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The MacArthur Memorial produces a podcast on a variety of topics related to the life and times of General Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964). Topics vary and cover subjects related to World War I, World War II, and the Korean War - all designed to give insights into MacArthur's decisions and beliefs. These podcasts also explore the controversies surrounding MacArthur. The MacArthur Memorial is located in Norfolk, VA and is dedicated to preserving and presenting the legacy of General MacArthur and ...
 
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With limited space to tell so many stories, museums always have some very interesting items in storage. The Smithsonian is no different! In this episode, Dr. Frank Blazich, Curator of Military History in the Smithsonian's Division of Political and Military History, shares the story of five very interesting artifacts, currently in storage at the Nat…
 
Dr. William H. Bartsch is one of the great historians of the Pacific War. He holds a PhD in Economics and Middle Eastern Studies, and he worked for the UN for a number of years, all over the world. As he worked, he also indulged his passion for Pacific War history and spent years gathering source materials that form the basis of several seminal wor…
 
During World War I, Marguerite Harrison became the first female foreign intelligence agent employed by US military intelligence. While relatively unknown today, she played a major role in normalizing the idea of a woman working in American intelligence. She also had an interesting career that took her from Germany during the Versailles Conference, …
 
It’s been called the textbook operation of World War II. It was the greatest prison rescue ever; over 2000 prisoners of war liberated and not one them or their liberators killed. Unbelievably, the liberation of Los Baños prison camp by the 511th Parachute Regiment and Hunter’s Philippine Guerrillas went largely unheralded. To share the story of thi…
 
In 1918, armies on both sides of WWI were stricken by the Spanish Flu. Douglas MacArthur suffered a period of illness during this period that was unrelated to his bouts with mustard gas. Did he contract the Spanish Flu? In this latest episode, Jim Zobel and Amanda Williams of the MacArthur Memorial briefly discuss MacArthur’s illness and the impact…
 
From the Schlieffen Plan to Verdun, the critical years of 1914-1916 set the stage for major upheavals in 1917. For expert analysis of this period, we sat down with Dr. Michael Neiberg, author of Fighting the Great War and Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I, to discuss the strategy and major events of the Western Front and h…
 
From 1919 to 1941, Clark Field in the Philippines was home to American air power in the western part of the Pacific. Attacked by the Japanese at the start of the war and then abandoned in the retreat to Bataan, the airfield was taken over by Japanese troops before being recaptured in 1945. To explore the development and history of Clark Field, we s…
 
By the end of 1916, the Allied and Central powers were exhausted and were facing serious political, economic and social problems. For Russia, a country already struggling with the structural problems of autocracy, the troubles of 1916 led to revolution. To learn more about the timeline and particulars of the Russian Revolution, we had a conversatio…
 
Many small countries entered World War I with the hope of gaining some sort of advantage in the post-war period. Most of these countries did not contribute troops or any other substantial aid to the combatants. Siam is a notable exception. To learn more about Siam's participation in World War I, we spoke with Dr. Stefan Hell, author of the book Sia…
 
While radio and telephone were becoming more and more a part of the battlefield, these communication technologies also had weaknesses on the World War I battlefield. A secure, reliable, low tech communication option was needed. Armies on both sides turned to Homing Pigeons to provide this vital link. We sat down with Dr. Frank Blazich, Curator of M…
 
America’s path to World War I was complicated and involved some deep cultural shifts. What changes drove the evolution from neutrality to war? What role did immigrant and minority groups play in this shift? And, did the American people go into this war naïve to the costs? To answer some of these questions, we sat down with Dr. Michael Nieberg to di…
 
General Arthur MacArthur, the father of Douglas MacArthur, traveled to the Philippines in the summer of 1898 and took part in one of the most interesting battles of the Spanish-American War – the land Battle of Manila. The American victory there began the transition of the Philippines from a Spanish colony to an American territory, and ultimately s…
 
World War I had profound social and economic consequences. American industry had typically relied upon European immigrant labor. When the war disrupted immigration, American industry turned to other sources of labor and began recruiting African Americans. Responding to these new economic opportunities, large numbers of African Americans began leavi…
 
History has always been a regular and dependable muse for Hollywood. However, there is always tension between "real" history and "reel" history. The Battle of Midway is an excellent example of this tension and how Hollywood's take on history is influenced by contemporary events and social issues. Recently, we sat down with Dr. Tim Orr to discuss th…
 
Like the other Great Powers, Russia experienced a great deal of turmoil in the decades leading up to World War I. Slow industrialization, military failure in the Russo-Japanese War, and mass social unrest were just some of the problems that were further compounded by weak leadership and a fragile political system. In this latest episode, Dr. Collee…
 
Who was Vicente Lim? Dr. Richard Meixsel, author of the book Frustrated Ambition: General Vicente Lim and the Philippine Military Experience, 1910–1944, answers this question with a brief exploration of Lim's life and times. The first Filipino to graduate from West Point, Lim’s military career spanned more than three decades. Although disappointed …
 
At 2:22 p.m. EST on December 7, 1941, Franklin Roosevelt’s Press Secretary, Stephen Early, announced to the press pool: "The Japanese have attacked Pearl Harbor from the air and all naval and military activities on the island of Oahu, principal American base in the Hawaiian islands." Within minutes, millions of Americans were informed of the attack…
 
Appointed Supreme Allied Commander during World War I, Ferdinand Foch is regarded as the architect of the 1918 victory. He is also recognized as one of the most original thinkers in the 20th century French military. In this episode, Dr. Michael Neiberg discusses Foch's unusual career path, outlines his World War I service, and highlights his unique…
 
Arriving in Paris in 1919 for the Peace Conference, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson made it clear that he believed Italy entered World War I in a Machiavellian spirit of “cold-blooded calculation.” Italy’s leaders disagreed – arguing that their participation in the war was about liberation and self-determination. Regardless of the argument, like most…
 
The American Civil War was an immediate and formative experience for General MacArthur’s parents and their families. General MacArthur even referred to himself as the “reunion of blue and gray personified.” In this special lecture, historian Dan Welch tells the story of a MacArthur relative, William J. Hardy, who fought with the 1st Richmond Howitz…
 
General MacArthur was a voracious reader. Prior to World War II, he owned thousands of books. He had to leave this library behind when he escaped to Corregidor during the Japanese conquest of the Philippines. Sadly, most of the library was destroyed or looted by the end of World War II. Despite this loss, through gifts and purchases, he was able to…
 
Author Ann Todd discusses her book OSS Operation Black Mail - the story of Elizabeth "Betty" P. McIntosh, who spent eighteen months serving in the Office of Strategic Services in what has been called the "forgotten theater," China-Burma-India. Her craft was black propaganda, and her mission was to demoralize the Japanese through prevarication and d…
 
In this interview, Dr. Sanders Marble, Senior Historian of the U.S. Army Medical Department Office of Medical History, discusses how the U.S. Army worked with the medical community and the Red Cross to prepare for and confront the crisis of World War I. Faced with new clinical practices and diagnoses, U.S. Army medical professionals worked hard to …
 
In 1948, Sibyl Kathigasu became the only Malaysian woman to receive the George Medal for gallantry, the highest civilian honor given by King George VI. Why did she receive such an honor? During World War II she actively resisted the Japanese occupation of what was then British Malaya. As a trained nurse, she provided medical care for members of the…
 
In May 2018, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Symposium that focused on how the experience of World War I shaped many of America's World War II Leaders. Mike Miller, Emeritus head of the Marine Corps History Division, discussed the USMC and how Harry S. Truman’s service in the U.S. Army during World War I forever influenced his opinion o…
 
In May 2018, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Symposium that focused on how the experience of World War I shaped many of America's World War II Leaders. Jeffery Kozak, Director of Library and Archives at the George C. Marshall Foundation, discussed George C. Marshall’s service in World War I and how this experience taught him to navigate…
 
In May 2018, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Symposium that focused on how the experience of World War I shaped many of America's World War II Leaders. James Zobel, the MacArthur Memorial archivist, explored Douglas MacArthur's service in World War I and how this experience played a role in everything from his reforms at West Point to h…
 
In May 2018, the MacArthur Memorial hosted a World War I Symposium that focused on how the experience of World War I shaped many of America’s World War II leaders. Dr. Keith Dickson, a professor at the Joint Forces Staff College, discussed Dwight D. Eisenhower’s World War I service and how it prepared him to understand the value and the psyche of t…
 
In April 2018, the Memorial hosted a talk by Dr. Frank A. Blazich, Curator of Modern Military History at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and editor of Colonel David L. Hardee's memoir Bataan Survivor: A POW's Account of Japanese Captivity in World War II. Dr. Blazich gave a fascinating talk about Col. Hardee's POW experience.…
 
In July 1918, Germany embarked on its final offensive of the war. This offensive called for a massive push across the old battlefields of the Champagne to the east and west of Reims in order to seize the rail center of Chalons sur Marne and cut off the French armies defending Paris and Verdun. French General Henri Gouraud's IV Army was responsible …
 
In August 1914, as decade-old diplomatic crises erupted into war on the European continent, a group of American citizens, in defiance of US President Woodrow Wilson’s declaration of neutrality, volunteered for French military service. Of those Americans who volunteered during neutrality, thirty-eight uniquely distinguished themselves not as ambulan…
 
The Korean War always generates a lot of questions. Did MacArthur really want to use nukes? Did China make use of valuable intelligence from the Cambridge Five? Were Russian pilots engaging American planes on the Yalu River? Why was the air war in Korea so restricted? Or was it? To discuss these questions, the MacArthur Memorial staff sat down with…
 
Ned Almond is regarded as one of the more controversial American generals of World War II and the Korean War. While most historians agree that Almond was talented and had a distinguished combat record, he also openly espoused the idea that black soldiers were less capable than white soldiers. This overt racism has dominated scholarship of his life,…
 
1942 was an eventful year for the United States military. To mark some of the interesting and important events that happened that year, the MacArthur Memorial and the Hampton Roads Naval Museum hosted a 1942" symposium in October 2017. At the symposium, Pete Bulkeley, son of the skipper of PT-41, discussed his father's role in MacArthur's escape fr…
 
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