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The American Health Podcast is created by the Bloomberg American Health Initiative, a project of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The Initiative works to tackle some of the most pressing challenges to public health in the United States: Addiction and Overdose, Environmental Challenges, Obesity and the Food System, Risks to Adolescent Health and Violence. Visit http://americanhealth.jhu.edu to learn more.
 
Advancing Health Systems in Low and Middle Income Countries Podcast. This podcast series aims to help listeners appreciate why health finance and governance must be addressed when working to improve health outcomes, and will include episodes which delve into the dynamics of topics like domestic resource mobilization for health, expanding access to healthcare through insurance, and the importance of “good governance” in creating responsive, patient-centered health systems. The Health Finance ...
 
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Prior to Thanksgiving, the city of Philadelphia announced new COVID-19 restrictions to last for six weeks until January 1—some of the strictest recommendations the country has seen since the spring. Health commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley talks with Stephanie Desmon about these targeted restrictions the city hopes will prevent the current surge from …
 
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, rates of opioid overdose have increased dramatically but this is only due in part to disruption of services and increased isolation. Michael Botticelli, former head of the Office of National Drug Control Policy in the Obama administration and 32 years into his own recovery, talks with guest host Brendan Saloner abo…
 
How can people think about safety for holiday travel during the COVID-19 pandemic? Are some means of transport safer than others? What about safety during day-to-day transportation on school buses and trains? Dr. Mark Rosekind, a former administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and a Distinguished Policy Scholar at the Jo…
 
Last week, Nebraska ICU nurse Lacie Gooch recorded a video of herself after a long shift talking about the overwhelming number of people dying in hospitals from COVID-19. In a bonus episode of the podcast, Gooch talks with Stephanie Desmon about the viral video, and why frontline health care workers are taking to social media to describe the desper…
 
Last week, a judge approved the $8.3 billion settlement between the Department of Justice and OxyContin manufacturer Purdue Pharma. Hopkins opioids researcher Dr. Caleb Alexander talks with Stephanie Desmon about expected fallout from the settlement as well as how the COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating the crisis by disrupting drug markets, shutteri…
 
The Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs has worked for more than 30 years on health communication in at least 60 countries for issues like breastfeeding, HIV, and family planning. This experience meant they were well positioned to work with partners around the globe on messaging for COVID-19 prevention. Deputy director and COVID team le…
 
If I test positive for COVID-19, could my name and phone number be reported to the health department? How does closing bars at 10pm help? How will we know if COVID-19 vaccines work for children? My roommate and I have both tested positive—can we be in the same house together? Do I still have to wear a mask if I’ve recovered from COVID? Does mouthwa…
 
Pollution and racism go hand in hand: low-income, predominantly non-white communities with less capital and political power become dumping zones for hazardous waste and other toxic environmental exposures. As part of an ongoing series on structural racism and public health, Keshia Pollack Porter dives into the topic of environmental injustice with …
 
November 18 is the first National Injury Prevention Day. Injuries like burns, falls, and poisonings are the leading cause of death in the US for children over the age of 1 and most are preventable. Prevention experts Dr. Barbara Barlow, founder of a national coalition to prevent childhood injuries, Injury Free Coalition of Kids, and Eileen McDonald…
 
Denmark, one of world’s leading pelt producers, is culling all of its farmed mink after evidence that a different variant of SARS-CoV-2 might be circulating among the animals. Veterinary expert Dr. Meghan Davis returns to the podcast to talk with Stephanie Desmon about whether or not mink pose a danger to humans, what the news means for disease sur…
 
Once COVID-19 vaccines are widely available, could they be made mandatory and, if so, what entities could enforce this? Legal and public health expert Joanne Rosen talks with Stephanie Desmon about the legislative precedent for mandatory vaccinations that dates all the way back to a 1905 Supreme Court case after a smallpox outbreak in Massachusetts…
 
Kaiser Permanente, the largest not-for-profit health system in the US, has mobilized in response to COVID-19. Senior vice president and chief health officer Dr. Bechara Choucair talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about coaching for patients who test positive, contact tracing partnerships with local health departments, and a focus on addressing patients…
 
This week, Pfizer reported some encouraging early results from Phase III of it’s COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials. Dr. Josh Sharfstein talks with Stephanie Desmon about what might happen next, when we could see the first doses of vaccines available, and how we should continue vigilance with masks, distancing, and handwashing while waiting for wides…
 
High profile instances show up in the news as “super spreader” events, but there’s evidence that the phenomenon of “overdispersion” could be much more common. Infectious disease epidemiologist Dr. Justin Lessler and doctoral student Kyra Grantz talk with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the biological and social contributors to overdispersion, and what it…
 
Pneumonia is the leading killer of children under 5 around the world with most deaths in low- and middle-income countries. But it’s not just a problem of developing countries: pneumonia is also the most common reason for hospitalization of children in the US. In recognition of World Pneumonia Day, pediatric infectious disease specialist Dr. Anita S…
 
We’re closer to safe, effective COVID-19 vaccines, but what will the actual rollout look like? Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, a bioethicist and health policy expert recently appointed to President-elect Joe Biden’s coronavirus task force, talks with Stephanie Desmon about the challenges in distributing a vaccine in the US. They discuss which groups might get…
 
After the National Basketball Association shut down on March 11, the league was able to resume play and complete both its season and postseason without interruption from COVID-19 from the safety of “the bubble.” Pete Meisel, the NBA’s senior manager for player health and an alumnus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, talks with …
 
A disproportionate number of women in the U.S. appear to be “dropping out” of the workforce during the pandemic, presumably to care for children or because they are more likely to have jobs that cannot be done remotely. Stefania Albanesi, an economist at the University of Pittsburgh who studies women in the workforce, talks with Stephanie Desmon ab…
 
Before the pandemic, we didn’t know as much about how infectious respiratory diseases spread. New knowledge about COVID-19 can help us make informed decisions about risks but it has also led to mixed messages. Hopkins environmental epidemiologist Dr. Tom Burke and dean of the University of Colorado School of Public Health Dr. Jon Samet talk with St…
 
The pandemic has revealed major deficits in public health infrastructure and a lack of prioritization of prevention efforts: only 3% of all health dollars are spent on prevention. Dr. Ellen J. MacKenzie, dean of the Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Dr. Shelley Hearne, director of the School’s Center for Public Health Advocacy, talk with guest…
 
New York City’s contact tracing program, officially launched on June 1, is one of the largest in the nation. Dr. Jay Varma, the mayor’s senior adviser for public health, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the trained workforce of 4,000 people that is now reaching more than 90% of new cases in the city. The program also helps provide services like…
 
In the first of a periodic series on racism and health, Dr. Keshia Pollack Porter, vice dean for faculty and professor in Health Policy and Management, talks with Taylor Porter, a principal at Gamble Montessori High School in Cincinnati with a unique approach to learning that prioritizes the health and well-being of the whole child. Porter talks ab…
 
In this episode, Dr. Josh Sharfstein talks with Hopkins researchers who break down three new COVID-19 research papers: Dr. Andrew Redd talks about COVID-19 vaccines and whether they will work in older adults; Dr. Sheree Schwartz talks the about the implications of COVID-19 for pregnancy; and Dr. Denali Boon discusses a preprint paper about the pote…
 
The pandemic has elevated many of the risk factors of suicide, including loneliness, grief, economic distress, and a record number of people requesting new access to firearms which are involved in 50% of suicides. Hopkins suicide prevention expert Dr. Holly Wilcox talks with Stephanie Desmon about these risks, what the data are showing so far, and …
 
COVID-19 mortality rates are falling and better treatments are one of the main reasons why. Dr. Arturo Casadevall returns to the podcast to talk with Stephanie Desmon about where we are with different treatments and their successes, ongoing clinical trials, why some treatments are harder than others to produce, and whether we’ll continue to see inv…
 
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