show episodes
 
The classic Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice, with an awesome cast playing all the characters and gorgeous ambient sounds to bring the story to life. This dramatised audiobook is produced by the Australian community theatre company, Ballarat National Theatre. Take your love of the podcast home with you and support us by buying some merchandise on our RedBubble store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/BalNatTheatre/shop
 
Classic lit with a modern tone, every other week. From the creators of Myths and Legends, comes an altogether same-but-different podcast set in the world of classic lit. These are the stories of Dracula, The Time Machine, The Three Musketeers. They're stories written by Jane Austen, Shakespeare, and H.P. Lovecraft, but with a casual, modern tone. Listen as Jason and Carissa Weiser breathe new life into the classics and tell the stories of some of the greatest books ever written.
 
It is a truth universally acknowledged that two women obsessed with Jane Austen will inevitably start a podcast about it. Join Annie and Jessie - two women of the modern era, general book lovers and internet nerds - as they dive into the books, the adaptations and all the other inspired works of the woman whose brand remains strong to this day. From Sense & Sensibility to Clueless, we're tackling them all!
 
Sips & Sensibility is a Jane Austen adaptation podcast hosted by longtime best friends Beth, Julia, and Lori. Join us every other week for a new adaptation breakdown and review filled with insightful thoughts, wacky antics, and, of course, Jane Austen. If you love to chat with friends over a good beverage, you’ll love this podcast. Strap in, grab a drink, and join us as we dive in each episode. Who knows maybe you will find a new favorite adaptation along the way. Oh and Mr. Darcy? Call me! ...
 
Mansfield Park features Austen’s frailest and perhaps most scrupulous heroine, Fannie Price. As the eldest daughter in a poor family, Fannie is sent to rich relatives when she’s just old enough to fully appreciate the shame of her circumstances. Without pride or prejudice, Fanny sticks to principles in all matters. And matters certainly put her to the test. (Summary by Anita)
 
Anne Elliott, Jane Austen's only aging heroine, has devoted her life to caring for her financially irresponsible family. Just when she is growing content with her uneventful lifestyle, a long-lost flame re-enters the picture -- now as the beau of her significantly younger cousin. Anne is now faced with a choice: will she watch Captain Wentworth settle into life with another woman, or will she strive to win back his love and escape her family? (Summary by Kirsten Ferreri)
 
Persuasion is a regency Cinderella-esque tale of a young woman, the beautiful Anne Elliot, who is persuaded from marrying the Naval officer of her heart. It is now almost nine years since she rejected him. Bonaparte has abdicated and England's sailors return home covered in glory. Fredrick Wentworth is now a rich and highly eligible sea captain and the two are curiously thrown together. Will their forgotten affection blossom anew? Or has the captain found another? (Summary by rlowalrus)
 
This recording includes a selection of Jane Austen's letters, edited by Susan Coolidge and chosen from the collection of Austen's great-nephew, Edward, Lord Brabourne. The letters are mostly addressed to Austen's sister Cassandra, with whom she was very close. There are also some letters written to two of her nieces, Anna Austen Lefroy and Fanny Knight. They include some references to her published work, including Sense and Sensibility (abbreviated "S and S"), Pride and Prejudice (also calle ...
 
Before becoming the author of such classics as Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma, Jane Austen experimented with various writing styles as a teenager in the early 1790s. This is a collection of her juvenilia, including the epistolary novels Love and Freindship, Lesley Castle, and Lady Susan, as well as her comic History of England and some shorter pieces. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett)
 
A comedy of manners, Emma portrays the spoilt, snobbish, yet charming Emma Woodhouse as she delightfully interferes in the relationships of others without taking much notice of her own heart. Although quick to make prejudgments and decisions, Emma is eventually able to notice her mistakes, and it is this revelation that makes her an endearing heroine and an inspiration to women throughout. Austen has not only created, but also brought to life the world inhabited by her characters through her ...
 
Eight years ago, Anne Elliot fell in love with a poor but ambitious young naval officer, Frederick Wentworth. The Elliots were dissatisfied with Anne's choice, feeling he was not distinguished enough for their family, and her older friend and mentor, Lady Russell, acting in place of Anne's deceased mother, persuaded her to break off the match. Now 27 and considered a spinster, Anne re-encounters her former fiance, now a captain, as he courts her spirited young neighbour, Louisa Musgrove. The ...
 
Emma, by Jane Austen, is a novel about youthful hubris and the perils of misconstrued romance. As in her other novels, Austen explores the concerns and difficulties of genteel women living in Georgian-Regency England; she also creates a lively comedy of manners.Before she began the novel, Austen wrote, "I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like." In the very first sentence she introduces the title character as "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich." Emma, howev ...
 
Emma, by Jane Austen, is a novel about youthful hubris and the perils of misconstrued romance. As in her other novels, Austen explores the concerns and difficulties of genteel women living in Georgian-Regency England; she also creates a lively comedy of manners among her characters.Before she began the novel, Austen wrote, "I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like." In the very first sentence she introduces the title character as "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, a ...
 
Jane Austen famously described Emma Woodhouse, the title character of her 1815 novel, as "a heroine whom no-one but myself will much like." Yet generations of readers have loved Emma, as much for her blunders as for her wit and vivacity. Emma, "handsome, clever, and rich," has nothing else to do but try to pair off her friends, and she consistently mis-reads the relationships and situations around her as much as she mis-reads her own heart. The novel features a wonderful cast of characters, ...
 
EconTalk is an award-winning weekly podcast hosted by Russ Roberts of Stanford University's Hoover Institution. The eclectic guest list includes authors, doctors, psychologists, historians, philosophers, economists, and more. Learn how the health care system really works, the serenity that comes from humility, the challenge of interpreting data, how potato chips are made, what it's like to run an upscale Manhattan restaurant, what caused the 2008 financial crisis, the nature of consciousness ...
 
Pride and Prejudice is the most famous of Jane Austen’s novels, and its opening is one of the most famous lines in English literature - “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”� Its manuscript was first written between 1796 and 1797, and was initially called First Impressions, but was never published under that title. Following revisions it was published on 28 January 1813 by the same Mr. Egerton of the Military L ...
 
Pride and Prejudice is the most famous of Jane Austen’s novels, and its opening is one of the most famous lines in English literature - “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” Its manuscript was first written between 1796 and 1797, and was initially called First Impressions, but was never published under that title. Following revisions it was published on 28 January 1813 by the same Mr. Egerton of the Military Li ...
 
Forget the latest bestsellers or Booker Prize winners! Our book club gets stuck into the true classics of the literary world - footballers' autobiographies. Every week, our book club of comedy writers shun classic prose for ex-pros by reading another obscure footballer's autobiography. Perfect for those who like their reading a little less Jane Austen, a little more Charlie Austin. As recommended by The Athletic, BBC Five Live and The Sunday Post. Named one of Esquire's best podcasts of 2020 ...
 
The podcast most capable of ruining bookstores for you forever. TV's Kevin Lanigan, Vern Tooley, Joe Konroy, & Justin Germeroth are veteran improvisers, taking their singular gifts for bringing silly characters to life directly to you. What if all the great writers you learned about in school were alive and well? What if they were unstable morons? What if Jane Austen swung from the chandelier on weekends and Mark Twain was a weird racist? These are the kinds of questions we answer here. You ...
 
Love and Freindship [sic] is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790, when Austen was 14 years old. Love and Freindship (the misspelling is one of many in the story) is clearly a parody of romantic novels Austen read as a child. This is clear even from the subtitle, "Deceived in Freindship and Betrayed in Love," which neatly undercuts the title.Written in epistolary form, it resembles a fairy tale as much as anything else, featuring wild coincidences and turns of fortune, but Austen is d ...
 
The tale centers around Anne Elliot and Captain Wentworth and their reunion after years of separation; Anne rejected the Captain's proposal in order to satisfy familial and social duties. Years without Wentworth have been a regret for Anne who is a person of no consequence to her family. However, circumstances will soon bring the Captain back into her life. Will bitterness part them forever, or do old feelings die hard?This audiobook is part of the Audio Literature Odyssey Podcast. Please vi ...
 
A cautionary tale about the evils of interference, matchmaking and good intentions turned awry, Emma is the study of a young woman raised without sufficient discipline or occupation. Handsome, clever and rich, Emma is the epitome of what a young woman should be in Regency England, except for the fact that her indulgent father and lack of a mother have left her spoiled and used to getting her own way. Emma's only true critic and voice of reason is Mr. Knightley, a gentleman whose opinion she ...
 
Emma is a novel about youthful hubris and the perils of misconstrued romance....As in her other novels, Austen explores the concerns and difficulties of genteel women living in Georgian-Regency England; she also creates a lively comedy of manners among her characters. Before she began the novel, Austen wrote, "I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like." In the very first sentence she introduces the title character as "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich." Emma ...
 
If it is a truth universally acknowledged that a good-looking girl cannot fail of attracting a clever young man does it follow that the reverse is also true? If the man comes of a terrifyingly dysfunctional family and the girl in question likes to see spooks and horrors round every corner, yes. Morland by name, Lackland by nature, Catherine, not altogether addicted to the heroine role in general, finds this greatness thrust upon her in the (fortunately, principally financial) fantasies of he ...
 
Miss Frances, the youngest Ward sister, "married, in the common phrase, to disoblige her family, and by fixing on a lieutenant of marines, without education, fortune, or connexions, did it very thoroughly. She could hardly have made a more untoward choice." Some years later, pregnant with her ninth child, Mrs. Price appeals to her family, namely to her eldest sister and her husband, Sir Thomas Bertram, for help with her over-large family. Sir Thomas provides assistance in helping his nephews ...
 
An epistolary novel, Lady Susan is an early work by Austen that was posthumously published in 1871. The short novel focuses on the self-serving eponymous anti-heroine, as she cunningly maneuvers her way through society in search of a wealthy husband for both her daughter and herself. Disregarding anything but her own selfish goals, Susan employs her charms to lure men and draw them into her web of deceit, no matter their age or status. Exploring issues including morals, manners, self-indulge ...
 
In celebration of MASTERPIECE's airing of Sense and Sensibility, New York Times #1 bestselling author of Take Time for Your Life and life coach Cheryl Richardson looks at how modern-day challenges can be addressed with the wisdom of Jane Austen. In a two-part audio podcast, one related to each part of MASTERPIECE's Sense and Sensibility, Richardson gives a 21st century inspiring twist to a classic.
 
Mansfield Park is Jane Austen's 1814 novel focusing on Fanny Price, the daughter of a poor Portsmouth family, who is taken to live with her aunt and uncle Bertram's family on their estate at the age of ten. Surrounded by her wealthy and privileged cousins, and continually reminded of her lower status by her bullying Aunt Norris, Fanny grows up timid and shy, but with a strong sense of ethics, partly instilled by her kindly cousin Edmund. Fanny's gratitude and friendship for Edmund gradually ...
 
Northanger Abbey follows Catherine Morland and family friends Mr. and Mrs. Allen as they visit Bath, England. Seventeen year-old Catherine spends her time visiting newly-made friends, such as Isabella Thorpe, and going to balls. Catherine finds herself pursued by Isabella's brother John Thorpe (Catherine's brother James's friend from university), and by Henry Tilney. She also becomes friends with Eleanor Tilney, Henry's younger sister. Henry captivates her with his view on novels and his kno ...
 
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show series
 
Elizabeth receives an unexpected and late letter from home with some dramatic family news which she fears could greatly impact her rekindled relationship with Mr Darcy. Love the podcast? Support us by purchasing some of our awesome merchandise on our RedBubble store. This episode features the voices of Olivia French as Elizabeth Bennet, Liana Skewe…
 
Hey y'all, Are the shades of our podcast to be thus polluted? We reach the end of PPBBCAEnemesis, as it is properly known, and get in a few last dunks on poor Lydia. But never fear, this is not the end of our miniseries chat—two more episodes, and then we move on to the Laurence Olivier/Greer Garson film adaptation. Have a SAFE, EXTREMELY SAFE holi…
 
This week we're heading back to Scotland to read Rangers legend Barry Ferguson's 2006 autobiography 'Blue: The Life and Times of Barry Ferguson'. Features Barry trying to win back the Rangers fans after his controversial move to Blackburn, getting into tussles with his best mate the gardener and Graeme Souness sleeping standing up. Plus Barry gives…
 
This week, we’re talking about rare books, forgeries, and biblio curiosities with Patrick Olson, proprietor of Olson Rare Books. We also discuss Phillis Wheatley’s legacy and the new book of poetry by Honoree´ Fanonne Jeffers entitled The Age of Phillis. Find Pat online at www.olsonrarebooks.comBy Bonnets At Dawn
 
Brian, Erica, and Mark reflect on this weird sci-fi HBO Max series by Aaron Guzikowski and Ridley Scott. How much are we supposed to understand? Can we identify with any of the android and/or wild child and/or murdering characters? Is the imagery too heavy handed? How does it compare with Westworld, The Walking Dead, etc.? Warning: Spoilers ahoy! S…
 
Author and journalist Virginia Postrel talks about her book The Fabric of Civilization and How Textiles Made the World with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Postrel tells the fascinating story behind the clothes we wear and everything that goes into producing them throughout history. The history of textiles, Postrel argues, is a good way of understandin…
 
This week The Football Book Club invite author, filmmaker and Vice legend Oobah Butler to join the book club. And at his request, they're reading Southampton God Matt Le Tissier's 2009 book 'Taking Le Tiss'. Contains Matt single-handedly saving Southampton year after year, Ronan Keating's Charity Golf Tournament and Matt on a night out at a Shania …
 
Mark, Wes, Dylan, Seth get into specific points and textual passages from Peter Kropotkin's The Conquest of Bread (1892). In this preview, we start by considering that Kropotkin is right that mutual aid is a natural tendency and so communism is very much feasible, why hasn't it happened already? In the full discussion, we discuss K's version of the…
 
Hey y'all, Please read this, if you have a minute. Our next episode was meant to be our take on the fifth A&E/BBC PP as adapted by Emma Thompson's nemesis. As you'll hear, things had to shift a bit. Don't worry! That's coming this week! But for now, here's our 100th episode. We recorded this Friday night the week of the election, and as you may rec…
 
What happens when kids do the opposite of what they're told? Celebrate the launch of our new podcast, Ooh You’re In Trouble with 2 stories of kids breaking the rules. Featuring the diary of a girl determined to stay on the right side of the law. Plus, a sneak peek of our new podcast with a story of a kid who commits a delicious crime. Learn more ab…
 
What do we mean when we talk about the American Dream? Is it realistic? Wes & Erin discuss F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby.” The post (sub)Text: The American Dream in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby" first appeared on The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast.By Wes Alwan
 
Mark, Erica, Brian, and musician/actor Aaron consider the comedy of Sacha Baron Cohen, especially Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, where his co-stars are unwitting dupes and embarrassment is served in large helpings. We talk through the ethical and political issues, why Cohen's targets act how they do, and what this is as humor. For more, visit prettymu…
 
On Peter Kropotkin's The Conquest of Bread (1892). If we want an egalitarian society, do we need the state to accomplish this? Kropotkin says no, that in fact the state inevitably serves the interests of the few, and that if we got rid of it, our natural tendencies to cooperate would allow us through voluntary organizations to keep everyone not onl…
 
Author and economist Steven Levitt is the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and host of the podcast "People I (Mostly) Admire." He is best known as the co-author, with Stephen Dubner, of Freakonomics. The book, published in 2005, became a phenomenon, selling more than 5 million copies in 40 l…
 
What, you thought we were done with Pride and Prejudice?! Well, buckle up, gentle listeners, because we’ve got a lot of episode for you! Jessie and Annie tackle as many adaptations of as they possible can, and they don’t do it alone! Special guest and BFF4EVA Liz joins the two as they talk casting, favorite Darcys (all of them) and other things the…
 
Everyone's banging on about America at the moment, so this week The Football Book Club decided it's the perfect time to read 'Breakaway' by USA and now Tottenham Hotspur Women superstar Alex Morgan! Features Alex winning basically every trophy in the world, Hope Solo doing the worm and exceptional tips on how to park your car. Plus Ken's back with …
 
(Note: This episode was recorded on November 1st 2020, so there is no discussion of the US presidential election or its outcome.) Join us, gentle listeners, for our movie review of the effervescent Bollywood P&P adaptation Bride and Prejudice, directed by Gurinder Chadha. This movie ports Austen's classic tale to modern-day India for an east-meets-…
 
Lizzy is introduced to Darcy's younger sister, Georgiana, and gets to know her and Darcy by socialising with them at Pemberley. Miss Bingley and Mrs Hurst are the same as ever. Love the podcast? Support us by purchasing some of our awesome merchandise on our RedBubble store. This episode features the voices of Olivia French as Elizabeth Bennet, Rya…
 
Mark, Wes, Dylan, Seth, and Brian Wilson continue working through the text, considering Sunzi's strategies and assumptions, and how these might (or might not) apply to competing in the business world. The post PREVIEW-Ep. 255: Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" (Part Two) first appeared on The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast.…
 
This week The Football Book Club podcast read 'Gamechanger' by YouTuber and Hashtag United founder Spencer Owen (AKA Spencer FC)... who just so happens to be joining them for an in-depth interview. In this bumper episode, we had the chance to chat to Spencer about his life and career so far - from playing FIFA in front of millions on YouTube to fou…
 
Dear Diary, Who Am I? A 4th grader tries to solve a mystery about why she feels different. The Mortified Podcast is a proud member of Radiotopia. Listen to the whole series. Autism Resources: Autism Self-Advocacy Group, [Autistic Women and Non-Binary Network](http:// https://awnnetwork.org/), Wrong Planet Forums, The Guide to Good Mental Health on …
 
This week, we conclude our journey with Sonali Dev's Recipe For Persuasion! Ashna Raje has overcome so much to find her way back to Rico and reconciles with her mother, Shobi. Growth! We love to see it. Send us suggestions of what we should cover next! ~~~ Send us your questions or comments at: thepemberleypodcast@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter/Ins…
 
Chris Matheson has written many comic movies and has converted religious texts into funnier books, most recently with The Buddha's Story. Mark, Erica, and Brian talk with him about what unifies these projects: Why the big ideas of religion and sci-fi are begging to be made fun of. The post Pretty Much Pop #65: Cosmic Satire w/ “Bill & Ted” Writer C…
 
Hey y'all, Friend of the show Scottie joins us to talk about the third episode of the BBC/A&E adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. Our feelings cannot be repressed, we must tell you how ardently we admire and love having her on the show. Take care of yourselves, dear ones. Lots of love, Julie, Allison, and Janine (and Scottie)…
 
This week, we interview the wonderful and prolific author of RECIPE FOR PERSUASION, Sonali Dev. She recounts everything from where her love of Austen came from to her next novel in the Raje family saga. Follow Sonali on Twitter: @sonali_dev and Instagram: @sonali.dev You can also check out her website at: sonalidev.com ~~~ Send us your questions or…
 
Elizabeth and her family are enthralled by all that they encounter at Pemberley - the grounds, the estate, and even to their surprise, the charms of its owner, whom they unexpectedly meet during their visit. Love the podcast? Support us by purchasing some of our awesome merchandise on our RedBubble store. This episode features the voices of Olivia …
 
Author and journalist Fredrik deBoer discusses his book The Cult of Smart with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. DeBoer argues that there is little that can be done to change the distribution of success in K-12 education. He argues that educational reforms like charter schools and No Child Left Behind are doomed to failure. At the end of the conversation…
 
On the Chinese military treatise from around the 5th century BCE. How does a philosopher wage war? The best kind of war can be won without fighting. The general qua Taoist sage never moves until circumstances are optimal. We talk virtue ethics and practical strategy; how well can Sunzi's advice be applied to non-martial pursuits? With guest Brian W…
 
This week The Football Book Club are reading former United maverick and current Lyon striker Memphis Depay's 2019 book 'Heart of a Lion'. And who better to read it with them than journalist & The Athletic's Manchester United correspondent Carl Anka? In a book like no other we've read before, we're whisked from Ghana to Manchester, with a quick stop…
 
This week, we’re discussing The Woman of Colour: A Tale by Anonymous with Professor Kerry Sinanan. This unique 18th century text features a Black heiress in Regency England and draws comparisons to the film Belle. We talk about why it would make a great adaptation and revisit some thoughts from our Mansfield Park series.…
 
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