show episodes
 
In 2003, the United States invaded Iraq without provocation. Most Americans supported the war—as did most politicians and intellectuals, both liberal and conservative. Today, it’s universally considered a disaster.Hosted by award-winning reporter Noreen Malone, the fifth season of Slow Burn explores the people and ideas that propelled the country into the Iraq War, and the institutions that failed to stop it. How did the Iraq catastrophe happen? And what was it like to watch America make one ...
 
Music, culture, the arts, maritime exploration - Renaissance England was an exciting place to be. So much happening! Breaks with Rome. Wars with France. And Scotland. And Spain! Twice a month, we'll look at some aspect of Renaissance England that will give you a deeper understanding into life in the 16th century. Go to http://www.englandcast.com for more info.
 
Revisionist History is Malcolm Gladwell's journey through the overlooked and the misunderstood. Every episode re-examines something from the past—an event, a person, an idea, even a song—and asks whether we got it right the first time. From Pushkin Industries. Because sometimes the past deserves a second chance.iHeartMedia is the exclusive podcast partner of Pushkin Industries.
 
The less-than-serious history podcast with stand up comedian Angela Barnes (The News Quiz, Mock The Week and Live at The Apollo) and writer John O'Farrell (An Utterly Impartial History of Britain, Things Can Only Get Better, Spitting Image). In each podcast our two history nerds discuss, explain and laugh at interesting and quirky episodes from the olden days, such as East German Nudism, Spy Pigeons or Vlad the Impaler. Angela and John’s in-depth knowledge of world history has been described ...
 
The Irish History Podcast brings you on a journey through Ireland's fascinating past. This podcast is not just dates but an enthralling account of Ireland's history, looking at daily life through the ages. The show is currently focused on the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s (see below), while the archive contains the stories of Ireland's ancient High Kings, Viking raiders and the Norman Invasion of the Middle Ages. The story of the Great Famine has proved the most popular to date, Between 18 ...
 
The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind Tides Of History, Fall Of Rome and ...
 
An affectionate meandering through the things that make England the way she is – from HP Sauce to the Allottment, Aethelstan to the politics of Queuing. With Luke Baxter, Roifield Brown, David Crowther and Fiona Powell trying to make some sense of it all, though rarely succeeding it might be said. And when you’ve listened, join us on Facebook, vote, and tell us what you think.
 
Live constitutional conversations and debates featuring leading historians, journalists, scholars, and public officials hosted at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and across America. To watch National Constitution Center Town Halls live, check out our schedule of upcoming programs at constitutioncenter.org/townhall. Register through Zoom to ask your constitutional questions in the Q&A or watch live on YouTube at YouTube.com/ConstitutionCenter.
 
The 1950s & 60s saw a wave of radical movements. Che Guevara and the Cuban Revolution. The Black Panthers. Quebec and Canada had the FLQ — a showdown that dissolved into crisis. By October 1970, there were soldiers in the streets, communities on edge, kidnapping and terror in the headlines. But those frightening weeks were just the crescendo of a wave of terror and violence that was nearly a decade in the making. This series will reveal the stories of that time through immersive storytelling ...
 
Annemarie Evans explores Hong Kong and digs up many aspects of our social, cultural, architectural and artistic heritage. Catch it live: Saturdays 7:30am - 8:00am, first broadcast Sundays 6:15pm - 6:45pm, repeat broadcast Podcast: Weekly update and available after its first broadcast. ************************* If you would like to share your story or idea with us, please contact us at hkhradio3@gmail.com *************************
 
History is Sexy is a podcast presented by historian Dr Emma Southon and writer Janina Matthewson answering listener questions about history. What did the Romans do for us? Where did marrying for love come from? What was world war one all about? Produced and edited by Oliver Kealey. Theme music by Ketsa.
 
The podcast that transports you to the ancient world and back, with some good conversation along the way. It's not just about ancient Greece. It's about a huge chunk of human history that the Greek texts give us access to: from Egypt and Babylon, to Persia, to Carthage and Rome, we'll sail the wine-dark sea of history with some expert guides at the helm. Topics will include archaeology, literature, and philosophy. New episode every month.
 
Travel back in time with me to some of the most fascinating moments in human history. Witness colossal sea battles involving tens of thousands of men, take part in pagan blood rituals in the mysterious forests of Northern Europe and engage in highly orchestrated tribal warfare within Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. All this and more from the comfort of your own living room/bus to work/toilet throne
 
Every generation of Americans has been faced with the same question: how should we live? Our endlessly interesting answers have created The American Story. The weekly episodes published here stretch from battlefields and patriot graves to back roads, school yards, bar stools, city halls, blues joints, summer afternoons, old neighborhoods, ball parks, and deserted beaches—everywhere you find Americans being and becoming American. They are true stories about what it is that makes America beaut ...
 
We’re living in unprecedented times. Maybe. In this show, Jody Avirgan, Nicole Hemmer and Kellie Carter Jackson (and guests) take one moment, big or small, from that day in U.S. political history and explore how it might inform our present –– all in about fifteen minutes. New episodes release Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays. Find us at ThisDayPod.com. We’re also posting about moments from the past @thisdaypod on Twitter and Instagram. If you have a suggestion for a topic, get in touch. This ...
 
Join historian Lettie Shumate as she examines what history shows us and makes critical connections between the past and present. Lettie’s passion for history and educating about the truth can be heard and felt through her engaging discussions about racism, current events, racial justice, and politics in a time when historical background needs to meet current realities. Her perspective and delivery are unique, direct, and just what you need to hear.
 
The Spear is a podcast from the Modern War Institute at West Point. It aims to explore the combat experience, with each episode featuring a guest who tells a detailed and personal story, describing the events and exploring topics like decision-making under stress and what it feels like to be in combat.
 
Intelligence Squared is the world’s leading forum for debate and intelligent discussion. Live and online we take you to the heart of the issues that matter, in the company of some of the world’s sharpest minds and most exciting orators. Join the debate at www.intelligencesquared.com and download our weekly podcasts every Tuesday and Friday. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared.
 
A history podcast that aims to cover the birth of the European state system by examining the Early Modern Period of European history. Along the way, the podcast will delve into the geography, economy, politics, ideas, and culture of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period to give the listener a view into the lives of the people who lived the events.
 
A history podcast looking at all aspects of WWII, military history, social history, the battles, the campaigns, tanks, gun and other equipment, the politics and those who ran the war. I look at it all. With WW2 slipping from living memory I aim to look at different historical aspects of the Second World War. In each episode of the WWII Podcast I interview an expert on a subject. No topics are out of bounds (as yet), and I cover the military history side of the war as well as looking the home ...
 
EconTalk: Conversations for the Curious is an award-winning weekly podcast hosted by Russ Roberts of Shalem College in Jerusalem. The eclectic guest list includes authors, doctors, psychologists, historians, philosophers, economists, and more. Learn how the health care system really works, the serenity that comes from humility, the challenge of interpreting data, how potato chips are made, what it's like to run an upscale Manhattan restaurant, what caused the 2008 financial crisis, the natur ...
 
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show series
 
Bro History Do You Live Near a Nuclear Sponge? The “Nuclear Sponge” refers to the hundreds of nuclear missiles spread across Colorado, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and Wyoming. These ICBMs, are not meant to be launched, but to “absorb” a nuclear attack and spare major population centers. Today we discuss the logic of the “Nuclear Sponge” policy…
 
In this second episode of the life of Charles V Holy Roman Emperor we continue the story of his reign and of the conflicts in the first half of the 16th Century that shaped Europe and the world. The ruler of an empire is forever in the saddle and so it was with Charles. Conflict began in the year of the Diet of Worms when the French under Francis 1…
 
It’s May 16th. This day in 1948, New York Governor Thomas E Dewey and former Minnesota Governor Harold Stassen were preparing for the first nationally broadcast presidential debate. Jody, NIki, and Kellie discuss Find a transcript of this episode at: https://tinyurl.com/esoterichistory This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Rad…
 
Ska is a music genre that originated in Jamaica in the late 1950s. Ska combined elements of mento and rhythm and blues. It is characterized by accented with stabs on the off-beat. Prince Buster Ska developed in Jamaica in the 1960s with Prince Buster, producers Clement Dodd, and Duke Reid and found its way to England in the early sixties alongside …
 
In the second half of book 3 of the Republic, Plato lays out the controversial theory of mimesis, which states that all art, man-made objects, and cultural products in our environment have profound effects on the health of our souls. With us to help us unpack, analyze, and evaluate Plato’s arguments is, once again, Angie Hobbs, professor of the pub…
 
Everyone remembers the role of Churchill and Roosevelt throughout the war, but there was a third man key to their relationship and of the three of them the only one to remain in power at the end of the war in August 1945. Mackenzie King was the Prime Minister of Canada, the largest British Dominion and America's closest neighbour. By the start of t…
 
Cleaning up at the end of the week and getting ready to turn out the lights. Tonight and we'll talk with our health guest tonight, Victoria Albright of Apex-Water.com. It's a supplement I have used for a while, and since Oxygen (or lack thereof) and pathogens are all the craze these days, I figured it may be an interesting, short conversation to be…
 
In this episode we talk about Salt. And also, what the Romans gave to us. With Monty Python quotes for fun. Show notes will go up asap at englandcast.com/salt You have ONE WEEK LEFT to support the Tudor Planner crowdfunder: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/publishing-the-2022-tudor-planner/x/176575#/ THANK YOU for all your support and listenershi…
 
Trees have memories. They have wisdom. They cooperate in communities of immense complexity, communicating underground through a huge web of fungi, at the centre of which lie the Mother Trees: the mysterious, powerful entities that nurture their kin and sustain the forest. That may sound initially like New Age mumbo-jumbo. But these are the core fin…
 
Episode 115d: 12 Minor Prophets and Greek Names Description: Garry Stevens and I take a look at some of the naming conventions used in the Old Testament of the Bible. Why do certain prophets and characters go by different names? We look at how the Greek Septuagint translation of the Old Testament impacted the way the bible was and is understood. Le…
 
Before Winston Churchill made history, he made news. To a great extent, the news made him too. If it was his own efforts that made him a hero, it was the media that made him a celebrity - and it has been considerably responsible for perpetuating his memory and shaping his reputation in the years since his death. Discussing this topic and much more …
 
When Phillip became Emperor in 244CE, Rome was cracking at the edges. Enemies were at the border, the economy was straining, and the Emperor was an easy target for a disgruntled military. Who wants to rule Rome at this time? Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, …
 
Evidence Missing from Maricopa and a Random Paid at Colonial Pipeline; Lefty Politicians make more medical bribes and ultimatums; the Army goes with the trusty psychotic feminist approach to recruiting new American soldiers; Chile makes strides to protect the autonomy of the human mind from the transhumanist scourge; and Calls and Questions from th…
 
It’s May 13th. This day in 1985, the Philadelphia police department ended a standoff with the MOVE group by dropping two firebombs from a helicopter on a rowhouse, which eventually led to an entire city block burning to the ground and 11 people being killed. Jody, Niki, and Kellie are joined by Philly native Gene Demby of NPR’s “Code Switch” podcas…
 
Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by…
 
Cristina Beltrán has written a thoughtful and interrogating analysis of the concept of citizenship, particularly in the United States, and how the history of the United States as a country has shaped an understanding of who gets to be “belong” as a member of this society. The book, Cruelty as Citizenship: How Migrant Suffering Sustains White Democr…
 
The scene is Turkey in the mid-to-late Seventies. A young male college student hops onto a bus. He sits next to a cute female student from his class, but before they can strike up a conversation, they see a right-wing passenger, walk up to another passenger and hit him on the head with a hammer. The young woman screams. The two students get off the…
 
Over one million Uyghur people have been detained in camps in China, according to estimates, subjected to torture, forced labor, religious restrictions, and even forced sterilization. The vast majority of this minority ethnic group is Muslim, living for centuries at a crossroads of culture and empire along what was once the Silk Road. This week, we…
 
This episode the introducing duties go to DLS co-founders Katy Derbyshire and Florian Duijsens as they hand off to podcast producer and host Susan Stone to present the featured Dead Lady -- Bebe Barron. Known as the "First lady of Electronic Music," Bebe was a classically trained musician who found her joy with husband Louis in the eerie tones made…
 
Our good friend Sean from the S G T report is back on with us tonight to discuss the frantic press toward the global End Game that has been plotted for years. To drive that point home in a freakish, Black Mirror kind of way, we'll end the show picking through what the Canadian Government published on the concept of 'Biodigital Convergence' in early…
 
Another week. Another pack of grubs in the sky. Sometimes in a fight, your fists and feet ain't gonna cut it. You've had a skinful of duty free booze and you remember that you have 32 tiny weapons hidden in your mouth. Three stories of feisty ferals, two dodgy airlines, a dash of ISIS and a lovely English pub. If it's come out of MFB HQ, it's got i…
 
Singer-songwriter Arlo Parks has been nominated for three Brit Awards at just 20 years old. Her inspiration for her debut studio album is drawn from American singer-songwriter Elliott Smith. Matthew Parris and Arlo Parks are joined by Elliott’s friend and former manager of his band Heatmiser, JJ Gonson. They also hear from writer and college profes…
 
In the year leading up the invasion, George W. Bush sketched his justification for the war: good vs. evil, us vs. them. The president wasn’t interested in fleshing out the details beyond that, but lots of other people were. How did intellectuals, on both the right and left, help bolster the Bush administration’s case for war? And how much responsib…
 
John Brown has been called many things: fanatic, hero, terrorist, martyr, zealot. Some of his contemporaries, including Frederick Douglass, believed that were it not for his raid on Harpers Ferry, the Civil War would never have started. But did Brown’s actions really bring about slavery’s eventual downfall? And can his impact still be seen today in…
 
Before the Transatlantic slave trade ravaged the western coast of Africa, immense numbers of persons were taken from their homes and carried across the Black and Mediterranean Seas as involuntary passengers. This trade is the subject of Hannah Barker’s remarkable study, That Most Precious Merchandise: The Mediterranean Trade in Black Sea Slaves, 12…
 
Christine M. Philliou's Turkey: A Past Against History (University of California Press, 2021) challenges conventional understandings about the transition from the Ottoman Empire to Republic of Turkey. From its earliest days, the dominant history of the republic was told as a triumphant narrative of national self-determination and secular democratic…
 
Um retrato original da Bahia no século XIX, num livro cheio de movimento e vozes, sobretudo da gente negra. Em Ganhadores: A Greve Negra de 1857 na Bahia (Companhia das Letras, 2019), o historiador João José Reis reconstitui a história dos negros de ganho, ou ganhadores, protagonistas de uma insólita greve que paralisou o transporte na capital baia…
 
Portrayed in Western discourse as tribal and traditional, Afghans have in fact intensely debated women's rights, democracy, modernity, and Islam as part of their nation building in the post-9/11 era. In Television ad the Afghan Culture Wars: Brought to You by Foreigners, Warlords, and Local Activists (University of Illinois Press, 2020), Wazhmah Os…
 
Swashbuckling tales of valiant gauchos roaming Argentina and Uruguay were nineteenth-century Latin American best sellers. But when these stories jumped from the page to the circus stage and beyond, their cultural, economic, and political influence revolutionized popular culture and daily life. In Staging Frontiers: The Making of Modern Popular Cult…
 
The playwright Anton Chekhov wrote to a friend that he was writing a play with "a great deal of conversation about literature, little actions, tons of love." The Seagull is not unlike our own lives, where there isn't a ready-made plot with a neat ending. This episode is the fourth collaboration between IDEAS and Soulpepper Theatre Company's audio d…
 
We have a short one tonight, but we have plenty to talk about. What is going on with Bill Gates? We know about the announced divorce but why does it seem like he is being set up for a major fall from 'grace'? A little more on the Cyber Attack on the Colonial Pipeline. Then we pop into France where thousands of members of the military have promised …
 
As Gen. Homma, commander of the Japanese forces in The Philippines brings in reinforcements and food, the American Government is finding it all but impossible to resupply Gen. Jonathan Wainwright, the new commander on Corregidor. Meanwhile, MacArthur is still trying to control the defense of Bataan from Australia. Learn more about your ad choices. …
 
Why was the response of the UK and US to the coronavirus pandemic so bungled? How can we be better prepared when the next disaster strikes? These are the questions that historian Niall Ferguson discussed with Rana Mitter in this week's episode. Drawing from his new book 'Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe' he explains that while blaming populists li…
 
Preeminent legal scholar Akhil Reed Amar of Yale Law School, host of the Amarica’s Constitution podcast, joins National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss the big constitutional questions confronted by early Americans, as described in Amar's groundbreaking new book, 'The Words That Made Us: America's Constitutional Conve…
 
“Every time a language dies, it’s like someone just dropped a bomb on the Louvre.” The treasures contained in a human language cannot be overestimated, according to Dr. Daniel Wilson, linguist and language technology pioneer. A research fellow at the University of the Free State, South Africa, and Moscow resident, Daniel has been living in Russia o…
 
It’s May 11th. This day in 1934, a massive dust storm swept across the Great Plains, lifting up millions of tons of topsoil and spreading it as far as 300 miles off the coast of New York City. Jody, Niki, and Kellie discuss the causes of the storm, the way it affected the economy and migration patterns — and the environmental efforts that finally b…
 
It’s a Mother’s Day surprise, complete with tapeworms, smoke bombs, large chunks of earwax, a wall of dead mice, a fly infestation, and of course, Mike’s favorite mother, with a guest appearance by Mike’s favorite dad. Yeah, it’s a weird one.By Mike Rowe, Peggy Rowe, John Rowe, Chuck Klausmeyer
 
Sports fairly practiced—especially individual sports—are a great meritocracy revealing, for all the world to see, the beauty of excellence. In American history, sports have also been an arena for the working out of the great American principle of “liberty to all.” Only by living up to this principle, which is the measure of America, is it possible …
 
There was something about running that just didn’t sit well with ultramarathoner Mike McKnight. Every time he ran a marathon he’d eat to keep his energy up… and every time he ate, he puked. So McKnight decided to cut food from his routine, and as a result, ran 100 miles without stopping. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoice…
 
Hollywood continues to eat itself alive and it never gets any less funny/fascinating; Anthony Fauci moves the "Normal" goalposts back another year; vaccine injections are now available at Dracula's Castle' and has another shot was fired in what has been heralded as the next big event? We'll talk about our weekends, take some calls, and end with som…
 
Philosopher Agnes Callard of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about anger. Is anger something we should vilify and strive to eradicate in ourselves? Or should we accept it as a necessary and appropriate human emotion? Callard takes a fresh look at anger and has much to say about jealousy, desire, and forgiveness as we…
 
Eleni Kefala's book The Conquered: Byzantium and America on the Cusp of Modernity (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021) probes issues of collective memory and cultural trauma in three sorrowful poems composed soon after the conquest of Constantinople and Tenochtitlán. These texts describe the fall of an empire as a fissure in the social fabric and an open wound o…
 
Eleni Kefala's book The Conquered: Byzantium and America on the Cusp of Modernity (Dumbarton Oaks, 2021) probes issues of collective memory and cultural trauma in three sorrowful poems composed soon after the conquest of Constantinople and Tenochtitlán. These texts describe the fall of an empire as a fissure in the social fabric and an open wound o…
 
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