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This podcast series features in-depth interviews with a wide range of corruption experts, on questions such as: What have we learned from 20+ years of (anti)corruption research? Why and how does power corrupt? Which theories help to make sense of corruption? What can we do to manage corruption? How to recovery stolen assets?
 
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Ipse Dixit

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Ipse Dixit

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Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. Each episode of Ipse Dixit features a different guest discussing their scholarship. The podcast also features several special series. "From the Archives" consists historical recordings potentially of interest to legal scholars and lawyers. "The Homicide Squad" consists of investigations of the true stories behind different murder ballads, as well as examples of how different musicians have interpreted the song over time. "The Day Antitrust Died?" ...
 
Filling the Gapp is a podcast about the important topics in South Africa that goes beyond the usual discussions of government simply in terms of corruption and incompetence. Of course, they are. But we aim to go deeper than that. What are the deeper underlying reasons informing South Africa's ruling ANC? How does the historical background of the ANC elders inform their strange decisions to ban the sources of sin tax, cigarettes and alcohol? How did the good intentions of anti-Apartheid activ ...
 
The premier Infectious Diseases remote learning resource on the web! Enjoy more than 200 hours of video presentations for medical students, residents, and other health professionals. Complete podcast series is at www.idpodcasts.net. Sponsored by the Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida, Douglas Holt, MD, Division Director. John T. Sinnott, MD, Past Director, Chairman, Department of Internal Medicine Also S ...
 
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In this episode, Logan Strother, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University, discusses his article, "An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Supreme Court Justices’ Public Rhetoric on Perceptions of Judicial Legitimacy," which he co-authored with Colin Glennon, as well as his other scholarship on judicial legitimacy. Strot…
 
In this episode, Thomas J. Tobin, an author, speaker, and scholar of higher education quality discusses his work on copyright education and distance learning. Among other things, he discusses how became interested in distance learning, how it lead to an interest in copyright policy and education, and the different ways in which he has advanced that…
 
This week we welcome Fernanda Odilla (@fe_odilla) and Anwesha Chakraborty (@anwesha8984) to talk about their research on how to use technology to assist bottom-up anti-corruption efforts. You can find more about their and Alice Mattoni’s work via https://site.unibo.it/bit-act/en/team/researchers What we cover in the podcast:Alice Mattoni’s BIT-ACT …
 
We welcome Kate Bateman, @katebatemandc), senior expert in the Afghanistan program of the United States Institute of Peace (https://www.usip.org/regions/asia/afghanistan), formerly in the Lessons Learned Program at Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (www.sigar.mil) Quarterly report by SIGAR: https://www.sigar.mil/quarterlyrepo…
 
We welcome Jodi Vittori, Professor of the Practice and Concentration Co-Chair for Global Politics and Security at Georgetown University and military veteran to the pod to talk about the role of corruption in Afghanistan. Warlord Inc. Report: https://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/pdf/HNT_Report.pdf Goldwater-Nichols Act: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldw…
 
In this episode, Benjamin P. Edwards, Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Public Policy Clinic at the University of Nevada Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law, discusses his draft article "Supreme Risk." Edwards explains that the United States financial markets are regulated primarily by self-regulatory organizations or "SROs" superv…
 
In this episode, Grace McLaughlin, a recent graduate of Harvard Law School, discusses her note "Fanciful Failures: Keeping Nonsense Marks off the Trademark Register," which is published in the Harvard Law Review. McLaughlin begins by explaining what "nonsense marks" are and why some companies register them. She observes that nonsense marks frustrat…
 
In this episode, Ashley T. Rubin, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, discusses her new book, "Rocking Qualitative Social Science: An Irreverent Guide to Rigorous Research," which is published by Stanford University Press. Rubin begins by explaining what qualitative research is, how it differs from quantitative r…
 
In this episode, Lee Montgomery, Associate Professor of Experimental Art and Technology at the University of New Mexico, discusses the intersection of artistic practice and the law. Among other things, he describes his Neighborhood Public Radio project, which was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial, and its reception by National Public Radio. He …
 
In this episode, Eric J. Segall, Ashe Family Chair Professor of Law at Georgia State University College of Law, discusses his forthcoming essay "John Roberts: Hubris-in-Chief." Segall reflects on the tension between Chief Justice Roberts's reputation as an institutionalist and the radical positions he has taken in many cases. He argues that this re…
 
In this episode, Zachary D. Kaufman, Associate Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of Houston Law Center, discusses his article "Digital Age Samaritans," which is published in the Boston College Law Review. Kaufman begins by describing "bad samaritan" laws that impose liability on certain people who fail to report crimes or oth…
 
In this episode, Anthony Moffa, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law, discusses his articles, "Word Limited: An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship Between the Length, Resiliency, and Impact of Federal Regulations" and "Strength In Numbers (of Words): Empirical Analysis of Preambles and Public Comments," both of wh…
 
In 1986, the American economist, political scientist and cognitive psychologist Herbert Simon published "Rationality in Psychology and Economics" in the Journal of Business. Continuing with Simon's critique of neoclassical assumptions of economic behavior, Simon asserts that the standard of rationality used in neoclassical economic analysis is insu…
 
In 1991, the American economist, political scientist and cognitive psychologist Herbert Simon published "Organizations and Markets" in the Journal of Economic Perspectives. It provides a critique of neoclassical and new institutional economic assumptions of organizational behavior. "Research into the decision-making process within economic organiza…
 
In this episode, Christine Abely, faculty fellow at New England Law Boston, discusses her article "E-Commerce Transactions and Country of Origin Marking for Imported Products: A Gap Between Statutory Purpose and Legal Requirements," which is published in the Virginia Journal of International Law. Abely describes the history of country of origin des…
 
In this episode, Joan Howarth, Distinguished Visiting Professor at University of Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law and Dean Emerita of Michigan State University College of Law, discusses her article "First and Last Chance: Looking for Lesbians in Fifties Bar Cases," which is published in the Souther California Review of Law and Women's Studie…
 
In this episode, Bernard Sharfman and Vincent Deluard discuss their article, "How Discretionary Decision-Making Has Created Performance and Legal Disclosure Issues for the S&P 500 Index." Bernard Sharfman is a Senior Corporate Governance Fellow at the RealClearFoundation, a member of the Journal of Corporation Law’s editorial advisory board, and a …
 
In this special episode of Kickback we air a roundtable discussion that took place at the 5th ICRN Forum (virtual; https://www.icrnetwork.org/what-we-do/conferences/icr-forum-virtual-2021/). For this event we welcome an exciting mix of researchers and practitioners to discuss how the two fields can learn from each other. This event was made possibl…
 
In this episode, Ross B. Nodurft, Senior Director of Cybersecurity Services at Venable LLP, Alexander Botting, Senior Director of International Cybersecurity Services at Venable LLP, and Amy Mahn, an international policy specialist in the United States Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Applied Cybersecurit…
 
In this episode, Etienne C. Toussaint, Associate Professor of Law at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, discusses his article "Blackness as Fighting Words," which is published in the Virginia Law Review Online. Toussaint begins by explaining how the First Amendment "fighting words" doctrine resonates with Blac…
 
In this episode, Evan Bernick, Executive Director of the Georgetown Center for the Constitution and Visiting Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, discusses his article "Eliminating Constitutional Law," which will be published in the South Dakota Law Review. Bernick begins by briefly describing the different ways legal theorists tal…
 
In this episode, David A. Friedman, Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives and Professor of Law at Willamette University College of Law, discusses his article "Do We Need a Bar Exam ... for Experienced Lawyers?," which will be published in the UC Irvine Law Review. Friedman begins by describing the controversy that erupted over the administration…
 
In this episode, Ryan Muldoon, Director of the Philosophy, Political Science and Economics Program and Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Buffalo, discusses his work on club goods and democracy. Muldoon begins by explaining how club goods are different from private and public good. He observes that club goods can both increase a…
 
In this episode, Rachel E. Lopez, Director of the Andy and Gwen Stern Community Lawyering Clinic and Associate Professor of Law at Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law, discusses her essay "Unentitled: The Power of Designation in the Legal Academy," which will be published in the Rutgers Law Review. Lopez explains why academic titles mat…
 
In this episode, Anya Bernstein, Professor of Law at SUNY Buffalo School of Law, and Glen Staszewski, Professor of Law and A.J. Thomas Faculty Scholar at Michigan State University College of Law, discuss their article "Judicial Populism," which will be published in the Minnesota Law Review. Bernstein and Staszewski begin by explaining what they mea…
 
In this episode, Cynthia Meyers, Professor of Communication at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, discusses her work on the history of radio blacklisting, including her book "A Word from Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising, and the Golden Age of Radio." Meyers explains how and why the blacklist worked, focusing on the incentives of sponsors, broadcast…
 
We welcome Alice Mattoni (@AliceEmme) to the podcast. Alice’s project webpage: https://site.unibo.it/bit-act/en AntiCorrp: https://anticorrp.eu/ Alice’s work with Donatella della Porta on social movements: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/9781118541555.wbiepc010 Fridays for future: https://fridaysforfuture.org/Black Lives Matter: ht…
 
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