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For ad-free listening, exclusive content and early access to new episodes, join Noiser+, now available on Apple Podcasts. All shows are also available for free. If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, press the '+' icon to follow the show for free. Real Dictators is the award-winning podcast hosted by Paul McGann that explores the hidden lives of history's tyrants. New episodes Wednesdays. Follow Noiser Podcasts on Twitter @Noiser_Podcasts for updates on our shows.
 
Plutarch’s Greeks and Romans is a bi-weekly podcast inspired by Plutarch’s ancient collection of biographies of famous Grecians and Romans. Plutarch was both a Greek and a Roman citizen living during the Pax Romana - the Golden Age of the Roman Empire. Our podcast will explore 50 persons Plutarch believed were most influential in the rise of Greek and Roman civilization, from legends such as Theseus and Romulus to conquerors like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, Plutarch had no shortag ...
 
David Hume is one of the great philosophers of the Western intellectual tradition. His philosophical writings earned him lasting fame and renown; his historical writing earned his bread and butter. His "The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688", published between 1754 and 1764, was immensely popular and Hume wrote that "the copy-money given me by the booksellers much exceeded any thing formerly known in England; I was become not only independent, bu ...
 
Caesar and Cleopatra, a play written in 1898 by George Bernard Shaw, was first staged in 1901 and first published with Captain Brassbound's Conversion and The Devil's Disciple in his 1901 collection, Three Plays for Puritans. It was first performed at Newcastle upon Tyne on March 15, 1899. London production was at the Savoy Theatre in 1907. Shaw wants to prove that it was not love but politics that drew Cleopatra to Julius Caesar. He sees the Roman occupation of ancient Egypt as similar to t ...
 
From Julius Caesar to the Kennedys, successful assassinations have played a significant role in the course of human civilization. This show isn't about those. Instead, we're looking at failed assassination attempts from throughout history. From near misses to disastrous blunders, these would-be assassinations often still made a major impact. Music by astrofreq from Pixabay.
 
Shakespeare was passionately interested in the history of Rome, as is evident from plays like Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, and Antony and Cleopatra. His tragedy Coriolanus was probably written around 1605-07, and dramatizes the rise and fall of a great Roman general, Caius Martius (later surnamed Coriolanus because of his military victory at Corioli). This play is unusual in that it provides a strong voice for the ordinary citizens of Rome, who begin the play rioting about the high price ...
 
Writer-director Chris Kublan and actor Michael Rispoli discuss their new comedy Friends and Romans. The comedy follows Nick DeMaio (Rispoli), an aspiring actor who's stuck playing gangsters in mafia films. When he and his fellow mob movie extras stage a production of "Julius Caesar" on Staten Island, they unwittingly attract the FBI's attention—with comical results.
 
Though it's titled The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, the man himself appears only in five scenes in the entire play! However, such is his impact on the events that surrounded him that he still remains the central figure in this psychological drama that combines politics, honor, assassination, betrayal, the lust for power, patriotism and friendship. Set in 44 BC in ancient Rome, it is one of William Shakespeare's early Tragedies. First thought to have been performed in September 1599, William Sha ...
 
•FBOL is now on Patreon! Subscribe: http://www.patreon.com/fuckboisoflit•The podcast about the most groan-worthy, enraging, and sh*t characters in lit. Join host Emily Edwards and a guest for a weekly "book club" discussion on every book you wanted to destroy in English class, but couldn't. Classic literature of Europe and the Americas– everything from mythology to Victorian epics to the modernists– is hard to get through, and each week, we take on a frequently assigned book to talk about al ...
 
The AIQ podcast (Antiquity in Question) is an academic podcast on the topic of ancient history. It's goal is to combine an academic approach to topics of the ancient world whilst still being interesting and fun for listeners who know little about history. The AIQ podcast covers topics such as the Romans, classical Greece and important figures in history like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar. You will listen to and be immersed into the fascinating world of Empires, Leaders and the comple ...
 
The Roman World introduces students to the society, literature and art of ancient Rome, through a study of its major historical and literary figures, such as Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Virgil and Ovid. We shall look at Rome’s place in the ancient Mediterranean world, and its connections with ancient Greece and other cultures, such as Egypt and Gaul. Through almost constant warfare, Rome accumulated an enormous Mediterranean empire, and this subject will investigate how this shaped Roman ...
 
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Biscuit Chats

WDAV Classical Public Radio

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WDAV's Biscuits and Bach host, Rachel Stewart, talks with musicians, artists, chefs, foodies and others about everybody's favorite topic - food.Subscribe to a podcast of this series via iTunes using the button below or visit our subscribe page for other options.Subscribe
 
Bonus episodes twice a month (the 15th and the 30th) https://www.patreon.com/historyfornightowls Youtube: #historyfornightowls Twitter: @alithehistorian Image: Julia Maesa of Emesa (Homs) Syria, part of the Severan dynasty. When the Roman Empire captured Egypt in the age of Julius Caesar and Cleopatra, no one could have predicted that Rome would come to control the entire territorial coastline of the Mediterranean. In the west, the empire stretched as far as Spain and Morocco. In the east th ...
 
This is truly a delightful compilation of some of the best known and loved passages from William Shakespeare's plays. Most readers would be familiar with all or at least some of them. If you've studied Shakespeare in school or college, plays like The Merchant of Venice and Macbeth were probably assigned texts. However, if you haven't encountered these plays before, Shakespeare Monologues is a great volume to browse through and enjoy at leisure. It's important to know that there is a distinct ...
 
A treasure trove of more than two hundred poems, this gem of an anthology compiled by Mary E Burt is indeed a most valuable set of poems to read or listen to. Published in 1904, Poems Every Child Should Know contains some well-loved verses like Thomas Gray's Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, Lewis Carroll's delightful parody Father William, Felicia Hemans' deeply-moving Casablanca and other favorites. It also has lesser-known but equally beautiful pieces like Henry Wadsworth Longfellow' ...
 
The French mathematician and philosopher, Blaise Pascal once remarked, “Cleopatra's nose. Had it been shorter, the whole face of the world would have been changed!” Such was the legendary power and attraction of this most famous woman ruler that generations of artists, readers, writers, historians and poets have ensured that she remains immortal and unforgettable. Jacob Abbott's Cleopatra is a work of historical biography, told in a highly dramatic and gripping style. It brings the character ...
 
If you thought history was dull, dry and boring, you haven't read Bill Nye's books! He brings wit, humor, satire, irony and sheer nonsensical fun into the subject, making it both entertaining and memorable. The Comic History of England was published posthumously in 1896 after the writer's tragic and untimely death half-way through the project. Hence it remains incomplete and covers the history of the island nation only up to the Tudor period. However, beginning with Julius Caesar, the Roman ...
 
Upstart Crow Youth Shakespeare Troupe presents Lend Me Your Earbuds: A Pandemic Shakespeare Podcast Series. Youth actors from the St. Anthony Park neighborhood of St. Paul, Minnesota tell three of Shakespeare’s beloved stories in three episodes. Using Shakespeare’s words and themes as their touchstone, the actors give each of the plays their own unique, contemporary and authentically Shakespearean treatment.
 
'Women and Shakespeare' features conversations with diverse creatives and academics who are involved in making and interpreting Shakespeare. In the conversations, we find out both how Shakespeare is used to amplify the voices of women today and how women are redefining the world's most famous writer. Sponsored by NYU Global Faculty Fund Award.
 
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Caesar departs Egypt with his lover, Cleopatra, secure on the throne. After crushing Pompey’s allies, he returns to Rome. His rule proves popular with the masses. But senators grow concerned by his increasing megalomania. With the Ides of March approaching, conspirators hatch an historic assassination plot… A Noiser production, written by Jeff Daws…
 
Journalist and author Leslie Gray Streeter (@LeslieStreeter) is here to discuss all the ramifications of Mark Twain's most celebrated classic novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. From how to present the audio book (don't, maybe?), to who is the sociopath of the novel (not Huck!), we get into it, and discuss how our relationship to this novel …
 
This week the LU boys return from their time in the desert to explore the Chinese spiritual and political group Falun Gong, and the various ways in which they have evolved and spread since the 90’s. Ever seen a poster for Shen Yun? Well, you’ve been touched… by Falun Gong. Reach the Practitioners here: @leftunreadpod @poorfidalgo @gluten_yung email…
 
I’m going to begin this episode with a famous quote from Edward Gibbon, from his massive work, the History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: The decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness...... The story of its ruin is simple and obvious; and instead of inquiring why the Roman empire was destroyed, we s…
 
On this episode: Elizabeth and Zak are joined by Amber O’Neal Johnston. She’s the author of A Place to Belong: Celebrating Diversity and Kinship in the Home and Beyond and has a blog called Heritage Mom. They talk about how families can celebrate their own identities while learning about and appreciating other people’s races and cultural difference…
 
This week James and Jess quiz TikTok sensations 'The Sugarcoated Sisters' on their searches. What is the cut-off point for self-cleaning armpits? Why is their Mum getting so frustrated with them? What would Gordon Brown's role be in the Tony Blair Rock Opera? Find out more in this week's episode ;) Buy tickets to their Edinburgh Fringe show in Augu…
 
Antony becomes disgruntled with the tedious administrative duties of running an Empire. Cleopatra makes an unexpected appearance, pushing for the legitimacy of her son by Caesar, and Vorenus embarks upon his latest career path as a crime boss of the Aventine. Raising Standards, an occasional rewatch podcast of HBO’s Rome, hosted by Rhiannon Evans a…
 
Every year Rome held an election in which two senators were chosen for the role of consul. Being elected consul was a great honour, and the position was hotly contested, and a successful campaign depended upon the candidate’s military achievements, rhetorical skills and their willingness to be corrupt. Now funding on Kickstarter: Agricola (the podc…
 
Writer and comedian Katharine LaRonde (@KatLaRonde) graces us with her presence to discuss our "homegirl" Laura in Tennessee Williams's first and most famous play, THE GLASS MENAGERIE. SUMMARY Amanda is a struggling single mother to two children in their 20s– Tom, who works at a shoe factory, and Laura, who is self conscious about a slight physical…
 
Caesar’s campaign in Gaul begins. An invasion on an epic scale, it will also include two missions to the rain-lashed island of Britain. Back home, however, the collapse of the Triumvirate pushes Rome towards civil war. The conflict will spill across the Mediterranean, driving Julius Caesar into the arms of a certain Queen Cleopatra… A Noiser produc…
 
When Samantha and her husband moved from a condo to a fairly large house, they knew they’d have a lot of updating and upkeep to do. But they had no idea how much time their new chores would gobble up. Or even what chores to do. (If only there was a guide to adulting!) Even when they weren’t holding themselves to picture-perfect standards, it still …
 
On this episode: Jamilah, Elizabeth, and Zak talk about the wave of anti-trans legislation, the role of misinformation in this movement, and how to protect trans kids. They are joined by Jules Gill-Peterson. She is a trans historian and author of Histories of the Transgender Child, and co-host of Slate’s very own Outward podcast. Recommendations Ja…
 
WE ARE BACK. Yes on May 13'th I am doing a livestream on youtube at 4:00 PM eastern time (unless something comes up and I can't do it) This episode I am going to talk about the carnivores featured in the Jurassic World Dominion trailer. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a …
 
In the late third century, the Roman Empire was changing rapidly. Civil war had done much to contribute to its near destruction. Now, the radical Emperor Diocletian came up with an innovative solution for this - the Tetrarchy. He also decided to confront a strange new religion that was increasingly a threat to the traditional Roman gods - Christian…
 
With one million dead from COVID, many Americans are suffering through profound grief. And for Black Americans, the pandemic combined with the racial reckoning has made the mourning feel endless. On this week’s episode of A Word, Jason Johnson talks with writer Marisa Renee Lee about her new book Grief Is Love: Living With Loss, and about making sp…
 
This week, journalist and co-founder of the Pittsburgh Institute for Nonprofit Journalism, Jody DiPerna (@JodyDiPerna) is here to discuss my favorite play by one of my favorite writers, ENDGAME by Samuel Beckett. To hear the whole episode, become a patron at http://www.patreon.com/fuckboisoflit Follow FBOL on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/fuckboi…
 
A brief update on the current status of the podcast, the road ahead, and some musings on how absolutely terrible everything is here in the good ol' U S of A. We will be back to our regularly scheduled programming soon enough. Until then... You can follow the covert operation known as the Evan Files on the Muskverse: @leftunreadpod (Twitter and Inst…
 
Politician, writer, warrior, lover... Julius Caesar was the dictator-for-life who became the absolute ruler of Rome and its domains. His life was a series of extraordinary and gruesome adventures. The young student kidnapped by pirates. The general who butchered the people of Gaul and led the Roman legions into Britain. The lothario famously entran…
 
This week, host June Thomas talks to Hannah Kirshner, author of Water, Wood, and Wild Things: Learning Craft and Cultivation in a Japanese Mountain Town. In the interview, Hannah explains how her original plan to write a cookbook turned into an immersive reporting experience, where she practiced and documented multiple artisanal disciplines, like s…
 
More than two years have passed since the death of Caesar, and we now find our story at the final battle of the Liberator’s war. Octavian and Mark Antony lead their forces west to confront Cassius and Brutus, who have amassed quite the army in the meantime. Part VI of 'The Liberator's War' Guest: Assistant Professor Steele Brand (History, The King’…
 
We're here to ruin one of Emily's childhood books, Ellen Raskin's THE WESTING GAME. As it turns out, it's pretty racist, ableist, and glorifies the owner of a company town. Woo hoo? Follow my guest, Taverlee Laskauskas, on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TaverleeJaye Get the rest of this episode on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/fuckboisoflit Summary…
 
The War to End All Wars, The Great War, World War One—whatever you want to call it, it was a kinda a big deal. For those who've learned about WWI in school, you've most likely heard it in connection with the the assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand. Some claim the bullet that took the Arch Duke's life was the sole cause of this global conflic…
 
You’ve probably heard about the importance of journaling, putting thoughts on paper to help process the daily vicissitudes of life. But it’s easy to stall once you see a blank page or get self conscious about what exactly you’re writing. On this episode of How To!, we bring together Anna Quindlen, bestselling novelist and author of the new book Wri…
 
When we think of method acting, we tend to think of actors going a little over the top for a role – like Jared Leto, who allegedly sent his colleagues dead rats when he was preparing to be The Joker, or Robert De Niro refusing to break character on the set of the movie Raging Bull. But that’s not how method acting began. On this episode of Decoder …
 
Octavian, Mark Antony and Lepidus have secured their alliance against Caesar's assassins, and since they have control of Rome, it's time for them to get rid of any competition. Proscribing an enemy means they will likely be executed, and their personal fortunes can be confiscated and put towards paying soldiers - and the second triumvirate make ful…
 
In The Invention of Norman Visual Culture: Art, Politics, and Dynastic Ambition (Cambridge UP, 2020), Lisa Reilly establishes a new interpretive paradigm for the eleventh and twelfth-century art and architecture of the Norman world in France, England, and Sicily. Traditionally, scholars have considered iconic works like the Cappella Palatina and th…
 
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