founder of a national coalition to prevent childhood injuries, Injury Free Coalition of Kids, and Eileen McDonald…
 
Denmark, one of world’s leading pelt producers, is culling all of its farmed mink after evidence that a different variant of SARS-CoV-2 might be circulating among the animals. Veterinary expert Dr. Meghan Davis returns to the podcast to talk with Stephanie Desmon about whether or not mink pose a danger to humans, what the news means for disease sur…
 
In this episode, we are joined by Dorothy Shea, the U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon, along with Jon Alterman, SVP/Director of the CSIS Middle East Program. The Covid-19 outbreak, kicked into high gear following the August 4 Beirut port explosion, is out of control and has triggered a new national lockdown. It is embedded in a web of economic, political …
 
Once COVID-19 vaccines are widely available, could they be made mandatory and, if so, what entities could enforce this? Legal and public health expert Joanne Rosen talks with Stephanie Desmon about the legislative precedent for mandatory vaccinations that dates all the way back to a 1905 Supreme Court case after a smallpox outbreak in Massachusetts…
 
Kaiser Permanente, the largest not-for-profit health system in the US, has mobilized in response to COVID-19. Senior vice president and chief health officer Dr. Bechara Choucair talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about coaching for patients who test positive, contact tracing partnerships with local health departments, and a focus on addressing patients…
 
This week, Pfizer reported some encouraging early results from Phase III of it’s COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials. Dr. Josh Sharfstein talks with Stephanie Desmon about what might happen next, when we could see the first doses of vaccines available, and how we should continue vigilance with masks, distancing, and handwashing while waiting for wides…
 
High profile instances show up in the news as “super spreader” events, but there’s evidence that the phenomenon of “overdispersion” could be much more common. Infectious disease epidemiologist Dr. Justin Lessler and doctoral student Kyra Grantz talk with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the biological and social contributors to overdispersion, and what it…
 
Pneumonia is the leading killer of children under 5 around the world with most deaths in low- and middle-income countries. But it’s not just a problem of developing countries: pneumonia is also the most common reason for hospitalization of children in the US. In recognition of World Pneumonia Day, pediatric infectious disease specialist Dr. Anita S…
 
We’re closer to safe, effective COVID-19 vaccines, but what will the actual rollout look like? Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, a bioethicist and health policy expert recently appointed to President-elect Joe Biden’s coronavirus task force, talks with Stephanie Desmon about the challenges in distributing a vaccine in the US. They discuss which groups might get…
 
After the National Basketball Association shut down on March 11, the league was able to resume play and complete both its season and postseason without interruption from COVID-19 from the safety of “the bubble.” Pete Meisel, the NBA’s senior manager for player health and an alumnus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, talks with …
 
How has COVID-19 impacted our ability to participate in our daily activities? How do health equity and systemic racism affect access to care and our occupations? In this episode, we talk with Dr. Khalilah Johnson about how occupational science is integral for our daily lives, how to access quality occupational therapy for your needs, and the import…
 
A disproportionate number of women in the U.S. appear to be “dropping out” of the workforce during the pandemic, presumably to care for children or because they are more likely to have jobs that cannot be done remotely. Stefania Albanesi, an economist at the University of Pittsburgh who studies women in the workforce, talks with Stephanie Desmon ab…
 
In this episode, Jono Quick opens with a sweeping overview of the history of faulty responses to pandemics -- why we “descend into the valley of complacency” so often? What are the essential steps to take now, modeled perhaps after the 9/11 Commission, to remember this profound moment? How do we transcend our divisions, borne of pandemic denial, pa…
 
Before the pandemic, we didn’t know as much about how infectious respiratory diseases spread. New knowledge about COVID-19 can help us make informed decisions about risks but it has also led to mixed messages. Hopkins environmental epidemiologist Dr. Tom Burke and dean of the University of Colorado School of Public Health Dr. Jon Samet talk with St…
 
The pandemic has revealed major deficits in public health infrastructure and a lack of prioritization of prevention efforts: only 3% of all health dollars are spent on prevention. Dr. Ellen J. MacKenzie, dean of the Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Dr. Shelley Hearne, director of the School’s Center for Public Health Advocacy, talk with guest…
 
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