show episodes
 
Is capitalism the engine of destruction or the engine of prosperity? On this podcast we talk about the ways capitalism is—or more often isn’t—working in our world today. Hosted by Vanity Fair contributing editor, Bethany McLean and world renowned economics professor Luigi Zingales, we explain how capitalism can go wrong, and what we can do to fix it. Cover photo attributions: https://www.chicagobooth.edu/research/stigler/about/capitalisnt
 
Inequality Talks is a podcast from the Economic (In)Equality volunteer group at Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke, Aarhus. Through discussion, debate, and interview, each episode explores a different economic concept or policy idea, offering a brief overview for the uninitiated before diving into the complexities of what a given idea could mean, what it might look like in practice, and what all this economics talk has to do with inequality in the first place.
 
On Inequality Bites, we explore how we can make society more equal so that everyone can flourish. In each episode, Wanda Wyporska, Executive Director of The Equality Trust speaks to experts with learned and lived experience about the impact of socio-economic inequalities, and discusses solutions to overcome them.
 
Get an edge with the Hidden Forces podcast. Media entrepreneur and financial analyst Demetri Kofinas uses a financial and cultural lens to help you draw meaningful connections, challenge consensus narratives, and formulate solutions to complex problems—empowering you to make smarter decisions.
 
Solvable showcases the world’s most innovative thinkers and their proposed solutions to the world’s most daunting problems. The interviews, conducted by journalists like Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg, will launch a dialogue that both acknowledges the complexity of the issues while inspiring hope that the problems are, in fact, solvable.iHeartMedia is the exclusive podcast partner of Pushkin Industries.
 
Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
Between The Lines is a weekly syndicated half-hour radio newsmagazine featuring progressive perspectives on national and international political, economic and social issues. Since 1991, Between The Lines has provided in-depth, timely analysis on a wide range of political, economic and social issues including: the history and consequences of two U.S. wars with Iraq; increasing disparity in wealth in the U.S.; coverage of the global social justice movement and related protests challenging the ...
 
Coronavirus! Climate! Brexit! Trump! Politics has never been more unpredictable, more alarming or more interesting: Talking Politics is the podcast that tries to make sense of it all. Every week David Runciman and Helen Thompson talk to the most interesting people around about the ideas and events that shape our world: from history to economics, from philosophy to fiction. What does the future hold? Can democracy survive? How crazy will it get? This is the political conversation that matters ...
 
Will Covid-19 reshape the global economy or simply shrink it? What are nations doing to protect jobs and businesses from the fallout, and what will the long-term consequences be for labor markets, global supply chains and government finances? On Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders—the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management—we combine reports from Bloomberg journalists around the world and conve ...
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
"Ruthlessly truthful and highly insightful conversations on psychology, philosophy, politics, and academic culture." With Dr. Cory Clark (@ImHardcory) and Dr. Bo Winegard (@EPoe187), humans and assistant professors of social psychology. Guest appearances by Voltaire, dog and full professor of being adorable.
 
Thought-provoking videos about life and being human, with ideas from business leaders, psychologists and researchers speaking onstage at the TED conference, TEDx events and partner events around the world. You can also download these and many other videos free on TED.com, with an interactive English transcript and subtitles in up to 80 languages. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.
 
Interviews with top scholars in public health, sociology, childhood development and more - created during production of the acclaimed documentary UNNATURAL CAUSES: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? - are now available as edited podcasts. UNNATURAL CAUSES is a series about health, but it's not about doctors or drugs. Instead, the film crisscrosses the country to find stories and evidence of the underlying social conditions that shape who gets sick in the first place. Produced by California Newsre ...
 
This work presents Rousseau's belief in the profoundly transformational effects of the development of civilization on human nature, which Rousseau claims other political philosophers had failed to grasp. Specifically, before the onset of civilization, according to Rousseau, natural man lived a contented, solitary life, naturally good and happy. It is only with the onset of civilization, Rousseau claims, that humans become social beings, and, concomitant with their civilization, natural man b ...
 
Speak Out with Tim Wise is an informative and entertaining podcast aimed at promoting multiracial democracy and justice in dangerous times. The show features the biting, factual, and humorous commentary of its host, alongside dialogue with some of the nation's leading scholars, artists and activists, as well as grassroots community leaders whose voices are often ignored in the dominant media.
 
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show series
 
What is the story of race in American fiction? In Redlining Culture: A Data History of Racial Inequality and Postwar Fiction (Columbia University Press, 2020), Richard Jean So, an assistant professor of English in the Department of English at McGill University, uses computational and quantitative methods, alongside close textual analysis, to demons…
 
Police in Indianapolis have spent Friday looking for answers after a gunman shot eight people to death and then killed himself. The incident prompted President Biden to call the nation's gun violence incidents a "national embarrassment." The bloodshed stunned a city that's been hard hit by gun violence, and its mayor is calling for national action.…
 
Questions over the fatal shooting and the role of the police in the death of a teen are front and center in Chicago. There, the mayor, city officials and community leaders are taking stock of how police respond with force, and whether more changes are needed. Stephanie Sy speaks to Hans Menos, the Vice President of Law Enforcement Initiatives for t…
 
In our news wrap Friday, the U.S. Justice department rescinded a Trump-era curb on consent decrees, making it easier to investigate police departments and press for major changes in use of force. An Indiana man has become the first person to plead guilty to federal charges in the January assault on the U.S. Capitol. Russia responded to new U.S. san…
 
Friday saw the Biden administration giving mixed messages on refugee admission. After receiving blowback for keeping the historically low refugee cap set by President Trump, the White House quickly reversed its position, and said it will move to lift them. Yamiche Alcindor has more on the flip-flop, and discusses it with Jenny Yang, the vice presid…
 
It's been a record-breaking year of bills proposed in state legislatures that would limit transgender rights - from access to medical care to sports participation. Despite that, a new PBS NewsHour/NPR/Marist poll found that Americans across the political spectrum oppose those efforts, and more than half of people personally know someone who is tran…
 
New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including police shootings of people of color, and the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/fundersBy PBS NewsHour
 
In this special episode of Psyphilopod, Bo and original co-host Cory Clark are joined by the wonderful Diana Fleischman to discuss the ethics of our treatment of animals. First, they discuss utilitarianism, which is the basic moral framework through which Diana thinks about these issues. Then they get into the weeds of the morality of diets, asking…
 
Florida Passes Anti Riot Bill Granting Immunity To People Who Drive Through Rioters Amid BLM Riots. The bill is expected to be signed into law by Florida Governor Ron Desantis next week. Democrats and Leftist activists claim it will stifle free speech while conservatives are cheering on the legislation in hopes that it will finally put an end to th…
 
Patricia Lockwood's 2017 memoir Priestdaddy was named one of the 10 best books of the year by The New York Times Book Review. She's just released her debut novel No One Is Talking About This, which explores the perils of excessive exposure to the internet. Lockwood has also released two poetry collections and writes for The New York Times, The New …
 
Cal Flyn's latest book, Islands of Abandonment: Life in the Post-Human Landscape tells the story of a dozen abandoned places around the world, from Chernobyl to the volcanic Caribbean, and looks particularly at how nature reclaims and rebounds after humans leave. She explores the peculiar connection humans have to abandoned spaces, as well as the a…
 
The psychedelic drug psilocybin, found in magic mushrooms, is as good at reducing symptoms of depression as conventional treatment, a small, early-stage trial has suggested. The study, run by Imperial College London's Centre for Psychedelic Research, is among the first to test psilocybin against the usual drug treatment, an SSRI, in this case Escit…
 
Disturbing bodycam video released Thursday after public outcry over the Chicago police shooting of a 13-year-old boy shows the youth appearing to drop a handgun and begin raising his hands less than a second before an officer fires his gun and kills him. The footage of Adam Toledo’s killing comes during the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, a Minneapo…
 
In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Shruti Gohil, professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine’s School of Medicine. Topics today include: Spring Wave Of Coronavirus Crashes Across 38 States As Hospitalizatio…
 
The We Live Here team balances deep dives into systemic issues with inspiring stories about people working to make a difference in their own communities. So when a listener reached out and introduced us to the work of Jeffrey “JD” Dixon, an activist organizing cleanups and coalitions in East St. Louis, a predominantly Black city in Illinois, we kne…
 
Psychedelic drugs were a feature of 1960s counter-culture and the subject of serious medical research from the 1940s onwards. Research was halted after psychedelics were declared dangerous and banned but new research is finding them to be powerful medicine. And, with the coronavirus pandemic in full swing, why are there so few drugs to treat viruse…
 
What is the story of race in American fiction? In Redlining Culture: A Data History of Racial Inequality and Postwar Fiction (Columbia University Press, 2020), Richard Jean So, an assistant professor of English in the Department of English at McGill University, uses computational and quantitative methods, alongside close textual analysis, to demons…
 
The three decades that followed World War II were an exceptionally fertile period for American essays. The explosion of journals and magazines, the rise of public intellectuals, and breakthroughs in the arts inspired a flowering of literary culture. At the same time, the many problems that confronted mid-century America--racism, sexism, nuclear thr…
 
Coming up on Te Waonui - the Māori Party is in hotwater after failing to disclosing to the Electoral Commission large donation sums -- a Nurses' Union doesn't want non-clinical health workers to plug the shortage of Māori nurses and doctors for the covid vaccine roll-out --- and Māori academics say they're pulling double-shifts to provide unpaid cu…
 
The three decades that followed World War II were an exceptionally fertile period for American essays. The explosion of journals and magazines, the rise of public intellectuals, and breakthroughs in the arts inspired a flowering of literary culture. At the same time, the many problems that confronted mid-century America--racism, sexism, nuclear thr…
 
What is the story of race in American fiction? In Redlining Culture: A Data History of Racial Inequality and Postwar Fiction (Columbia University Press, 2020), Richard Jean So, an assistant professor of English in the Department of English at McGill University, uses computational and quantitative methods, alongside close textual analysis, to demons…
 
Y. Yvon Wang draws on previously untapped archives--ranging from police archives and surveys to ephemeral texts and pictures--to argue that pornography in China represents a unique configuration of power and desire that both reflects and shapes historical processes. On the one hand, since the late imperial period, pornography has democratized pleas…
 
The rapid gentrification of Black and brown neighborhoods in urban areas by predominantly upper-class white and other white-adjacent peoples is largely facilitated by urban redevelopment and revitalization projects. These projects often usher in aesthetics that seek to attract those understood as desirable populations. But what happens when the aes…
 
In this episode, I interview Michael Snediker, professor of English at the University of Houston, about his book, Contingent Figure: Chronic Pain and Queer Embodiment, recently published by University of Minnesota Press. At the intersection of queer theory and disability studies, Snediker locates something unexpected: chronic pain. Starting from th…
 
Our democracies repeatedly fail to safeguard the future. From pensions to pandemics, health and social care through to climate, biodiversity and emerging technologies, democracies have been unable to deliver robust policies for the long term. In Can Democracy Safeguard the Future? (Polity Press, 2021), Graham Smith, a leading scholar of democratic …
 
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