show episodes
 
[Un]Common Law is Bloomberg Industry Group's audio documentary podcast series reporting on a single topic over multiple episode series. Our initial series, Business of Bees, looked at commercial bee and insect pollination, an industry with an estimated economic value of about $217 billion. Coming soon: "Business, Interrupted," a special episode looking at the biggest legal battle of the pandemic, the fight between businesses and insurers. Produced and hosted by Adam Allington.
 
Sometimes all it takes is one little fact or one little piece of wisdom to change your life forever. That's the purpose and the hope of "Something You Should Know." In each episode, host Mike Carruthers interviews top experts in their field to bring you fascinating information and advice to help you save time and money, advance in your career, become wealthy, improve your relationships and help you simply get more out of life. In addition, Mike uncovers and shares short, engaging pieces of " ...
 
More than 154 million treasures fill the Smithsonian’s vaults. But where the public’s view ends, Sidedoor begins. With the help of biologists, artists, historians, archaeologists, zookeepers and astrophysicists, host Lizzie Peabody sneaks listeners through the Smithsonian’s side door, telling stories that can’t be heard anywhere else. Check out si.edu/sidedoor and follow @SidedoorPod for more info.
 
Food with a side of science and history. Every other week, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode exploring the hidden history and surprising science behind a different food- or farming-related topic, from aquaculture to ancient feasts, from cutlery to chile peppers, and from microbes to Malbec. We interview experts, visit labs, fields, and archaeological digs, and generally have lots of fun while discovering new ways to think about and understand the world t ...
 
BWI Companies Pest Podcast is designed to provide quality content for your business. This content includes tips and tricks for PCOs in the field, interviews with manufacturer reps, entomologists, marketing experts, EPA experts, and more. Whether in front of your computer or on the road, BWI has you covered with content that counts.
 
Ever wondered what happens when you fill a cello with bees? Or how robins have successfully colonised the outer-reaches of our universe? Or why the world is destined to be populated purely by female turtles? This podcast celebrates nature and the stories of those who care deeply for it. Join artist, actor and Woodland Trust ambassador David Oakes, for a series of informal, relaxed conversations with artists, scientists, creatives and environmentalists as they celebrate the beauty of the natu ...
 
Ellen Zachos and C.L. Fornari help you discover the amazing world of plants: in the garden, in the wild, and on your plate. They show you how to grow plants successfully, how to enjoy your natural surroundings, and how to make the most of your harvest, whether it's cultivated or foraged. (Spoiler alert: they don't always agree!) You'll find three different topics in each episode, plus email questions from listeners.
 
FANGORIA has teamed up with some of the leading horror genre experts to bring you COLORS OF THE DARK. Join hosts Dr. Rebekah McKendry (professor, Fangoria, writer-director) and Elric Kane (professor, Pure Cinema Podcast, filmmaker) as they take a deep look at the horror genre. Each show explores a specific part of horror history, key players, franchises, deep cut titles, important films, and interviews with some of the genres’ biggest icons. COLORS OF THE DARK PODCAST is presented by the FAN ...
 
Entocast is a podcast all about the fascinating world of insects. Join Nick and Liam as they discuss everything from Aphids to Ants, Bees to Butterflies... you get the idea! Every month they'll be a new episode about a new entomological topic.
 
This is more than a book about bees and their lives; the author talks about his cats, red ants, and insect psychology in general. Jean Henri Fabre also made waves in his native 19th Century France by insisting that girls be included in his science classes, so I dedicate this recording to certain young women who risk their lives or even the less important attentions of boys simply to learn. - Summary by BellonaTimes
 
Welcome to Blood City, a town overrun with infested creatures. Recently, Dr. Sarnaka of Teardrop Industries has created the perfect biological weapon, capable of taking over a host. Some are human, some are insect, some are bacterial. Anything can be infested. Before Blood cities were all over the country, they used to be normal. Our story begins in the Blood City that used to be Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
 
Submerged in a post-truth dystopia and suspecting he might already be dead, the invisible narrator of Notes from the Uncanny Valley floats with wry, dark humor through landscapes of crowded public transit and low-income housing. When a series of bizarre encounters with psychotic neighbors draw him into an absurd mystery lurking beneath the surface of daily life, he begins questioning everything, including the increasingly fantastic news headlines. As the world grows more alien by the moment, ...
 
Arthur Scott Bailey (1877 – 1949) was the author of more than forty children's books. "Mr. Bailey centered all his plots in the animal, bird and insect worlds, weaving natural history into the stories in a way that won educator's approval without arousing the suspicions of his young readers. He made it a habit to never 'write down' to children and frequently used words beyond the average juvenile vocabulary, believing that youngsters respond to the stimulus of the unfamiliar." (Wikipedia)
 
Welcome to the Cannabis Cultivation and Science podcast, I’m your host, Tad Hussey of KIS Organics. This is the podcast where we discuss the cutting edge of organic growing from a science based perspective and draw in top experts from around the industry to share their wisdom and knowledge. If you want to hear the latest in growing technology and methods, this is the place.
 
The heart of a man is darkness... No person, place or culture is immune to extreme violence. The worst of the worst cases have occurred all over the world. Be prepared to take a journey, a tour of the world, where the most horrible atrocities have occurred. Murder, rape, incest, dismemberment, & cannibalism... no terrifying detail will be unexplored. Based on actual events, this immersive audio experience will shock you, terrify you, and possibly make you ill. From the creators of Sword and ...
 
These 13 essays explore the fascinating world of insects all around us. Vernon Kellogg, an eminent entomologist and natural story teller, and his little friend Mary, start by collecting Tarantula Holes and proceed to observe spiders, ant lions, ants, wasps and many other tiny creatures in their daily life. Each creature has a wonderful story and it is told most entertainingly. (Summary by Phil Chenevert)
 
Loading …
show series
 
Virginia Emery is founder and CEO of Beta Hatch, a pioneering insect farming company that is industrializing insects for agriculture. Beta Hatch is fueled by a passion to see insects reach their true potential in our food systems. The company has grown to be internationally recognized for its scientific approach to scaling insect production and ope…
 
In Insect Artifice: Nature and Art in the Dutch Revolt (Princeton UP, 2019) Marissa Anne Bass explores the moment when the seismic forces of the Dutch Revolt wreaked havoc on the region’s creative and intellectual community, compelling its members to seek solace in intimate exchanges of art and knowledge. At the book’s center is a neglected treasur…
 
Image by: Numismática Pliego – Numismática Pliego, CC BY-SA 3.0 The name “Opium War” was first given to the war by a British newspaper opposed to the conflict. It was a derogatory label that implied the great British Empire, emancipator of slaves, was being lowered to doing the bidding of a bunch of British drug dealers selling opium mostly grown i…
 
Getting kids to eat their vegetables can be frustrating for parents. However there are some techniques that can help sway your kids to at least try to eat some vegetables. This episode begins with a couple of really easy ones. https://psychcentral.com/news/2020/02/21/when-both-parents-eat-veggies-kids-more-likely-to-follow-their-example/154381.html…
 
This year, dramatic wildfires wreaked havoc across the globe from Australia to Siberia. CrowdScience listener Melissa wants to know the extent to which climate change is a factor in blazes that appear to be increasing in both frequency and intensity.Presenter Anand Jagatia hears how scientists use alternative worlds in computer models, to understan…
 
The Restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660 changed the lives of English republicans for good. Despite the Declaration of Breda, where Charles II promised to forgive those who had acted against his father and the monarchy during the Civil War and Interregnum, opponents of the Stuart regime felt unsafe, and many were actively persecuted. Neverthe…
 
Andrea Pető's book The Women of the Arrow Cross Party: Invisible Hungarian Perpetrators in the Second World War (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) analyses the actions, background, connections and the eventual trials of Hungarian female perpetrators in the Second World War through the concept of invisibility. It examines why and how far-right women in gene…
 
A weekly news show produced with photos, videos and personal accounts from France 24 Observers around the world - all checked by our staff in Paris. This week: in Tunisia, protests over the suspension of a football team turned into a demonstration of the kind of desperation that drives so many Tunisians to try to cross the Mediterranean for a bette…
 
Discover spice rubs, a hot “Curio” houseplant, and hear what to do with the bulbs and other plants you haven’t yet placed into the ground. :30 What’s for dinner: Spice Rubs for Meat and Tofu 5:18 Insider Information: A suddenly “hot houseplant” - Curio rowleyanus, syn. Senecio rowleyanus 9:34 Eat/Drink/Grow: When you forgot to put bulbs or other pl…
 
We all want people to like us and obviously a lot of things determine just how likable you are. However, there are a few simple techniques to make you appear more likable instantly. I start this episode with three ways, according to Psychology Today, that will make you more likable to others when you meet them. And they aren’t what you probably thi…
 
Over the past two decades we’ve become increasingly sensitive to the overuse of plastic and more concerned about its environmental impact – but to what effect? According to the World Wildlife Fund, we’ve actually used more plastic since the year 2000 than in all the decades leading up to that date. And previous estimates for the amount of plastic i…
 
Stand-up comedian, adventurer, and science enthusiast Shane Mauss has been interviewing scientists each week since 2014. Originally from La Crosse, Wisconsin this former factory worker skipped college to become a comedian. His stand up has been on Comedy Central, Conan, Kimmel, Showtime, and Epix. In the age of podcasting, more people might be fami…
 
The figure of Sigmund Freud has captivated the Western imagination like few others. One hundred and twenty-five years after the publication of Studies on Hysteria, the good doctor from Vienna continues to stir controversy in institutions, academic circles, and nuclear households across the world. Perhaps Freud’s sharpest and most adamant critic, Fr…
 
While various systems theories have received rigorous treatments across the literature of the field, reliable and robust advice for systems practice can be somewhat harder to come by. Ray Ison has done much to remedy this state of affairs through his deeply theoretically grounded yet eminently practical book: Systems Practice: How to Act In Situati…
 
Most of our discussions about how “technology will change the world” focus on the global cities that drive the world economy. Even when we talk about China, we focus on its major cities: Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. Xiaowei Wang corrects this metronormativity in their recent book Blockchain Chicken Farm: And Other Stories of Tech in China's Coun…
 
Adam brings on author and academic psychologist Rob Brotherton to discuss why our brains are wired for conspiracy. They how classism and elitism shape our opinions about conspiracy theorists, how the word “fact,” and how humility is the key to meaningful conversations about truth.By Earwolf & Adam Conover
 
Brendan and Zach are joined by Taylor Cotter to talk about DON'T TELL MOM THE BABYSITTER'S DEAD (1991). They dive deep into the movie, discuss listener feedback and decide the connection for the next movie in the Ladder. The Ladder discussion begins at 1:15:10. So (re)watch the film (currently streaming on HBO), listen along to the discussion. Then…
 
Brittney Goodrich, a Specialist in Economics at UC Davis, breaks down the major factors influencing bee prices in this week’s episode. She also gives an update on the current economic outlook on almond pollination in 2021. Thank you to the Almond, Pistachio, Prune, and Walnut Boards of California for their kind donations. Thank you to Muriel Gordon…
 
Digitizing Enlightenment: Digital Humanities and the Transformation of 18th-Century Studies (Liverpool UP, 2020) explores how a set of inter-related digital projects are transforming our vision of the Enlightenment. The featured projects are some of the best known, well-funded and longest established research initiatives in the emerging area of ‘di…
 
“What are chromosomes? And what does it mean to treat them as visual objects?” asks Soraya de Chadarevian in her new book, Heredity Under the Microscope: Chromosomes and the Study of the Human Genome (University of Chicago Press, 2020). Considering this question as she follows the history of microscope-based practices in chromosomal research across…
 
In 1996 Argentina adopted genetically modified (GM) soybeans as a central part of its national development strategy. Today, Argentina is the third largest global grower and exporter of GM crops. Its soybeans—which have been modified to tolerate being sprayed with herbicides—now cover half of the country's arable land and represent a third of its to…
 
Protecting pollinators and improving the habitat for honey bees often entails planting nectar and pollen rich plants. In this episode, Kirsten talks with Calvin Ernst, founder of Ernst Seeds, who has been deeply involved with growing native plants for over 50 years. Learn how providing seeds for erosion control to the Department of Transportation h…
 
Common morality has been the touchstone of medical ethics since the publication of Beauchamp and Childress's Principles of Biomedical Ethics in 1979. Rosamond Rhodes challenges this dominant view by presenting an original and novel account of the ethics of medicine, one deeply rooted in the actual experience of medical professionals. She argues tha…
 
In 1930s Bucharest, some of the country's most brilliant young intellectuals converged to form the Criterion Association. Bound by friendship and the dream of a new, modern Romania, their members included historian Mircea Eliade, critic Petru Comarnescu, Jewish playwright Mihail Sebastian and a host of other philosophers and artists. Together, they…
 
The Icelandic mappae mundi were a series of maps produced in the late medieval period (c. 1225 - c. 1400) that bore witness to fundamental changes in the landscape of vernacular literary culture, scientific thinking and regional geopolitics. In The Mappae Mundi of Medieval Iceland (D.S. Brewer, 2020), Dale Kedwards explores the plethora of meanings…
 
The Icelandic mappae mundi were a series of maps produced in the late medieval period (c. 1225 - c. 1400) that bore witness to fundamental changes in the landscape of vernacular literary culture, scientific thinking and regional geopolitics. In The Mappae Mundi of Medieval Iceland (D.S. Brewer, 2020), Dale Kedwards explores the plethora of meanings…
 
Social and Conceptual Issues in Astrobiology (Oxford University Press, 2020) focuses on the emerging scientific discipline of astrobiology, exploring many of the humanistic issues this multidisciplinary field is generating. Despite there being myriad scientific questions that astrobiologists have only begun to address, this is not a purely scientif…
 
Will you be traveling over the holidays? Obviously, the spike in Covid-19 cases is causing people to reconsider travel and family get-togethers. Listen as this episode begins with the results of a survey about just how many people will or won’t be traveling over Thanksgiving and Christmas. Source: https://bit.ly/32SL0eB When you think about what’s …
 
It’s easy to forget that the “gig economy” was once universally referred to as the “sharing economy”. So what went wrong and is it possible to bring back that original promise of flexibility, autonomy and respect?Also, building a genuine cycling culture - the Dutch example. And how to make voice recognition technology better at understanding the vo…
 
How much water do you drink in a day? Not drinking enough water is a big problem. And while being a little dehydrated won’t kill you, dehydration does have a lot of significant and negative effects on your physical and mental wellness. This episode starts with a look at some surprising findings. http://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/5-signs-…
 
Every year, Western Afghanistan is hit with a fierce 120-day wind, and listener Hamid wants to know what causes this phenomenon? He’s from the city of Herat, where what starts as a gentle breeze in the morning can pick up to become a dangerous gale just a few hours later, devastating buildings and causing power outages. The BBC’s Abdullah Elham in …
 
If you have the pleasure of going out to eat anytime soon, you're advised to consult an exterminator who is IN THE KNOW about what's going on behind the counter, under the ovens and on the other side of the cupboards. Reason: Mouse feces, incorrectly applied pesticides and general inattention to proper sanitary conditions. They don't occur in every…
 
“Awareness of the EU's undeniable past and present importance can - and has - led to complacency and hubris. There is nothing inevitable about European integration". So writes Mark Gilbert in European Integration: A Political History (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020), a compact, narrative history of the European Communities and the European Union pitc…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2020 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login