show episodes
 
Old Rail Fence Corners is an historical treasure trove containing the stories of the first significant waves of European-American settlers in the now state of Minnesota (United States of America). This book has direct accounts of mid-19th century lives and experiences on the frontier, recounted by the frontiersmen and women when many of them were in their mid-90s. A group of volunteer women -- the Book Committee -- sought to record these recollections before they were lost with the passing o ...
 
History Slam is a conversational podcast that features discussions and debates around various historical topics or issues relevant to the understanding of history. Whether we talk with a historian about their new book or a musician about including historical references in their songs, History Slam focuses on the stories of the past, how those stories influence us today, and their role in shaping our shared culture. Within a relaxed environment we’re going to try and have some fun with histor ...
 
“He was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad!” The wonderful opening lines of this 1921 novel set the tone for the rest of this delightful story of an adventurer and romantic who dons several roles in his colorful life. Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini is an historical novel set in the turbulent times of the French Revolution. The plot describes Andre-Louis Moreau, a young lawyer adopted by his godfather who cannot reveal his parentage. Moreau inadvertently stumbles ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
By Sean Graham The connection between political identity and consumer habits has received plenty of attention in recent years. I’ve wondered how much the landmark 2010 Citizens United Supreme Court decision in the United States, which determined that limiting independent political spending from corporations and other groups violated the First Amend…
 
By Sean Graham In 1967, the federal government placed a moratorium on the death penalty in Canada. Nine years later, Bill C-64 officially abolished capital punishment. Over the previous century, 710 people were executed in Canada, but the public reaction to each of these varied. Some generated plenty of media attention, while others fell beyond the…
 
In this episode of the History Slam, Sean Graham talks with Carolyn Strange about her book The Death Penalty and Sex Murder in Canadian History. They discuss her background studying criminal justice, the public’s influence in capital cases, and the concept of discretionary justice. They also chat about the number of capital cases in Canada, how rel…
 
By Sean Graham In this episode of the History Slam, I talk with Jane Griffith about the book Words Have a Past: The English Language, Colonialism, and the Newspapers of Indian Boarding Schools. We talk about why schools published newspapers, who the intended audiences were, and the information they did not include. We also discuss the power of lang…
 
By Sean Graham Between 1928 and 1971, around 1 million immigrants arrived in Canada at Halifax’s Pier 21. In the years since its closure as a reception centre for immigration, the site has taken on a symbolic role in representing mid-century Canadian immigration, embodying the policies, procedures, and attitudes of the immigration system. The site …
 
By Sean Graham Last week at the National Archives in Washington, the President of the United States hosted what was billed as the White House Conference on American History, during which he said that, through his administration, the National Endowment for the Humanities had “awarded a grant to support the development of a pro-American curriculum th…
 
This week, Sean re-visits a conversation he had a couple years ago with Tonya Davidson, a sociologist for Carleton. They talked about why communities commission statues, how the public interact with them, and debate their value in encouraging historical thinking. They also walked through downtown Ottawa to look at some of the city’s monuments and t…
 
By Sean Graham Last month in Montreal, protesters toppled a statue of Sir John A. Macdonald. In response, Quebec Premier François Legault said that “We must fight racism, but destroying parts of our history is not the solution.” This refrain that removing statues is an effort to erase history is common from those who argue in favour of statues. Tha…
 
By Sean Graham On August 26, as the scheduled start time of the Milwaukee Bucks-Orlando Magic playoff game approached, word started to circulate that Bucks players would not be taking to the floor. Three days earlier in Kenosha, WI, about 40 miles from Milwaukee, Jacob Blake was shot 7 times in the back by police. In the hours that followed, all NB…
 
By Sean Graham New Denver is a small town in southeastern British Columbia. With its population of around 500 along the shores of Slocan Lake, the community attracts people looking to escape urban centres in search of nature. In addition to the campsites and trails listed among the village’s attractions, it is also home to Nikkei Internment Memoria…
 
By Sean Graham In this episode of the History Slam, I talk with Alana Maurushat about her new book Ethical Hacking. We talk about her background in cyber-security, the grey areas of hacking, and how protesters can protect themselves. We also discuss the ethics of hacking, how outcomes influence perceptions of hacking, and the resources companies pu…
 
By Sean Graham The years following the Second World War saw major changes to American society, from the rise of suburbs to powerful social movements to shifting international priorities. Within that change, popular culture took on a new significance in American life as television spread across the country and radio stations increasingly shifted to …
 
In this episode of the History Slam, Sean Graham talks with Katharine Bausch of Carleton University about her new book He Thinks He’s Down: White Appropriations of Black Masculinities in the Civil Rights Era. They talk about Norman Mailer and Jack Kerouac’s writing, Playboy‘s fashion pages, and blaxploitation films. They also discuss the historical…
 
In this episode of the History Slam, Sean Graham talks with Kyler Zeleny about his new book Crown Ditch & the Prairie Castle: Bedlam in the West. They talk about the changing face of the Prairies, the economic challenges facing small-scale farmers, and the role of agritourism. They also talk about the urban/rural political divide, the majesty of th…
 
In this episode of the History Slam, Sean Graham explores Ottawa on July 1. He talks with Aaron Boyes, Megan Reilly-Boyes, and Sarah E.K. Smith about Canada Day traditions before walking around the city to get a feel for a truly unique Canada Day. He visits Parliament Hill, Major Hill Park, the Rideau Canal, and the Museum of Nature and discuss wha…
 
In this episode of the History Slam, Sean Graham talks with Chad Reimer about his new book The Trials of Albert Stroebel: Love, Murder, and Justice at the End of the Frontier. They talk about John Marshall’s path to Sumas Prairie, Albert Stroebel’s life, and the other key people in the story. They also talk about murder investigations in the late 1…
 
In this episode of the History Slam, Sean Graham talks with Professor Janice Forsyth about her new book Reclaiming Tom Longboat: Indigenous Self-Determination in Canadian Sport. They talk about her experience as a winner of the award, the place of role models in sport, and the use of mainstream sports in colonization. They also talk about sport and…
 
In this episode of the History Slam, Sean Graham talks with Amanda Bittner of Memorial University about the significance of political leaders in federal politics. They talk about how polling data is used, partisan voting patterns, and the role of leaders in swaying voters. They also discuss policies v. personalities, the significance of branding le…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2020 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login