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An official journal of the Genetics Society, Heredity publishes high-quality articles describing original research and theoretical insights in all areas of genetics. Research papers are complimented by News & Commentary articles and reviews, keeping researchers and students abreast of hot topics in the field.
 
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show series
 
The Population Genetics Group Meeting comes to Norwich this January (05th – 07th). In fact, it's coming to a lot of places. Tune in to find out how this beloved genetics conference is adapting to the COVID era with online talks, local meetups and “Twitter posters”. This episode features friend of the podcast Mike Pointer, one of this year’s PopGrou…
 
Can we really understand ancient shifts in oceanic currents by looking at the population genetics of migratory species? Find out in this episode, as Dr Jurjan van der Zee (University of Groningen) discusses his search for a warm-water corridor between the Atlantic and Indian oceans in the genomes of green turtles. In this episode we explore the rec…
 
Nile tilapia are the third most important farmed fish worldwide, but the emergence of the Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV) threatens its sustainable production. In this episode, Dr Agustin Barría (The Roslin Institute) discusses his recent collaboration, where they used a natural outbreak of TiLV to investigate the genetic architecture of disease resistan…
 
Red sea bream are an important fish in Japan, for both culinary and cultural reasons. But there’s a problem: transparent fish are appearing in fish farms! Join Dr Eitaro Sawayama (Nihon University) and find out how he uncovered the causative gene for this deformity, and what his work means for red sea bream aquaculture. In this episode we explore t…
 
After more than 150 years, wolves once again roam the Germany countryside! Of course, a lot has changed in that time. Join Anne Jarausch (Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum Frankfurt) as she discusses her recent work looking at the genetics of this ongoing, rapid and natural wolf recolonisation. In this episode we explore the…
 
Join us as we talk to the newest member of the Heredity editorial board: Prof. Sam Banks (Charles Darwin University). Discover his eclectic research tastes, hear about his recent Heredity paper on Australia’s threatened brush-tailed rabbit-rat, and be inspired by his passion for population genetics and ecology. This episode discusses the recent Her…
 
A scourge to many in agriculture, flour beetles in the genus Tribolium may be the best model system you’re not using. Join PhD student Michael Pointer, Prof. Matthew Gage and Dr Lewis Spurgin (University of East Anglia) as they discuss the importance of Tribolium beetles across a remarkable range of research fields… and their great untapped potenti…
 
Join Dr Milan Vrtílek (Czech Academy of Sciences) and Dr Pierre Chuard (Bishop's University) as they venture into the world of maternal effects – a form of inheritance that goes beyond genes. We also discuss the importance of preregistering studies for robust, reproducible science and explore the often-overlooked value in finding negative results. …
 
There are many ways to break a gene, and that’s not always a bad thing. In this episode Grey Monroe and Pádraic Flood discuss their recent paper on the population genomics of adaptive loss of function, and recount the unexpected origins of their collaboration. In this episode we explore the recent Heredity review article: “The population genomics o…
 
In this episode we revisit the nature vs. nurture debate in one of humanity's closest companions – Dogs! Why do they do the things they do? Are their behaviours hardwired into their DNA? Tune in and listen to Dr Juliane Friedrich, Dr Pamela Wiener and Dr Marie Haskell as they discuss complex genetic behaviour traits in German shepherd dogs and how …
 
Etched into the genomes of the humble house mouse are clues to some of the most important migrations in human history. Join Prof. Hitoshi Suzuki and Dr Naoki Osada (Hokkaido University) as they explain how they used the Eurasian house mouse, Mus musculus, to trace the prehistorical movement of ancient human populations. In this episode we explore t…
 
In this episode we explore the 54th Population Genetics Group Meeting with two of its organisers: Prof. Andrea Betancourt and Eve Taylor-Cox (University of Liverpool). We also hear from the winner of the best student talk: Gabriela Montejo-Kovacevic (University of Cambridge). Listen now to hear about great new research and the trials of hosting an …
 
Why did different sexes evolve? It’s a question as old as biology, but Prof. Dr Elvira Hörandl (University of Göttingen), with the help of biochemist Dr Franz Hadacek, may have discovered an important piece of the answer. In this episode we explore the recent Heredity review article: “Oxygen, life forms, and the evolution of sexes in multicellular …
 
When Jon Hale, a teacher at Beaulieu Convent School in Jersey, asked himself “how do we inspire the next generation of scientists?”, he came up with an incredibly ambitious plan. It involved a Royal Society Partnership Grant, daffodils, and some of the most cutting-edge genome sequencing technology available. In this episode Jon tells us about his …
 
In this episode we discuss the new Heredity Special Issue, Plant Quantitative Genetics: from Theory into Practice, with guest editors Dr Alison Bentley (CIMMYT) and Dr Lindsey Compton (University of Birmingham). Join us as we delve into the reviews, perspectives and research papers that explore the opportunities and applications of quantitative gen…
 
For over a century, inbred mice have been at the heart of genetics research. They are undoubtedly one of the most important models in all of biology. But are the mice from inbred lines really as genetically identical as often assumed? Find out in this episode as we hear from Dr Jobran Chebib and Prof. Peter Keightley (University of Edinburgh). See …
 
In September Heredity unveiled the winners of its first ever prize for best student-led paper. In this episode we explore this collection of outstanding research with the help of Emily Baker, The Genetics Society’s postgraduate representative, the overall winner, Donald McKnight, and the Editor-in-Chief of Heredity Prof. Barbara Mable. Tune in to h…
 
Within the Brazilian mangroves resides some of the most unique organisms on Earth: killifish. Specifically, two species within the genus Kryptolebias, which are the only known vertebrates to reproduce through self-fertilisation. What impact does this unusual mating system have on their population genetic structure? Dr Waldir Berbel-Filho ventured i…
 
Join Prof. Daniel Blumstein (UCLA) as he discusses his new popular science book The Nature of Fear: Survival Lessons from the Wild. Prof. Blumstein has scoured the animal kingdom in search of better ways for us to live wisely with this primordial emotion and cope with risk. It’s a journey that’s involved diving with giant clams, biking through tige…
 
The genetic structure of a population can shape an organism’s ecology and evolution. However, that structure often changes depending on the geographic scale you’re looking at. In this episode Dr Alex Twyford (University of Edinburgh) discusses the complicated genetic structures displayed by an emerging model – the yellow monkey flower, Mimulus gutt…
 
Museum collections play a vital role in active research and conservation programmes, and in this episode we’re going to explore a prime example of just how valuable they can be. Join Kyle Ewart (University of Sydney; Australian Museum Research Institute) and Leo Joseph (Australian National Wildlife Collection, CSIRO) as they discuss their recent re…
 
Motivated by a series of mass mortalities, a team of marine biologists voyaged across the Caribbean in search of a poorly understood organism – the vase sponge. Join Dr Sarah Griffiths (Manchester Metropolitan University) and Prof. Donald Behringer (University of Florida) as they discuss the complex population genetic structures they uncovered, and…
 
Speciation is often considered unidirectional: a continual process of divergence interrupted only by extinction events. However, this isn’t entirely true. In this episode Dr Jente Ottenburghs (Wageningen University) discusses the curious case of the bean geese: where speciation appears to have stopped and, perhaps, begun to reverse. See acast.com/p…
 
The antagonistic co-evolution that characterises host-parasite relationships is one of the most fascinating interactions in genetics. In this episode, Dr Gilberto Bento discusses one such interaction, the Daphnia–Pasteuria host–parasite system, and the discovery of an alternative route of bacterial infection associated with a novel resistance locus…
 
In episode five of our editorial series we meet Dr Rui Faria from the Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources at the University of Porto (Portugal). Dr Faria’s research looks at the role of chromosomal inversions in the generation of biological diversity, focusing on Littorina snails as a model. And, in a more personal inversion, Dr F…
 
The arms race between the highly toxic rough-skinned newts of North America and the garter snakes that prey upon them is a literal textbook example of evolution in action. However, it appears that a piece of the genetic puzzle underpinning this interaction has been overlooked, until now. In this episode, PhD candidate Kerry Gendreau (Virginia Tech)…
 
Chimpanzees are humanities closest cousins, and they’re close to disappearing. In this episode we hear from Peter Frandsen (Copenhagen Zoo, University of Copenhagen) and Claudia Fontsere (Barcelona Biomedical Research Park), who are developing new genetic tools to aid in the conservation of this iconic species. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and…
 
What impact does the initial size of a population have on an organism’s ability to adapt to its environment? In this episode we investigate this question with Dr Yashraj Chavhan and Prof. Sutirth Dey from the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) in Pune, India. Their results hold important insights for many aspects of populati…
 
The world is currently gripped by COVID-19, but could an often overlooked population genetic theory hold one of the keys to defeating it? In this episode we speak to Prof. Michael Lynch (Arizona State University) about a recent Comment he penned with Prof. Jeffrey Jensen, where they consider mutational meltdown as a potential SARS-CoV-2 treatment s…
 
French Polynesia is a South Pacific paradise, and thanks to an eccentric aviculturist it is also host to an interesting evolutionary experiment. In 1937, Eastham Guild released silvereye birds on Tahiti, from where they dispersed to other islands. Now they form the perfect system for testing the roles of drift and selection in rapid morphological d…
 
Poison dart frogs are an iconic group of tropical animals. But how and when did their spectacular warning colourations evolve? And are they really a signal to predators? In this episode we explore these questions with Diana Rojas and Adam Stow, as they discuss their recent forays into the depths of both Amazonia and modern molecular methods to unra…
 
In episode three of our editorial series we meet forest engineer turned plant geneticist Prof. Dario Grattapaglia. A highly experienced researcher and editor, Dario brings a unique and heavily applied focus to his work. His story and views on publishing are sure to inspire many! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Every winter population geneticists gather for the Population Genetics Group Meeting. This year, the 53rd meeting took place at the University of Leicester, and with the help of Michael Pointer, a PhD student at the University of East Anglia, we are going to bring you the highlights! From world-renowned researchers to rising stars, settle in and li…
 
In episode two of our editorial series, we meet Dr Marc Stift (University of Konstanz). A plant evolutionary geneticist with three years under his belt at Heredity, Marc has also authored five papers in the journal (so far). This gives him valuable perspectives from both sides of the process. What has he learnt? What tips can he give for writing a …
 
Charles Darwin described it as the most complex mating system in the natural world. Famed statistician Ronald Fisher was fascinated by it. And this episode’s interviewees braved 40 °C heat and caimans to unravel some of its mysteries. What is it? Tristyly — a rare and mysterious plant mating system. Tune in to hear what Dr Nicolay Cunha and Prof. S…
 
Behind the pages of Heredity there lies a group of incredibly dedicated, brilliant scientists—our editors! Who are they? What do they actually do? What kinds of research are they passionate about? What are they looking for in a good manuscript? These are the kinds of questions we are going to explore in a new series of episodes dedicated to these u…
 
In this episode we explore the nature vs. nurture debate in one of humanities closest companions – Dogs! Why do they do the things they do? Are their behaviours hardwired into their DNA? Tune in and listen to Dr Juliane Friedrich, Dr Pamela Wiener and Dr Marie Haskell as they discuss complex genetic behaviour traits in German shepherd dogs, collabo…
 
The annual Population Genetics Group Forum is an important, and much beloved, conference in the fields of genetics and evolution. As registration opens for the 53 meeting of PopGroup (to be held at the University of Leicester, 5th – 8th January 2020), we hear what's in-store from three of the people organising it: Dr Rob Hammond, Dr Richard Badge a…
 
Fish farming, or aquaculture, is an important source of animal protein, particularly in developing nations. Unfortunately, aquaculture is highly susceptible to outbreaks of infectious disease. In this episode, Lior David and Roni Tadmor-Levi (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) discuss their work trying to identify the genetic basis of disease surv…
 
An essential aspect of life is reproduction, and an essential aspect of reproduction is sex... except when it isn't. While common in invertebrates, asexual reproduction is only seen in around 90 vertebrate species. And in this episode, Dr Susana Freitas (University of Lausanne, Switzerland) explains her work looking at the hybrid origin of partheno…
 
Species are often thought of as discreet and separate from one another. However, hybrid zones often form between closely related species, providing the opportunity to test many evolutionary hypotheses. In this episode, we talk to Dr Henrique Batalha-Filho (Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brazil) and Dr Marcos Maldonado-Coelho (Lund University, Swede…
 
The Faroe Islands are a North Atlantic archipelago, famed for being a Viking stronghold. However, for the past few centuries the islands have themselves been besieged by one of the world's greatest invaders: the brown rat. In this episode, Dr Emily Puckett (University of Memphis) and Dr Eyðfinn Magnussen (University of the Faroe Islands) discuss th…
 
How do you breed a high-production cow fit for a changing world? It's rare that we discuss the impact of climate change on cattle agriculture, yet it's important to consider how rising temperatures will impact this important part of the global food chain. In today's episode, Prof. Ismo Strandén, Prof. Juha Kantanen and Prof. Michael Bruford discuss…
 
Collaboration is an essential aspect of modern science, and the authors featured in today's episode epitomise this relationship. In our most ambitions interview to date, all four first authors of a recent Heredity paper come together to discuss their work looking at range expansions in the blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus). Their resu…
 
Some like it hot. Some like it cold. But whatever an organism's preference, our changing climate is likely going to force them to adapt to new temperature regimes. This raises a particularly interesting question for those species with complex life-cycles: do different life stages respond to thermal pressures in a similar way? Or do they display dis…
 
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