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Best Law podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Law podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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What defines guilt? Should we judge the accused based on the evidence found against them? Or by the decision made about them by a jury of their peers? Each week we look at complicated criminal cases, where the evidence and the verdict don’t always line up, testing the limits of “innocent until proven guilty.” Not Guilty is a production of Cutler Media and part of the Parcast Network.
 
The Lawfare Podcast features discussions with experts, policymakers, and opinion leaders at the nexus of national security, law, and policy. On issues from foreign policy, homeland security, intelligence, and cybersecurity to governance and law, we have doubled down on seriousness at a time when others are running away from it. Visit us at www.lawfareblog.com.
 
Every episode, legal expert Andrew and comic relief Thomas will tackle a popular legal topic and give you all the tools you need to understand the issue and win every argument you have on Facebook, with your Uncle Frank, or wherever someone is wrong on the Internet. It's law. It's politics. It's fun. We don't tell you what to think, we just set up the Opening Arguments.
 
The courtroom can be a battlefield over money, people’s rights, and even their lives. For some cases, the consequences can affect us long after the verdict is read. Based on extensive interviews and court transcripts, Wondery’s new podcast LEGAL WARS puts you inside the jury box of some of the most famous court cases in American history, including Hulk Hogan’s courtroom wrestling match with Gawker, the battle for free speech on the internet, and the Rodney King trial that set off the LA Riot ...
 
Professor Elizabeth Joh teaches Intro to Constitutional Law and most of the time this is a pretty straight forward job. But with Trump in office, everything has changed. Five minutes before class Professor Joh checks Twitter to find out what the 45th President has said and how it jibes with 200 years of the judicial branch interpreting and ruling on the Constitution. Hosted by acclaimed podcaster Roman Mars (99% Invisible, co-founder Radiotopia), this show is a weekly, fun, casual Con Law 10 ...
 
Host June Grasso speaks with prominent attorneys and legal scholars, analyzing major legal issues and cases in the news. The show examines all aspects of the legal profession, from intellectual property to criminal law, from bankruptcy to securities law, drawing on the deep research tools of BloombergLaw.com.
 
Imagine being wrongfully convicted for a crime you didn't commit, or imagine your child's killer is still on the loose even though there's enough evidence for an arrest. I want to help shine light on the injustices of our judicial system. I delve into court documents, attend trials, and interview those close to the case to help me tell their stories.
 
Law Pod UK covers developments across all aspects of civil and public law in the United Kingdom. It is brought to you by the barristers at 1 Crown Office Row with presenters Rosalind English and Emma-Louise Fenelon. More info on our highly recommended podcast on the UK Human Rights Blog.
 
Thinking Like A Lawyer is a podcast featuring Above the Law’s Elie Mystal and Joe Patrice. Each episode, the hosts will take a topic experienced and enjoyed by regular people, and shine it through the prism of a legal framework. This will either reveal an awesome rainbow of thought, or a disorienting kaleidoscope of issues. Either way, it should be fun.
 
From the producers of Up and Vanished, Sworn pulls back the curtain on the criminal justice system, exposing the untold stories and hard truths behind major cases. Host Philip Holloway, a defense attorney and former prosecutor with a background in law enforcement, not only digs into the legal aspects of these cases but the emotional consequences of their outcomes.
 
At Liberty is a weekly podcast from the ACLU that explores the biggest civil rights and civil liberties issues of the day. Join ACLU attorney Emerson Sykes as he and guests try to make some sense of what’s going on in our country. A production of ACLU, Inc.
 
The Let’s Go To Court podcast brings together two of the greatest legal minds of our time. Just kidding. We’re your hosts Brandi Egan and Kristin Caruso. What we lack in legal training we more than make up for in being completely obsessed with lawsuits. Every week, we discuss two juicy legal battles. Each episode is peppered with Brandi’s booming laugh and Kristin’s Olympic-level talent for putting the word “so” into every sentence. The podcast started in 2018, but we’ve been having these co ...
 
How can you avoid trespassing while playing Pokemon GO? Is "To Catch a Predator" entrapment? Can you use a spring gun in the fall? Lawyer Mike Meadows and his dude like brother-in-law Tommy Smirl tackle the pressing issues of the day in a legal podcast geared to educate and entertain lawyers and non-lawyers alike.
 
Boom! Lawyered is friendly and entertaining legal analysis for anyone passionate about reproductive justice. Join Rewire.News legal experts Jessica Mason Pieklo and Imani Gandy as they explore the important issues coming up in the courts, how the legal system works, and what the case outcomes will mean for all of us. Part of the Rewire.News podcast network.
 
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show series
 
Here's the secret not found in the movie of the same name. The secret to engaging and leveraging the Law of Attraction is found in the absolute acceptance of what is. Let's imagine now that nothing exists outside the present moment. The past no longer exists and the future has not happened yet. By resisting what's happening in the moment (because y…
 
Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Professor Melissa Murray of NYU School of Law and Jeffrey Toobin of the New Yorker for a round table discussion of the big abortion case of the term, why Chief Justice John Roberts chose to strike down the Louisiana abortion law in June Medical Services LLC v Russo, and why opinion about Roberts’ opinion seems to be div…
 
Harold Krent, a professor at the Chicago-Kent College of Law, discusses the power Chief Justice John Roberts has, being the chief and now the swing vote on the Supreme Court. Richard Garnett, a professor at Notre Dame Law School, discusses the Supreme Court decision that states must include religious schools in programs that offer taxpayer subsidie…
 
This week on NSL Podcast, co-hosts Steve Vladeck and Bobby Chesney review and debate the latest national security legal news, including: Russian “bounties” on U.S. forces in Afghanistan, including (theoretical) legal implications A district court ruling finding the government lacks sufficient evidence to hold Adham Hassoun under Section 412 of the …
 
A new account compiles the acts of racism that compound at Harvard Law School, but they could emanate from almost any law school. We take a look at this account and the response of law schools around the country to recent events, including one law school that's taking an aggressive anti-racism stance. Also, we discuss Neomi Rao's Michael Flynn opin…
 
This is the fifth episode of a mini series on redundancy in which I will focus on all aspects of redundancy and how to ensure you get things right. In this episode I will cover: Why you need to consider alternative vacancies within your organisation The legal obligation upon you to inform ‘redundant’ employees When you need to search for group comp…
 
The Covid-19 crisis has transformed our family law courts. In response to a surge in disputes over parenting plans, the Family Law Courts created a Covid-19 List to hear urgent cases using Microsoft Teams. And this is not an isolated example, right now most hearings are taking place in a virtual space rather than in a bricks and mortar courtroom. S…
 
In this special edition of Talking Feds, Joyce Vance hosts a conversation with Maya Wiley, Barbara McQuade, and Jill Wine-Banks. The four discuss police reform, the Barr-Berman debacle and the testimonies of Aaron Zelinsky and John Elias, two current assistant United States attorneys, who talked about politically motivated prosecutions. They close …
 
In a historic shift, the University of California, Board of Regents has endorsed a constitutional amendment that would repeal the affirmative action ban approved by voters in 1996. But, is this a step forward for diversity or a step back? Former UC Regent Ward Connerly and Audrey Dow from The Campaign for College Opportunity weighed in on both side…
 
As people around the world continue to protest police brutality, Republicans and Democrats in Congress have proposed bills that would reform policing across the U.S. But in the American system, states are given a lot of latitude over law enforcement, down to the use of tactics like chokeholds and tear gas. Given the constitution, what can the feder…
 
Recent protests over police brutality have raised the volume on calls to defund the police. But while police abolition may be new to some, it's a concept that has been studied and discussed for decades. In his 2017 book, The End of Policing, Alex S. Vitale explains the troubling origins of modern policing, why commonly suggested reforms like traini…
 
Summer school is starting early in the faculty lounge. On this episode, Professors Epstein and Yoo have a full agenda: Are Minnesota prosecutors setting themselves up for a fall in the Derek Chauvin case? Should the Supreme Court have taken a case that could have allowed it to pare back qualified immunity? What should we make of Justice Gorsuch's s…
 
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