show episodes
 
A monthly conversation about books and ideas on NTS Radio hosted by friends Carrie Plitt, a literary agent, and Octavia Bright, a writer and academic. Each show features an author interview, book recommendations, lively discussion and a little music too, all built around a related theme - anything from the novella to race to masculinity. Listen live on NTS Radio www.nts.live
 
Podcast about academia, culture, and social justice across the STEM/humanities divide. Dr. Liz Wayne and Dr. Christine "Xine" Yao are two women of color Ivy League PhDs navigating higher education. Biomedical engineer meets literary critic. Both fans of lipstick.
 
Stories about how literature sounds. SpokenWeb is a monthly podcast that shares stories from the audio archives of Canadian literary history. Drawing on Canadian literary archival recordings from across Canada, episodes are snapshots of Canadian literary history and contemporary responses to it, including interviews, panel discussions, lectures, readings, and audio essays.
 
Shelf Love explores fictional stories of romantic love across media, time, and cultures. For the curious and open-minded who joyfully question as they consume pop culture. What's love got to do with it? Quite a bit! From the page to the stage, on the screen or in the wrestling ring: Shelf Love invites experts to share their knowledge and love for diverse genres and how they help us explore romantic love, including romance novels, comic books, soap operas, romantic comedies, video games, oral ...
 
A book podcast that discusses a wide variety of fiction including historical fiction, literary fiction, fantasy, sci-fi, horror, etc. and the occasional non-fiction title as well--we are two book lovers re-discovering our passion for books in our adult life and we hope to provide a biweekly platform to share with other like minded readers
 
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Particular Good

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Particular Good

St. Bernard's School of Theology and Ministry

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The Particular Good podcast is focused on literature, theology, and philosophy. Our title is inspired by St. Thomas, who said humans by nature are made for particular goods. Elif Batumann, novelist and literary critic, pictures writers as bookkeepers keeping a double-ledger of life and literature, looking at people and objects in life and on pages and saying: what is it? On the Particular Good podcast, our goal is take out the ledger, pay attention, and pursue truth in its particular good.
 
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CLEWS

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CLEWS

Laura James and Christopher Ray

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CLEWS is a library devoted to top-shelf, literary, culturally significant true crime stories from around the world. Our chairs rest at the intersection of history, journalism, law, and murder. Every episode is the product of meticulous research and analysis that will inform, entertain, teach, and surprise even the most knowledgeable true crime aficionado. Episodes featuring true stories alternate with episodes devoted to interviews of today's best-selling true crime authors. Lead author Laur ...
 
A collection of essays on 19th century novelists, both famous ones and those largely forgotten now. Among the writers presented most wrote in English, but three foreign authors are also discussed. Phelps taught a course on novels at a university and he added to those biographical essays some of his ideas about the importance of novels in the process of teaching about literature. (Summary by Piotr Nater)
 
Every two weeks, your hosts Sam and Lauren watch a movie, do some homework, and create Check Your Threading, a podcast that serves up history, psychology, and perspective on that film. Our goal is to talk about movies in a way that's easily accessible for our listeners—we believe art is for everyone! IG: checkyourthreading / Twitter: checkthreading
 
Wit & Lit is a podcast where we embrace our most witty and Oscar Wilde selves whilst we read. Published every full moon ❍ in time to discuss literature under the stars from our gutters and under the moon with the wolves. Minisodes uploaded on the new moon ◉.Literature, History, Art, Intersectionality, Feminism, Oh my!
 
We’re a publisher dedicated to extraordinary, ground-breaking, unique fiction and non-fiction writers and their work. Founded in 1994, Riverhead Books is now well established as a publisher of bestselling literary fiction and quality nonfiction. Throughout its history, Riverhead has been dedicated to publishing extraordinary groundbreaking, unique writers. Riverhead’s books and authors have won or been finalists for Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards, National Book Critic Circle Awards, M ...
 
Named a "prophet of British imperialism" by the young George Orwell, and born in Bombay, India, Rudyard Kipling had perhaps the clearest contemporary eye of any who described the British Raj. According to critic Douglas Kerr: "He is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experi ...
 
The 702 Book Club chooses one book at the beginning of each month, and on the last Thursday of each month, 702 Mornings presenter Deborah Cameron and the programs literary critic Geordie Williamson discuss the book with listeners and readers, who are also encouraged to put their own reviews and thoughts on the Books Club website
 
Are you ready to go back to the year 2000? Combining storytelling and commentary, this podcast returns to some of the noughties’ biggest cultural moments, trends and figures, and explores them with the added benefit of twenty years’ hindsight. The world of entertainment is re-examined by hosts Simran Hans and Tara Joshi, two self-proclaimed fangirls who grew up on the internet. Film critic, Simran, and music critic, Tara, explore how it feels to return to the defining songs, shows and sleepo ...
 
In today's publishing landscape, you can reach fans all over the world. Query letters are a thing of the past. You don't even need a literary agent. There is nothing standing in the way of making a living from writing. Join the two bestselling fantasy authors, Autumn and Jesper, every Monday, as they explore the writing craft, provides tips on publishing, and insights on how to market your books.
 
Professor of Poetry Alice Oswald gives her lectures on poetry, language, literature, beauty and life every term. The Professor of Poetry lectures were conceived in 1708 by Berkshire landowner Henry Birkhead and began after he bequeathed some money so it could be a valuable supplement to the curriculum. He believed ‘the reading of the ancient poets gave keenness and polish to the minds of young men as well as to the advancement of more serious literature both sacred and human’. The first poet ...
 
Christmas Eve. Guests round a fireside begin telling each other ghost stories. One of them relates a true incident involving the governess of his little nephew and niece. Strange events begin to take place, involving the housekeeper, a stranger who prowls round the grounds, a mysterious woman dressed in black and an unknown misdemeanor committed by the little nephew. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James was published in 1893 and it remains one of the best-known and admired works of this grea ...
 
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show series
 
The Rādhā Tantra is an anonymous 17th-century tantric text from Bengal. Mans Broo's The Rādhā Tantra: A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation (Routledge, 2019) offers a lively picture of the meeting of different religious traditions in 17th century Bengal, since it presents a Śākta version of the famous Vaiṣṇava story of Rādhā and Kṛṣṇa. This …
 
Superman, Batman, Captain America, and Iron Man are names that are often connected to the expansive superhero genre, including the multi-billion-dollar film and television franchises. But these characters are older and have been woven into American popular culture since their inception in the early days of comic books. The history of these comic bo…
 
This minisode we are leaning even further into our autumnal and back to school-ish vibe to talk about The Campus Novel, a genre that includes some beloved books and some much less beloved books, but remains enduring nevertheless. Why is there such an appetite for novels about university life? Are these stories mostly wish fulfilment narratives for …
 
The World’s Worst Woman – Countess Marie O’Rourke Tarnovska CLEWS tells of the most prolific femme fatale known to mankind and the most celebrated murder trial in the history of Venice. Countess Marie Nicolaevna O’Rourke Tarnovska was the “Russian Delilah” – a woman who orchestrated scenes worthy of Tolstoy. Except - Anna Karenina was a piker compa…
 
In this News Brief, we recap the recap of Powell's life, from the handwringing over his Iraq War UN speech to the erasure of his role in covering up My Lai massacre to training rightwing death squads in Central America and the central importance of "Good Intentions" when venerating our beloved, bipartisan war-makers.…
 
What do you do when you're not asleep and when you're not eating? You're most likely waiting--to finish work, to get home, or maybe even to be seen by your doctor. Hold On is less about how to manage all that staying where one is until a particular time or event (OED) than it is about describing how we experience waiting. Waiting can embrace things…
 
All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature (Cornell UP, 2021) explores how Russian writers from the mid-1920s on have read and responded to Joyce's work. Through contextually rich close readings, José Vergara uncovers the many roles Joyce has occupied in Russia over the last century, demonstrating how the writers Yury Olesha,…
 
Greg Vargo's Chartist Drama (Manchester UP, 2021) opens a window into a fascinating aspect of working-class radical drama. This book includes scripts of four dramas performed or published by members of the Chartist movement, as well as an informative introduction situating these plays in their historical context. Ranging from history plays to polit…
 
Counting Dreams: The Life and Writings of the Loyalist Nun Nomura Bōtō (Cornell UP, 2021) tells the story of Nomura Bōtō, a Buddhist nun, writer, poet, and activist who joined the movement to oppose the Tokugawa Shogunate and restore imperial rule. Banished for her political activities, Bōtō was imprisoned on a remote island until her comrades resc…
 
Is it real love or fantasy TV? I hope you're here for the right reasons: to learn how The Bachelor franchise produces a fantasy of romantic love. We cover the lingo (Rose Ceremony, Fantasy Suite, Frankenbiting), the scandals, the couples, and all of the commercially-viable aesthetically romantic gestures that construct "romantic love" on The Bachel…
 
The best way to learn the craft of writing is to study the best of the best! Join us for our first critical reading episode where we take a look at the Hugo Award winning novel the Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin. We take a look at what this story does right... and what had us scratching our heads. Warning: there are spoilers if you haven't read the …
 
Rebirth of the English Comic Strip: A Kaleidoscope, 1847-1870 (UP of Mississippi, 2021) enters deep into an era of comic history that has been entirely neglected. This buried cache of mid-Victorian graphic humor is marvelously rich in pictorial narratives of all kinds. Author David Kunzle calls this period a "rebirth" because of the preceding long …
 
ShortCuts is back! Season Three of ShortCuts begins with a listening exercise. We attune our ears to what it sounds like and feels like to hear archival clips ‘cut’ out of context. Join ShortCuts producer Katherine McLeod in this exploration of the sonic and affective place-making of ShortCuts as podcast. What kind of creative and critical work can…
 
Jonathan Franzen’s new novel, “Crossroads,” has generated a lot of discussion, as his work tends to do. The novelist and critic Thomas Mallon, who reviewed “Crossroads” for us, is on the podcast this week to talk about the book and to place it in the context of Franzen’s entire career. “He is fundamentally a social novelist, and his basic unit of s…
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to st…
 
Masterminds and masterclasses has been around for quiet a while - and for good reason. The best thing you can do for your author career is to invest in yourself. To learn and grow. In this episode of the Am Writing Fantasy podcast, Autumn and Jesper share some of their personal experiences from being part of masterminds, as well as, thoughts on why…
 
The fashionable and decorous men whom we recognize in portraits and letters from the Italian Renaissance penned some of the most scathing critiques of the courts in which they served. Such anti-courtly discourse furnished a platform for discussing pressing questions of early modern Italian society. The court was the space that witnessed a new form …
 
What is a memoir? What makes a memoir both nonfictional and literary? What are the memoirist’s moral obligations to the people they write about besides themselves, and to their potential readers? And is the writing of a memoir just indulging in narcissism, or revenge? In Artful Truths: The Philosophy of Memoir (University of Chicago Press, 2021), H…
 
Welcome to Top Shelf Reads. On today’s episode Naomi chats about the national book award finalists, Nick reviews The Promise and The Satanic Verses and we discuss creepypasta. 00:00 -- Abdulrazak Gurnah wins the Nobel Prize in Literature 02:15 -- National Book Awards 2021 Finalists 09:15 -- Short teaser impressions about Song for the Unraveling of …
 
In 2013, the front page of The New York Times devoted five straight days to the story of Dasani, an 11-year-old Black girl who lived in a homeless shelter in Brooklyn. Now, Andrea Elliott, the reporter of that series, has published her first book, “Invisible Child,” which tells the full story of Dasani and her family up to the present day. On this …
 
Introducing a This Creative Life special season: The Launch Box, in which Andrew DeYoung and I take you through the six-month period leading up to publication of our new books as we each publish for the first time in new categories. This series will cover a Big Five middle grade launch, a midsize-publisher adult literary launch, and a self-publishe…
 
Author Mike Jung joins me for the first of a new batch of fall episodes. We talk about the events of his early life that put him on the path to being a writer, his publishing stories and writing process, a later-life autism diagnosis, and BTS. Thanks so much for being back with us for a new season! Mike Jung Support This Creative Life Get the email…
 
Ricardo Wilson speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his poem, “nigrescence,” which appears in The Common’s spring issue. In this conversation, Ricardo talks about his new collection Apparent Horizon and Other Stories, winner of the PANK Book Contest in fiction. The collection includes several short poetic fragments scattered amongst storie…
 
As this book intriguingly explores, for those who would make Rome great again and their victims, ideas of Roman decline and renewal have had a long and violent history. The decline of Rome has been a constant source of discussion for more than 2200 years. Everyone from American journalists in the twenty-first century AD to Roman politicians at the …
 
Can you have freedom without constraint? What role does it play in creativity, and can it be productive as well as limiting? This month our guest is the thinker and writer Maggie Nelson, whose latest book, On Freedom, explores the concept of freedom via four wide-ranging essays about art, sex, drugs and climate. Its subtitle is Four Songs of Care a…
 
In this recording of a Live Interview for Patrons from 9/22, we speak with The Nation sports editor Dave Zirin about his new book, The Kaepernick Effect, and how a series of protests in youth sports, namely among black youth, set off firestorms and backlash in dozens of small towns throughout the country. And what the "leave politics out of sports"…
 
CLEWS takes you back to ancient Greece. When a beautiful courtesan is charged with shameless revelry, a famous trial lawyer comes to the rescue of the damsel in legal distress. This is the amazing but true story of Phryne (or Frine) and her attorney, Hypereides, and the most shocking closing argument of all time. Sources: Laura James, The beauty de…
 
How do romantic narratives explore or influence our ideas of which bodies are "desirable"? Dr. Christina Fattore will introduce us to neoliberalism, and we'll discuss how the ideological focus on individual agency influences our ideas of which bodies are most desirable to acquire in romantic partners and how individuals must produce desirable bodie…
 
Have you ever opened a fantasy book, looked at the map, and wondered what the author was thinking? Jesper and Autumn pull out their favorite worst fantasy maps and a few map pet-peeves in this humorous episode of the Am Writing Fantasy podcast. Oh, plus a ghost story and more! Join our Fantasy Map Masterclass at https://ultimatefantasywritersguide.…
 
An An Ise monogatari Reader: Contexts and Receptions (Brill, 2021) is the first collection of essays in English on The Ise Stories, a canonical literary text ranked beside The Tale of Genji. Eleven scholars from Japan, North America, and Europe explore the historical and political context in which this literary court romance was created, or relate …
 
For decades, scholars have been calling into question the universality of disciplinary objects and categories. The coherence of defined autonomous categories—such as religion, science, and art—has collapsed under the weight of postmodern critiques, calling into question the possibility of progress and even the value of knowledge. Jason Ānanda Josep…
 
Pieter Vanhove’s World Literature After Empire: Rethinking Universality in the Long Cold War (2021), engages with the idea of ‘world’ as it manifests in literary and philosophical studies. Taking an interdisciplinary and multilingual approach, Vanhove centers his discussion on literature and the arts, while drawing an important historical tableau o…
 
Today, we are welcoming you to Season 3 by reintroducing and replaying an episode that exemplifies what our podcast is all about. In January 2020, we released the episode “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Elizabeth Smart” created by researcher and producer Myra Bloom. To kick off this season, Hannah and Myra sat down for a new introductory conversation…
 
In “Bewilderment,” Richard Powers’s first novel since he won a Pulitzer Prize for “The Overstory,” an astrobiologist named Theo Byrne looks for life on other planets while struggling to raise his highly sensitive 9-year-old son, Robin. On this week’s podcast, Powers compares Theo’s work in the galaxy with his relationship on the ground. “If there a…
 
The basic story of the rise, reign, and fall of deconstruction as a literary and philosophical groundswell is well known among scholars. In this intellectual history, Gregory Jones-Katz aims to transform the broader understanding of a movement that has been frequently misunderstood, mischaracterized, and left for dead—even as its principles and inf…
 
The first full-length biography of America's most celebrated novelist of the Great Depression to appear in a quarter century, Mad at the World illuminates what has made the work of John Steinbeck endure: his capacity for empathy. Pulitzer Prize finalist William Souder explores Steinbeck’s long apprenticeship as a writer struggling through the depth…
 
Charles and Marco interview Jordan Daniel Wood about his forthcoming book The Whole Mystery of Christ: Creation as Incarnation in Maximus Confessor (Notre Dame Press 2022). They talk about Maximus' christo-logic and how it works through his understanding of anthropology, deification, christology, particularly the suffering of Christ, and eschatolog…
 
Adult audiences only. CLEWS takes you back to the gin-fueled, jazz-filled nights in Chicago, Illinois when a good-looking woman could kill a man for no reason whatsoever -- other than to get her picture in the paper. Here is the story of the shocking murder epidemic that caused the deaths of three hundred husbands and boyfriends, and the scandalous…
 
Have you watched Netflix's The Chair? Join PhDivas Liz and Xine as they talk about all the uncomfortable resonances between their experiences as women of colour in academia and the short 'comedy' series starring Sandra Oh. (Yes, Xine even had a student describe her as 'if Sandra Oh were an academic.') They discuss antiblackness, model minority fail…
 
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