Medicine public
[search 0]
Best Medicine Podcasts We Could Find
Best Medicine Podcasts We Could Find
Learn about Medicine through podcasts on how different diseases are tackled in modern society, engage with modern research, discover interviews from medical professionals, insights into new drugs, discussions, medical news, and podcasts at the epicenter of the medicine universe.
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
We trust doctors with our lives; they are some of the most educated and well-respected members of society. But what happens if they can't diagnose a patient? This high stake medical procedural follows patients as they suffer from bizarre, often terrifying illnesses. None of which doctors learned about in medical school. Medical Mysteries is a Parcast Original, with new episodes every Tuesday.
 
This podcast might not actually kill you, but it covers so many things that can. Each episode tackles a different disease, from its history, to its biology, and finally, how scared you need to be. Ecologists and epidemiologists Erin Welsh and Erin Allmann Updyke make infectious diseases acceptable fodder for dinner party conversation and provide the perfect cocktail recipe to match
 
The purpose of this podcast is to help medical students crush their emergency medicine clerkship and get top 1/3 on their SLOE. The content is organized in an approach to format and covers different chief complaints, critical diagnoses, and skills important for your clerkship.
 
Supercharge your learning and enhance your practice with this Internal Medicine Podcast featuring board certified Internists as they interview the experts to bring you clinical pearls, practice changing knowledge and bad puns. Doctors Matthew Watto, Stuart Brigham, Paul Williams and friends (a national network of students, residents and clinician educators) deliver a little knowledge food for your brain hole. Yummy! No boring lectures here, just high value content and a healthy dose of humor ...
 
We believe in the educational merits of Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM), which includes podcasts, blogs, articles on PubMed Central, conferences streamed for free and more. As a result, we would like to encourage others to move beyond quoting podcasts and into the realm of tying “cutting edge” FOAM to the core content. We’ll provide some review and references for listeners to go read. Why, indeed, should we FOAM it alone when FOAM can inspire us to go, read, think, and be excellent?
 
The BMJ is an international peer reviewed medical journal and a fully “online first” publication. The BMJ’s vision is to be the world’s most influential and widely read medical journal. Our mission is to lead the debate on health and to engage, inform, and stimulate doctors, researchers, and other health professionals in ways that will improve outcomes for patients. We aim to help doctors to make better decisions.
 
A UK Prehospital Emergency Medicine Podcast. This podcast and associated website aims to: - Share knowledge and expertise in the field of prehospital medicine with specific reference to the UK working environment - Make this content relevant to all professional prehospital practitioners
 
Our near daily podcasts move quickly to reflect current events, are inspired by real patient care, and speak to the true nature of what it’s like to work in the Emergency Room or Pre-Hospital Setting. Each medical minute is recorded in a real emergency department, by the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist on duty – the ER is our studio and everything is live.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Never has the spotlight been as strong on a clinical trial as that on the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine, the first approved for covid-19. In this interview, Joanne Silberner spoke to its lead principal investigator, Stephen Thomas chief of infectious diseases at SUNY Upstate Medical University, New York, became the lead principal investigator for one of …
 
This week's guest, James Geering, author, paramedic, firefighter and stuntman, is the next in our unofficial author series. His book "One More Light: Life, Death and Humanity Through the Eyes of a Firefighter" tells the unique stories of saving lives and the impact those experiences have on him both physically and mentally. He discusses the failure…
 
A painless walk through the diagnosis and management of peripheral artery disease (PAD). PAD is one of those diagnoses that you know about, but maybe don’t feel comfortable diagnosing and managing. Listen as our esteemed guest Dr. Vladimir Lakhter @VladLakhter (Temple Health) talks us through its diagnosis and management. Dr. Lakhter gives us a str…
 
We discuss EM presentation, diagnosis, and management of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Hosts: Mark Iscoe, MD Brian Gilberti, MD Bree Tse, MD https://media.blubrry.com/coreem/content.blubrry.com/coreem/SAH.mp3 Download Leave a Comment Tags: Critical Care, Neurology, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Show Notes Non-contrast head CT showing SAH (Case courtesy of Dr.…
 
In this episode, we review new registry data from the ACIP meeting on pregnant people who received an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine and discuss, in general, what we know about the COVID-19 vaccines in pregnancy. Show notes: FOAMcast.org Pregnancy Decision Aid Thanks for listening! Lauren Westafer and Jeremy Faust…
 
New Strongman Template: https://www.barbellmedicine.com/shop/training-templates/strongman-template/ New Apparel: https://www.barbellmedicine.com/shop/apparel/ For more of our stuff:Podcasts: goo.gl/X4H4z8Website:www.barbellmedicine.comInstagram:@austin_barbellmedicine@jordan_barbellmedicine@leah_barbellmedicine@vaness_barbellmedicine@untamedstrengt…
 
Date: February 18th, 2021 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Chris Bond is an emergency medicine physician and assistant Professor at the University of Calgary. He is also an avid FOAM supporter/producer through various online outlets including TheSGEM. Reference: Brichko et al. Rapid Administration of Methoxyflurane to Patients in the Emergency Department (RAMPED…
 
Royal jelly, honey, propolis, pollen…the list of bee products that many of use from day to day is long. But fewer people are aware that there’s something less tangible yet just as healing about bees: their energy. Press play to step into the medicinal world of bees and learn: Why and how one teaspoon of honey per day can prolong your life How bees …
 
In a disaster, especially a long-term one, the family medic has to be able to handle a lot of different emergencies. Some of these are clearly survivable, such as a broken finger, and some are not, like a bullet to the brain. It’s important for the medic to have a realistic attitude towards the hard facts. Being realistic won’t make decision-making…
 
https://clinicalproblemsolving.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/ARM-EP-6-Manning-Corbie-Smith-FINAL-2_19_21-8.53-PM.mp3 In Episode 6 of the Antiracism in Medicine series, “Racism, Trustworthiness, and the #COVID19 vaccine,” we are joined by two forces in the field of health equity and academic medicine, Dr. Giselle Corbie-Smith and Dr. Kimberly Manni…
 
Anand Swaminathan on LAST prevention, recognition and management, Emily Austin on sodium nitrite suicide kit poisoning, methemoglobinemia and methylene blue, Hans & Erin Rosenberg on post-intubation analgesia and sedation, Salim Rezaie on short-term tetracaine for corneal abrasions new evidence, Jesse MacLaren on differentiating ST deviation in occ…
 
This podcast presents an approach to infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS). It reviews a case presentation and general overview of risks, symptoms, consequences, and management. Created by MD students Christine Miller and Sarah Marvin, with the help of Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Dr. Chantel Courville, all from the Northern Ontario S…
 
Never has the spotlight been as strong on a clinical trial as that on the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine, the first approved for covid-19. In this interview, Joanne Silberner spoke to its lead principal investigator, Stephen Thomas chief of infectious diseases at SUNY Upstate Medical University, New York, became the lead principal investigator for one of …
 
Could a multi-state blackout lasting months be in our near future? Could the experience of Texans become the experience of US citizens all over the country? And is that all it would take for the US to quickly revert to the status of a third world country? Tune in to learn: Why wind power does not actually have a low carbon footprint, and how its us…
 
Neanderthals unfairly dissed after new findings prove they were capable of language and speech; Stone Agers' brains were bigger than ours; The B vitamin that might forestall COVID-19 cytokine storm; Beets vs. hypertension; Do isolated bouts of “white coat” hypertension necessitate meds? Can low white blood cell counts after chemo be restored? High …
 
In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Dr. Olga Novikova to discuss the conservative management of endometrial cancer. Highlights1) Levonorgestrel-releasing IUD containing regimens are found superior to oral medroxyprogesterone in both atypical hyperplasia and early endometrial cancer patients.2) ART wh…
 
Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD Educational Pearls: When evaluating a thunderclap headache, don’t forget RCVS! RCVS: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome Due to reversible spasms of cerebral blood vessels Can sometimes be seen on CTA or MRA, but often the imaging is normal and formal angiograms only occasionally show it It can be caused by m…
 
Jim Adams, MD is direct, transparent, and unapologetic in his ‘tough love’ management strategy. In this episode, Jim breaks down: how setting expectations early helps to manage complaints later, managing those who degrade social capital, redirecting conflict to mutual benefit, and how understanding what motivates others’ behavior keeps you from tak…
 
Host: Azeem Latif, MD Guest: Sarah Kohnstamm, MD, FACC New guidelines on valvular heart disease from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have recently been published. In this activity, Dr. Latib and Dr. Kohnstamm discuss the etiology of aortic stenosis, as well as apply the new ACC/AHA guidelines to clinical practi…
 
Rita Colwell is one of the top scientists in America: the groundbreaking microbiologist who discovered how cholera survives between epidemics and the former head of the National Science Foundation. She joins us for International Women’s Day, discussing the trials and successes of being a woman in science and her new book A Lab of One’s Own.Read the…
 
Have you ever been told you have high blood pressure? Were you surprised? Did you feel completely fine, and even doubt that the numbers were accurate? If so, you’re not alone. Most people have no idea that they’re hypertensive, because it can takes years if not decades for this disease to cause havoc in the body. Press play to discover: Why routine…
 
Is it possible to prevent cancer with metabolic therapies used to increase mitochondrial health? Could it also be possible to treat even very aggressive cancers with the same approach? Tune in for the answers, and to discover: What the Warburg effect is, and the difference between oxidative phosphorylation and fermentation in the development of can…
 
We realized the other day that we have yet to do a podcast on diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In this episode, we spend a little bit of time talking about the pathophysiology, but the majority is focused on the logistics of running a DKA transfer. Here are the highlights: DO EVERYTHING YOU CAN TO AVOID STOPPING THE INSULIN. DO EVERYTHING YOU CAN TO AV…
 
Background: Epistaxis is a common Emergency Department (ED) complaint with over 450,000 visits per year and a lifetime incidence of 60% (Gifford 2008, Pallin 2005). Standard anterior epistaxis treatment consists of holding pressure, use of local vasoconstrictors, topical application of silver nitrate and placement of an anterior nasal pack. ED pati…
 
For the first time, chemistry can be observed in real-time. Turn a magnetic field off, watch cellular fluorescence dim; turn the magnetic field back on, and watch the cellular fluorescence get brighter. Tune in to learn more from the lead researcher, including: A likely explanation for how some animals use magnetic fields for navigation Why all cel…
 
Dr. Samantha Montano We invited Dr. Samantha Montano, a climate and emergency management expert and author of the book, Disasterology, on the show. Her educational background includes a B.S. in Psychology from Loyola University New Orleans and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Emergency Management from North Dakota State University. She is currently an assistan…
 
In this podcast, we talk to Professor Peter Brennan, surgical human factors expert, and Mr Jon Lund, Chair of the Joint Committee on Surgical Training, about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical training and innovative approaches to mitigating its effects as well as how training is anticipated to recover.Subscribe to the BMJ Military Hea…
 
Joining us on this podcast to discuss this crucial topic are Dr Adam Gledhill, Dr Dale Forsdyke and Tom Goom.Adam is Course Director for Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences at Leeds Beckett University. He is also chair of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Science Division of Psychology.Dale is a Senior Lecturer in Sports Injury Manageme…
 
On this episode, I discuss cyclosporine pharmacology. This medication is an immunosuppressant used to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Cyclosporine has a long list of potential adverse effects such as hyperglycemia, renal impairment, GI toxicity, and hypertriglyceridemia. Important monitoring parameters for cyclosporine include drug levels,…
 
When it comes to radiation therapy for cancer, cellular resistance to it can be a death sentence. What is the genetic basis for this resistance in humans? And what on earth do zebrafish have to do with it? Well…a lot. Tune in to learn: Why it’s nearly impossible to conduct unbiased research on mice and other mammals How zebrafish are helping resear…
 
In this exciting podcast, Dr. Randolph Nesse, a pioneer in evolutionary psychiatry, discusses his new book "Good Reasons for Bad Feelings." Nature doesn’t care whether we feel bad—our emotions are shaped by natural selection to maximize the survival of the species. But there’s a mismatch between our ancient emotional wiring and the circumstances of…
 
In this episode of the JISAKOS Podcast, Social Media Editors, Dr. Emmanouil Brilakis and Prof. Andreas Voss interview Prof. Margaret W. Fok of the Queen Mary Hospital in Hong Kong about her recently published article, "Endoscopic cubital tunnel decompression: state of the art" (https://jisakos.bmj.com/content/early/2021/01/31/jisakos-2020-000506).…
 
Tech CEO Steve Kirsch joins the show to talk about his bout with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, a rare blood cancer that he was diagnosed with in 2007 and how he has been fighting back. They also discuss Steve's recent work to help the fight against Covid-19. Learn more about Steve Kirsch by following him on Twitter @STKirschVisit Celltrient.com …
 
In this month’s podcast, Rod McLure talks to Professor Richard Matzopoulos, about his work as a researcher-practitioner working across government and academia in South Africa. He details his data-driven policy work to support an evidence-based approach to large impact upstream nation-level interventions.Richard Matzopoulos is a Chief Specialist Sci…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login