show episodes
 
Career Foreign Service Officers interview America’s most influential diplomats, capturing the sacrifice, professionalism, humor, heroism, wisdom, and triumph of modern-day American diplomacy. Through personal anecdotes, guests explain what they were trying to achieve with a given foreign policy, how they tried to accomplish those objectives, and where things went right (or wrong). Featuring conversations with America’s greatest foreign policy minds, including Thomas Pickering, John Negropont ...
 
Welcome to the Global Cable, a brand new podcast at Perry World House at the University of Pennsylvania. In it, we discuss the world's most pressing challenges and the people who work on them! You should listen to this show if you: - Find foreign affairs and international politics interesting. - Want great career advice from experts. - Want to sound smart at your next dinner party.
 
The End Trafficking project is UNICEF USA's initiative to raise awareness about child trafficking and mobilize communities to take meaningful action to help protect children. In partnership with concerned individuals and groups, the End Trafficking project aims to bring us all closer to a day when there are no exploited children. By the end of each episode you will be informed of various child trafficking issues and have specific tools to take action. For more information, please contact end ...
 
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show series
 
While the Internet has given us a lot of good things, from comprehensive consumer choices to powerful movements to hold the powerful accountable, it also has its darker corners where hatred is thriving, where acts of terrible violence in the real world are inspired. As a Jewish writer who had often been targeted by anti-Semitic and misogynistic att…
 
This week we are pleased to welcome to the podcast Erica De Bruin, an Assistant Professor of Government at Hamilton College and the author of the new book, "How to Prevent Coups d'État: Counterbalancing and Regime Survival." At the time of this conversation with Robert Amsterdam, the Michigan Republican Party board of electors had refused to certif…
 
For the past 70 years, the United States has toyed with interventionism in the Middle East on numerous occasions, from Iran to Afghanistan (twice), Iraq, Egypt, Libya, and Syria, among others. And yet, despite the consistently disastrous consequences of these efforts, the same policies continue to attract support, as US decision-makers consistently…
 
Having gone through the tumultuous experience of this past election in the United States, with provocative propaganda, disinformation, fake news, and pervasive and extreme distrust, many feel like we're experiencing an unprecedented moment. But arguably, we've been here before. This week we are joined by Prof. Heidi Tworek, author of "News from Ger…
 
President-elect Joe Biden has won the 2020 US Presidential elections, but outgoing President Donald Trump is continuing with a show of defiance. Right from the heart of Philadelphia where the final votes are being counted, we are joined by constitutional and international law expert, Prof. William Burke White, who shares his view of what's been hap…
 
Up until his recent resignation due to health concerns, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe cast a long shadow as one of the most remarkable global statesman, shaping the country's alliances and leadership position in an extremely difficult and threatening region of the world. Journalist and author Tobias Harris, author of "The Iconoclast: Shinzo Ab…
 
On Wednesday, October 28, 2020 the Republic of Tanzania held presidential elections. Though many feared that it would be neither free nor fair, what came to pass was much worse than could have been imagined. Robert Amsterdam, the host of this podcast, acts as an international attorney for the main opposition candidate in this election, Tundu Lissu,…
 
From 1976-1983, a brutal military dictatorship disappeared some 30,000 citizens and arrested and tortured scores more in Argentina. As a young lawyer at the time known for representing dissidents and political prisoners, Juan Méndez himself was arrested and subjected to torture. The story of his career, rising to become the Special Rapporteur on To…
 
Korea is a deeply unique, complex, and interesting place in the world. Upended by repeated waves of war and occupation throughout its history, the modern nation has propulsively launched itself in the stratosphere culturally and economically and grown perhaps faster than any other. This presents undeniable benefits and prosperity, but also a number…
 
We often defer to superlatives when describing our current political age, but the truth is that in many respects, we have been here before. In the summer of 1901, the tycoon JP Morgan was assembling a merger that would give him a monopoly position over America's railroads. His strong supporter in the White House, President William McKinley, was the…
 
Ambassador Marc Grossman discusses his early years as a door-to-door salesman in Southern California, life as a Junior Officer in Islamabad, and his tumultuous year as an NEA staffer, during which the U.S. Embassy in Pakistan burned down, the U.S. Embassy in Libya was overrun, the Soviets invaded Afghanistan, and the Iran hostage crisis began. Amba…
 
For more than 20 years, Mike Masnick has been writing prolifically on the intersection of technology, freedom of speech, IP law, and politics at the award-winning blog Techdirt, helping to elevate awareness of how these crucial issues are impacting society. Joining the podcast with Robert Amsterdam today, Masnick discusses the recent drama around t…
 
Only a few years after the Arab Spring failed to convert Middle Eastern dictatorships into democracies (with the exception of Tunisia), many scholars and analysts stopped talking about it entirely, as if to pretend these events never took place. Harvard law professor and constitutional scholar Noah Feldman set out to change that with his latest boo…
 
This week we are pleased to be joined by Kurt Andersen, a polymath Peabody-award winning journalist, novelist, and radio host to talk about his latest book, "Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America." But before we get into the prerecord discussion of the book, we couldn't resist bringing Kurt back on the show for an update following one of the wilde…
 
Like no other president before him, Donald Trump and his inner circle have sought to monetize the White House - but has it been a good business? Dan Alexander, a journalist at Forbes and the author of the new book, "White House Inc.: How Donald Trump Turned the Presidency Into a Business," joins the podcast to discuss in detail the assets and reven…
 
FDR and Churchill. Kennedy and Macmillan. Reagan and Thatcher. Bush and Blair. Trump and Johnson. The so-called "special relationship" enjoyed between the United States and the United Kingdom in the past 75 years since the end of World War II, often guided by the personalities of the respective individual leaders, has come to define so much of what…
 
There are few other countries in history with Russia's record of foreign intrigue. High-level assassinations of prominent dissidents, including the nuclear poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko in London, Sergei Skripal in Salisburg, the most recent poisoning of Alexei Navalny presumably in Siberia followed by his recovery in Germany, have come to shap…
 
For many years now, China and Japan have not enjoyed very good relations. In fact, highly volatile and emotional issues of territory, history, and identity have escalated dangerously. But are these historical issues largely a political construction, and do in fact the two nations have more in common in terms of interests and history than they are a…
 
The deepening economic inequality being experienced in the United States has brought with it considerable cultural and political problems, the most interesting being the popularity of the Republican Party among lower income groups, despite a policy agenda that is decidedly hostile to their own economic interests. The answer, argue political scienti…
 
Over the past number of years, Washington has come to regard strategic competition with China through a rather narrow lens of trade, national security, and diplomacy, while paying much less attention to Beijing's ambitions to increase its influence across the Eurasian basin, from Pakistan to Kazakhstan and Iran. Daniel Markey, a professor at Johns …
 
We often discuss Russia's actions during the 2016 US election as though it were something "unprecedented." But in fact, there is a long established history of Russia, the Soviet Union before it, and the United States engaging in widespread efforts to interfere in elections around the world. The more important question is what to do about it. David …
 
With Labor Day behind us and the weather cooling down, summer is very nearly over - but there's still time for one more episode of our special Summer Reading List podcast series. Our last episode features Barbara Elias, an Assistant Professor of Government at Bowdoin College specializing in international relations, insurgency warfare, U.S. foreign …
 
The proliferation of nuclear weapons during the Cold War in a way served as a deterrent for conflict between nations - the power of these weapons was so overwhelming and the potential consequences of any action so irreversible, it was possible to sustain a long period of détente. But as technology evolved, and micro-aggressions of state-sponsored h…
 
Following the demise of the Nazi regime in Germany at the end of the second World War, European nations set about a series of reforms to their political systems which would continue to entail popular representation expressed through a stronger set of institutions, bureaucracy, and law to constrain the potential abuses which sparked the war. Oxford …
 
In the 1950s and 1960s, the United States engaged in a relentless anticommunism crusade which included the sponsorship of mass killings, coups, and installations of authoritarian regimes across much of the global South, from Indonesia to Brazil. In his fascinating new book, "The Jakarta Method: Washington's Anticommunist Crusade and the Mass Murder…
 
In 1942, Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle led an audacious one-way bombing raid to hit targets in Japan which many thought impossible. With nowhere to land their planes, eight American airmen who were captured afterward by Japanese troops in occupied Chinese territory, and later subjected to trials and death sentences. In his fascinating new book, "Last…
 
The new semester might be getting started, but the weather still feels like summer here in Philadelphia, and we hope you find time to enjoy a few more books on your summer reading list before the fall truly sets in. Our latest guest on our Summer Reading List podcast is Ambassador Capricia Marshall, who served as Chief of Protocol of the United Sta…
 
Tundu Lissu is not known for backing down from a challenge. From his humble roots growing up herding cattle in Central Tanzania to his British education and legal practice, he rose to a senior position in the CHADEMA opposition party. As a vocal critic challenging the alleged human rights abuses of President John Magufuli, in 2017 he survived an at…
 
Ambassador Stephen D. Mull discusses life as a Junior Officer in The Bahamas, reporting tours in apartheid South Africa and communist Poland, and life on seventh floor. Ambassador Mull also discusses his first DCM tour in post-9/11 Jakarta, the importance of public diplomacy, and implementing the Iran deal. Interview excerpted from the forthcoming …
 
As the Syrian conflict has raged on for almost a decade, and the United Nations is hamstrung with Russia's veto power over proposed legal instruments to intervene, international law finds itself being innovated at light speed in response. Michael Scharf, the co-dean of the Law School of Case Western Reserve University and the co-author of "The Syri…
 
As the trade war heats up between the United States and China, the strategic calculations on behalf of both Donald Trump and Xi Jinping bear increasing levels of risk of the confrontation spinning out of control. Joining the podcast this episode are two Wall Street Journal reporters, Bob Davis and Lingling Wei, whose new book "Superpower Showdown: …
 
As a career foreign service officer, Elizabeth Shackelford was seen as a rising star in the US State Department, a recipient of the Barbara Watson Award for Consular Excellence. But in 2017 she resigned from public service, publishing a stinging indictment of a letter which brought to light the extraordinary mismanagement and strategic drift under …
 
Our guest this week is Eric Cervini, an award-winning historian of LGBTQ+ politics and culture. A former Gates Scholar at the University of Cambridge, where he received his Ph.D., he is an authority on 1960s gay activism. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Harvard Gender and Sexuality Caucus, and on the Board of Advisors of the Mattachine S…
 
With assassinations taking place on foreign soil, widespread hacking and disinformation campaigns aimed at undermining democratic elections, and provocations of armed conflict across multiple theaters, Russia's role in the post-Cold War international system under President Vladimir Putin has been that of a disrupter. But they've likely never had a …
 
As an attorney, distinguished diplomat, academic and author, there are few public officials with careers as varied and impressive as Philip Zelikow. He served as the executive director of the 9/11 Commission, was the author of the "Zelikow memo" disputing the legal grounds of torture of terrorism detainees, and co-authored books with former Secreta…
 
The United States has enjoyed a position of relative primacy in the international system since the end of World War II, but are those days numbered as China and other powers continue to rise? Or does Washington still have a few more decades left in the tank? Matthew Kroenig, a political scientist and the Deputy Director of the Atlantic Council's Sc…
 
Our latest guest on the Summer Reading List is Daniel Markey, a senior research professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and the academic director of SAIS’s Global Policy Program. From 2003 to 2007, Markey held the South Asia portfolio on the Secretary’s Policy Planning Staff at the US Department of St…
 
For fans of legal fiction, there are few characters more memorable than Scott Turow's protagonist, Alejandro “Sandy” Stern, whose crusading work as a defense counsel first appeared in his 1987 book, "Presumed Innocent." Now, with Turow's latest novel, "The Last Trial," it appears we are witnessing the end of a long arc of a beloved character. In th…
 
The United States has risen to its position of primacy thanks to a carefully constructed system of alliances with numerous other countries. That system, however, has suffered significant damage in recent years, is under increasing attack both at home and abroad, and desperately needs rebuilding, argues Mira Rapp-Hooper, a Senior Fellow at the Counc…
 
Last month, the White House issued an executive order to apply terrorism-style sanctions such as bank account and asset seizure orders against members of the International Criminal Court (ICC), presumably as a response to express disapproval of a war crimes investigation related to events in Afghanistan. William Burke-White, a law professor at the …
 
Ambassador Thomas A. Shannon, Jr. discusses the importance of history and strategic thinking in the practice of diplomacy, and the social, economic and political forces likely to shape the future. Ambassador Shannon also discusses his multiple White House tours, his service as Under Secretary (and Secretary) of State, and what it means to serve as …
 
For 175 years, well before the young Mao Zedong began his Long March, two rival Jewish dynasties dominated Chinese business and politics, accumulating massive wealth and power while navigating the tumultuous history of the period before losing nearly everything once the Communists swept into power. Jonathan Kaufman, a Pulitzer-prize winning journal…
 
This summer, we've launched a special edition of The Global Cable - our 'Summer Reading List.' Every other week, we'll release a new conversation with an author, discussing their latest book and the inspiration behind it. This week's guest is Melissa Lee, Assistant Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and our next…
 
For many years, Africa's natural resource wealth, young population, and vibrant societies have raised many hopes for a rapid emergence on the world's stage - but the development of these opportunities has often slow and uneven. So what is holding the region back? John Campbell, a former US Ambassador to Nigeria, Senior Fellow at the Council on Fore…
 
So much of the peace and prosperity achieved following the end of World War II and past the end of the Cold War was rooted in a common civilizational grammar driving foreign policy, an imagined community of nations referred to as "The West" based on a set of Enlightenment ideas. But then we lost confidence in that cultural narrative, and gradually …
 
There are few other countries in the world that have wielded money and influence as well as the modern Russian state, to the point of purchasing impunity and acquiescence to their status quo. And this is not all simply because of a "master strategy" by Vladimir Putin, but instead a vast and complex system of illicit enrichment and state capture by …
 
This summer, we're launching a special edition of The Global Cable - our 'Summer Reading List.' Every other week, we'll release a new conversation with a writer, discussing their latest book. We want to hear what inspired them, what they learned during the writing process, and more. Our first guest is renowned journalist and author James Mann, talk…
 
Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield discusses growing up in the segregated south, succeeding as a tandem couple, and raising kids in the Foreign Service. Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield also discusses her tenure as U.S. Ambassador to Liberia, promoting gender and ethnic diversity at the State Department, and the killing of George Floyd. Interview excer…
 
For experts who spend their careers studying modern authoritarianism, it has only recently become prudent to apply their analytical skillset to talking about political developments in the United States. Journalist and author Sarah Kendzior, who stood out in 2015 as one of the lone voices warning that Donald Trump was going to win the presidency, sp…
 
Earlier this month marked the 31st anniversary of Tiannanmen Square, while during this same period, the same Chinese Communist Party solidified its grip on Hong Kong with the passage of a new national security law that would subject Hong Kongers to extradition and Chinese legal jurisdiction. These events are just examples of the extreme lengths Bei…
 
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