show episodes
 
This podcast is an introduction to Anglophone literature, from ancient times to the present, done by a Ph.D. with lots of books and musical instruments. A typical episode offers a summary of a work, or part of a work of literature, followed by some historical analysis. The episodes include original music, some comedy songs, and goofy jokes. You can listen to the shows in any order, although from time to time, episodes will make brief mention of previous or upcoming ones.
 
Every week, join award-winning narrator B.J. Harrison as he narrates the greatest stories the world has ever known. From the jungles of South America to the Mississippi Delta, from Victorian England to the sands of the Arabian desert, join us on a fantastic journey through the words of the world's greatest authors. Critically-acclaimed and highly recommended for anyone who loves a good story with plenty of substance.
 
Oh No! Lit Class is a semi-educational comedy literature podcast hosted by Megan and RJ, two bitter English grads who are here to tell you all the weird and sexy things you never knew about the books you had to read in school. Let's ruin some literary classics together. New episodes released every other Thursday.
 
Revealing, intimate conversations with visionaries and leaders in the arts, science, technology, public service, sports and business. These engaging personal stories are drawn from interviews with the American Academy of Achievement, and offer insights you’ll want to apply to your own life.
 
Christopher (@cdhermelin) and Drew (@drewsof) talk about reading, literature, publishing, and trying to make it through their never-dwindling stack of things to read. All with a themed drink in their hands. Recorded at the Damn Library in Brooklyn, NY. For show info, book lists, and drink recipes, visit somanydamnbooks.com
 
Presented by the Close Reads Podcast Network, The Daily Poem offers one essential poem each weekday morning. From Shakespeare and John Donne to Robert Frost and E..E Cummings, The Daily Poem curates a broad and generous audio anthology of the best poetry ever written, read-aloud by David Kern and an assortment of various contributors to the Close Reads network. Some lite commentary is included and the shorter poems are often read twice, as time permits. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...
 
A weekly podcast about books, writing, reading, and raccoons. Hosted by Mike Ingram and Tom McAllister, editors at Barrelhouse Magazine and authors of fiction and creative nonfiction. Winner of a 2015 Philadelphia Geek Award for Best Streaming Media Project. You don't need to read the books to enjoy the show!
 
A podcast series brought to you by Birlinn Limited, an independent publishing house based in Edinburgh, Scotland. Featuring readings, interviews with authors round-ups of the best new books from Scotland and beyond. Established in 1992, Birlinn Limited publishes books under a number of imprints: Birlinn; Polygon; BC Books; Arena Sport; and John Donald. Find out more at www.birlinn.co.uk.
 
Stories about how literature sounds. SpokenWeb is a monthly podcast that shares stories from the audio archives of Canadian literary history. Drawing on Canadian literary archival recordings from across Canada, episodes are snapshots of Canadian literary history and contemporary responses to it, including interviews, panel discussions, lectures, readings, and audio essays.
 
A Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) talking about the words in the English language that fascinate them most at the moment, looking at their histories and origins and trying to piece together just how they got to where they are today. This is a podcast for anyone interested in etymology (the study of words and their origins/history). If you've ever found yourself happier after discovering some bizarre bit of trivia about a word that you hadn't even given a second thought to (such as how the w ...
 
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show series
 
In this special Halloween episode, Jacke and Evie take a look at Edgar Allan Poe's great revenge story, "The Cask of Amontillado" (1846), written when Poe was destitute and in the depths of despair. Enjoy!Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, ja…
 
A young man visits his half-brother in Vancouver and steals a book that changes his life. An archeology student is befriended and brought to Iraq by a brother and sister who need his help in assessing a family art collection. A man who fought for the British in South Africa’s Boer War enlists as an American to fight in WWI Germany. Spanning decades…
 
John Cassavetes is known today as the father of American independent film, a pioneering writer, director, editor, actor who managed to make movies on his own terms, and has since inspired two generations of filmmakers. In his own day, however, he couldn’t catch a break–unappreciated and unseen by most of the public, lambasted by critics. But what c…
 
Today, David conducts his next interview with a member of the board game community who is an advocate for solitaire gaming in some way. Rob Daviau is a prolific board game designer who has designed or had a hand in over a hundred published games. Along with Matt Leacock, he designed the extremely successful Pandemic Legacy series, and Pandemic Lega…
 
Join award-winning writer and historian Alistair Moffat as he travels through the Highlands and Islands of Scotland in the steps of the extraordinary Holy Men who first brought the word of God to Scotland fourteen centuries ago. In this delightful podcast episode, Alistair Moffat details the lengths he went to in order to capture the 'spirit of pla…
 
The later epistles of the New Testament show early Christian theology expanding and evolving in the Ancient Mediterranean. Episode 80 Quiz: https://literatureandhistory.com/index.php/episode-80-quiz Episode 80 Transcription: https://literatureandhistory.com/index.php/episode-080-the-general-epistles Bonus Content: https://literatureandhistory.com/i…
 
Louise Glück, in full Louise Elisabeth Glück, (born April 22, 1943, New York, New York, U.S.), American poet whose willingness to confront the horrible, the difficult, and the painful resulted in a body of work characterized by insight and a severe lyricism. In 2020 she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, cited “for her unmistakable poetic v…
 
The European Union Prize for Literature aims to put the spotlight on the creativity and diverse wealth of Europe’s contemporary literature and to promote the circulation of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. To discuss the prize, the state of European literature and Britain's place in the post-Brexit international literary community…
 
From great new books to favorite classic reads, from news to the latest in on-screen adaptations, the Hey YA podcast is here to elevate the exciting world of young adult lit. Join hosts Kelly Jensen and Sarah Hannah Gómez on Wednesdays for recommendations, news, and lots of discussion about all things YA! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy inf…
 
Amanda and Jenn discuss fantasy heists, novellas, historical fiction about Italy, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Book Riot Insiders, the digital hangout spot for the Book Riot community, Book Trip, by C.J. Duarte, and Creatures by Crissy Van Meter, now in paperback from Algonquin Books. Subscribe to the …
 
So...there's an acclaimed spooky Gothic novel called Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier and there's a new original movie on Netflix also called Rebecca and, in theory, this episode is about that, and NOT Paul Hollywood, evil housekeepers that sound like Wario, or James Bond devouring a mansion. In theory. Happy Halloween everybody!…
 
Ghosts, magic, witches and sacrifice, just in time for Halloween! Kim talks to Sue Greaney and Joana Valdez-Tullet about folklore and prehistoric sites in Europe. Sue is working on. PhD about Neolithic sites in Britain and Ireland and is responsible for interpretation at Stonehenge for English Heritage but got into folklore due to a chance find in …
 
Today's poem is by "William Wordsworth, (born April 7, 1770, Cockermouth, Cumberland, England—died April 23, 1850, Rydal Mount, Westmorland), English poet whose Lyrical Ballads (1798), written with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the English Romantic movement." --bio from Britannica.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informat…
 
Chris Matheson has written many comic movies and has converted religious texts into funnier books, most recently with The Buddha's Story. Mark, Erica, and Brian talk with him about what unifies these projects: Why the big ideas of religion and sci-fi are begging to be made fun of. The post Pretty Much Pop #65: Cosmic Satire w/ “Bill & Ted” Writer C…
 
On this, the spookiest week of the year, we read two stories from the spookiest place on earth: South Carolina. Don't believe us? You will when these terrifying tales are through! Suggested talking points: Bristling with Fiber Optics, Cereal for Adults, The Dickhead Gambit, Pancake Gun, Choo Choo Tank, Baby's First Spooky Story, The Prize Man If yo…
 
Christopher and Drew discuss House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski at 20 years, Drew returning to the house and Christopher there for the first time. Plus, the pleasures of ergodic fiction, 3-D fiction, discussions of the Internet and how it fails us, and horror films and horror novels. It's spooky season, and the episode is bigger on the inside. …
 
Thrity Umrigar shares SUGAR IN MILK and BINNY’S DIWALI. These books represent two different strands of Thrity's life this year, as she puts it. Artist Khoa Le lends exquisite illustrations to SUGAR IN MILK to tell a story within a story of a girl who has recently immigrated to America and struggles to feel she belongs. The girl’s auntie comforts he…
 
In the late 1590s as William Shakespeare was writing Henry V, and the famous battle scene of Agincourt, there was a cultural battle going on between the older and younger generations of men in England concerning the use of the longbow. As Shakespeare staged Henry V in 1605, he did so with the obvious absence of the very longbows that are considered…
 
On the Chinese military treatise from around the 5th century BCE. How does a philosopher wage war? The best kind of war can be won without fighting. The general qua Taoist sage never moves until circumstances are optimal. We talk virtue ethics and practical strategy; how well can Sunzi's advice be applied to non-martial pursuits? With guest Brian W…
 
CW: cannibalism. In this episode, Hailey teaches Alexis about the continuous terrible decisions by the Essex whaling boys, Alexis would rather be eaten than be on a boat like they are, and the horrors of capitalism. Special thanks to Swing Whale for our music and to our patrons: Kathleen, Katelynn, Ashley, Loreena & Josh, Gamy, Sadie, Natalie, Nata…
 
George Orwell (1903-1950) was one of the twentieth century's great literary figures. An English novelist, who also excelled at essays and journalism, he fought all his life against injustice, snobbery, hypocrisy, deception (including self-deception), and lazy prose. In this episode, Mike Palindrome, president of the Literature Supporters Club, join…
 
Jeff and Rebecca mostly respond to listener ideas for bonus episodes. Some of it is even about books. This episode is sponsored by: This episode is sponsored by Macmillan Podcasts, Book Trip by C.J. Duarte, Mexican Gothic by Sylvia Moreno-Garcia, and Book Riot Insiders. Discussed in this episode: First Underground Railroad teaser trailer Toni Morri…
 
Whether he's advising Harry on which electives to take or polishing his Prefect's badge, Percy is well on his way to a meteoric rise to power by the end of his arc in the first three books! And in addition to discussing everyone's favorite HB, Alice and Martha relive some real weird childhood memories. Please consider supporting us on Patreon! www.…
 
Richard Seymour, author of The Twittering Machine, joins Eric and Kate to discuss the “social industry" — online platforms that monetize and manipulate our need to share our lives online. Seymour moves beyond the negative effects social media has on us as individuals and as a community, bringing into view a bigger picture: the social, economic, and…
 
Eva Chen shares 3 2 1 AWESOME! and ROXY THE LAST UNISAURUS REX. Eva’s JUNO VALENTINE series brings forth the world of fashion in an inviting and inclusive way that Eva herself describes as something of a fashion feminist fairy tale. The latest in the Junoverse is 3 2 1 AWESOME!: 20 Fearless Women Who Dared to be Different. Illustrated by Juno Valen…
 
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