show episodes
 
Eliza Harvey is an Australian journalist who moved to Indonesia from Australia in 2015. Each week she phones her Mum -- ABC broadcaster Geraldine Doogue -- back home in Sydney. Both women are news junkies and mothers and avid Netflix fans. But Eliza is a Millennial and Geraldine's a baby boomer, which leads to a different take on life. Tune in for half an hour of laughs and conversation.
 
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show series
 
How will the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg influence the upcoming US election? Geraldine admired "RBG" - the incredibly intelligent jurist who went on to become a cult figure of the Left. Geraldine notes that Bader Ginsburg was lobbied to resign when Barak Obama was in power to make way for another progressive colleague. But RB…
 
A number of small towns in Poland have been campaigning against what they call 'homosexual ideology'. Local authorities in the provinces have passed resolutions against perceived threats such as sex education and gay rights. LGBT activists complain that they are stoking homophobia and effectively declaring ‘gay-free zones’. Both sides argue that th…
 
The Netherlands - small and overcrowded - is facing fundamental questions about how to use its land, following a historic court judgment forcing the state to take more urgent action to limit nitrogen emissions. Dutch nitrogen emissions - damaging the climate and biodiversity - are the highest in Europe per capita. And though traffic and building ar…
 
Eliza lived a relatively nomadic lifestyle in Australia before moving overseas. She moved from Sydney to Hobart as a cadet journalist and then onto Karratha – Perth – and then back to Sydney again. She travelled with the basics and never invested in much furniture because it was expensive to move. This week, she decided it was time to grow up and b…
 
Neurologist Dr Guy Leschziner explores the extraordinary sensory experiences of individuals with synaesthesia - a mash-up of senses where one sense automatically triggers another. Some synaesthetes hear colours, others feel sound.We meet James who perceives the world differently from most people, due to his brain’s unusual wiring. Whenever he hears…
 
Spain’s King Juan Carlos – a story of entitlement and dynasty… The emeritus king, Juan Carlos, has left Spain. But the man who propelled his nation from dictatorship to democracy is under intense public scrutiny. At the heart of allegations against the former king is a $100 million gift from the Saudi Royals. The Supreme Court in Madrid is investig…
 
In March and April, Guayaquil in Ecuador was the epicentre of the Covid pandemic in Latin America. The city’s health services began to collapse fast, so that the bodies of the dead were not collected from homes. Being at a loss to know what to do, desperate families deposited the remains of their loved ones in the streets. Eventually they were pick…
 
A failed coup in Venezuela - a story of hubris, incompetence, and treachery… At the beginning of May, the government of Nicolas Maduro announced the armed forces had repelled an attempted landing by exiled Venezuelans on the coast north of Caracas. Some were killed, others captured. This was Operation Gideon – an incursion involving a few dozen, po…
 
Eliza is ripping through "Rodham" which is the fictionalised version of Hillary Clinton's life if she didn't marry Bill. Eliza was initially put off my the premise of the book. Why dwell on alternative histories? It seemed like a waste of time. But she pushed on regardless and is now totally captivated. Meanwhile Geraldine is planning to watch the …
 
I sat down with Dr. Djayadi Hanan, the director of political science at Paramadina University and the executive director of LSI, to discuss how the pandemic might impact the controversial Omnibus Bill, the push by political parties to bring more power back to the central government and why has Governor Ridwan Kamil’s popularity increased as a resul…
 
What will the world look like post-Covid? In an age of increasingly inward focus can a spirit of multilateralism prevail to meet the challenges posed by the reconstruction of national economies as well as the needs of poorer countries and the international organisations? And does the post-Coronavirus moment provide an opportunity to think different…
 
How should governments respond to the pandemic? The Covid-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc both to health systems and economies. Above all it has served to expose inequalities both within nations and between them. Hardest hit are countries in the developing world, where government finances do not permit the level of support to citizens or the private …
 
Why did coronavirus strike so fast and so hard? There was plenty of warning that a pandemic was inevitable, but when a new virus emerged in a wet market in the Chinese city of Wuhan, the world proved powerless to prevent it spreading. The finger has been pointed in various directions: a failure by the Chinese authorities to communicate, a sluggish …
 
Geraldine's working too hard and she's trying to understand why. Partly it's because there's just so much to read at the moment. She's running to keep up. Eliza wonders if her Mum's work patterns are linked to Australia's emergence from the COVID-19 lockdown? But Geraldine thinks it's a result of "normal life" returning to the northern hemisphere. …
 
2020 is so challenging that Eliza is looking for advice from unconventional sources. This week, she rewatched the adventures of Olive & Mabel the labradors. In episode 3, the dogs emerge from a fetid pond and "let the unpleasantness sink in". It seems like a good mantra for life. Also this week, how should white people respond to the Black Lives Ma…
 
Retired General Jim Mattis has launched a scathing criticism of his old boss, labelling Donald Trump a divisive President and a threat to the Constitution. Geraldine and Eliza wonder if General Mattis' letter will act as a call to arms amongst Republicans who have been privately wary of the President's behaviour, but until now unwilling to criticis…
 
As we emerge from lockdown, are we facing a pandemic of anxiety? The COVID-19 crisis has forced us into new patterns of social interaction. We've been told that the best way to protect ourselves from coronavirus is staying indoors and away from people. Journalist and author Judith Hoare argues that social distancing feeds off fear. She conducted ex…
 
Geraldine and Eliza dive into the debate about Ronan Farrow's journalistic ethics this week. The New York Times has launched an attack on Farrow, arguing that he doesn't like to let inconvenient truths get in the way of a ripping yarn. The celebrity journalist won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on Harvey Weinstein along with New York Times jour…
 
The Central Government has prevented provincial leaders, such as Jakarta governor Anies Baswedan, from implementing a lockdown, despite the fact that Jakarta is the country’s epicentre for the Covid-19 virus. The president says that a lockdown would cripple the country’s economy and lead to social unrest. Does the government have the capacity to su…
 
Thousands of Bulgarian parents pulled their children out of school in a mass panic last October, fearing they would be abducted by social workers. Many more are protesting against a draft law they say puts 70 per cent of children at similar risk. Are they right to be scared? Or have rumours and fake news spread hysteria about the power of the state…
 
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