show episodes
 
I'm Cullen Burke, and this is Cauldron - A Military History Podcast. I'll cover the significant battles in history, breaking down the vital players, weapons, methods, events, and outcomes. Let’s take a peek into the past and see what, if anything, can be learned from the most dramatic moments in our collective story. Let’s get stuck in!
 
Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. For further reading suggestions, information about our hosts, our complete episode archive, and more visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
Enchanted: The History of Magic & Witchcraft features the best stories from the history of magic, sorcery, alchemy, and witchcraft. With in-depth historical research accompanied by dramatic storytelling and ambient sound, it's the perfect listening experience for fans of stormy nights, cozy blankets, and steaming cups of tea. New episodes on the first Friday of every month.
 
From long-lost Viking ships to kings buried in unexpected places; from murders and power politics, to myths, religion, the lives of ordinary people: Gone Medieval is History Hit’s podcast dedicated to the middle ages, in Europe and far beyond. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Mythgard Academy aims to make engaging discussions of fantasy and science fiction literature free and open to everyone. The Mythgard Academy program features live discussions with Dr. Corey Olsen, The Tolkien Professor, and other experts on speculative fiction. Books are nominated and voted on by our supporters, and recordings are available for free via podcast and the Signum University YouTube channel.
 
In Viking times, a ‘Thing’ was a gathering; a place where leaders and warriors could meet and talk. In the 21st century, our ‘Thing’ is a virtual place where history academics and enthusiasts from around the world can come together to share knowledge. Join Miranda and Lucas each episode as they delve into another fascinating topic about Vikings, archaeology, and more!
 
N
Noble Blood

1
Noble Blood

iHeartPodcasts and Grim & Mild

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Author Dana Schwartz explores the stories of some of history’s most fascinating royals: the tyrants and the tragic, the murderers and the murdered, and everyone in between. Because when you’re wearing a crown, mistakes often mean blood.
 
For many episodes to come, we'll be exploring the rich history of Poland. From it's humble beginnings, we'll follow the people of Poland as they form their own unique cultural identity, rise into a great European power, cross paths with the Mongol Horde, save Europe from an Ottoman invasion, and do their best to keep their independence firm from one generation to the next.
 
Voted “Favorite Political Podcast” by Apple Podcasts listeners. Stephen Colbert says "Everybody should listen to the Slate Political Gabfest." The Gabfest, featuring Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz, is the kind of informal and irreverent discussion Washington journalists have after hours over drinks.
 
1
1 Scot 1 Not

1
1 Scot 1 Not

Karen Campbell & Lucy Brydon

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Friends Lucy Brydon (the Scottish one) and Karen Campbell (the Not Scottish one) chat about all things Scotland in this weekly chat. From haunted castles and spooky stone circles to fairy lore and mythical creatures galore (and more!) join us with your wee dram and sense of humor each week as we kick back, relax and tell a Scottish tale or two with YOU! For uncut video versions, artwork by Karen & Lucy and more visit 1scot1not.com. Connect with us on Instagram & Twitter @1scot1not
 
Welcome to The Medieval World Podcast, where we explore fun and interesting pieces of medieval history. Each Friday, I publish a new episode. In addition to episodes, check out my lectures below. If there's an episode or series you would like to see, let me know via email at themedievalworldpodcast@gmail.com. Also, you can follow me on twitter at: https://twitter.com/wjb_mattingly . I am also starting to create videos of my lectures at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxmN86fC3uYC9JW-hKV4Z1w.
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Early medieval royals ate mostly meat, right? Wrong! A new study that’s made headlines around the world has shown that medieval kings were largely vegetarian! To help shed light on this exciting new discovery, today Cat is joined by Dr Sam Leggett of the University of Edinburgh, a bio-archaeologist and the lead author of the study. For more Gone Me…
 
To many the city might seem simply a large urban area to live within, but it actually forms an important political concept and community that has been influential throughout European history. From the polis of Ancient Greece, to the Roman Republic, to the city-states of the Italian Renaissance, and down to the present day. Modern concepts of democr…
 
Sarah and guest Miti von Weissenberg explore sanctity and voluntary poverty in 1989 film Francesco! Join us as we delve into the real lives of St. Francis and St. Clare of Assisi, the intertwined histories of the Franciscans and the Poor Clares, and the link between biopic and hagiography. Learn more about Miti’s research and teaching: https://www.…
 
What was it like to grow up in the Middle Ages? In our latest Everything you wanted to know episode, Dr Emily Joan Ward answers your questions about medieval childhood. Speaking to Dave Musgrove, she discusses topics including education, how children were put to work, and what they did for fun. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informat…
 
We continue the Abd al-Latif series and dig into his observations on Egypt. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, and I have some things on Redbubble. Sources: Abd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī. A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Jou…
 
We want to play a game. This week, Dana Schwartz stuffs us in an iron maiden and explains why the most famous Medieval torture devices are none of the above. Digressions include the Kings Cross Wax Museum, getting stabbed in the butt, and the pivot to video era. Links to stuff discussed within: 5 Of The Most Gruesome Medieval Torture Devices [Buzzf…
 
Journalist Philip Oltermann explores the unusual story of the poetry group run by the East German Ministry for State Security. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explains why the Stasi decided to employ rhyme and verse in their battle against capitalism. (Ad) Philip Oltermann is the author of The Stasi Poetry Circle (Faber & Faber, 2022). Buy it now from Wa…
 
Franz Ferdinand (the Archduke, not the band) is a central figure in the history of Europe, known the world over for being the target of the assassination that ignited World War I. But before his death, he was a shy, reluctant and awkward boy who was never meant to be the heir to an Empire, who fell in love with a woman he wasn't allowed to marry. S…
 
"I had scarcely finished speaking when the enemy's battery opened fire upon us, and raked us through and through. They concentrated their fire upon us, and with their first discharge carried off Count de la Bastide, the lieutenant of my own company with whom at the moment I was speaking, and twelve grenadiers, who fell side by side in the ranks, so…
 
Nicholas Orme speaks to Emily Briffett about the long story of English cathedrals, tracing their role in society from their beginnings in the early Middle Ages to the modern day. Nicholas reveals how cathedrals have survived the turbulence of religious and social change, and explores what they can reveal to us about our history. See acast.com/priva…
 
King Harold Godwinson of England would see his country invaded by army led by his brother Tostig and King Harald Hardrada of Norway. In this episode of Bow and Blade, Kelly and Michael discuss the Norwegian invasion of 1066, which culminated at the Battle of Stamford Bridge. Support this podcast on Patreon - go to https://www.patreon.com/medievalis…
 
How did the Restoration of the monarchy come about, after a period of civil war and 11 years of Republican rule? How smooth was the transfer of power? And what did it mean for the everyday person? Speaking with Elinor Evans, Dr Clare Jackson tackles listener questions and popular internet search queries on Charles II’s ascension to the throne, in t…
 
In this podcast: 1. Steve Eulberg, 2. Fiddle Whamdiddle, 3. Olexa Kabanov, 4. Steve Eulberg, 5. Steve Eulberg, 6. Steve Eulberg, 7. Yumi Kurosawa, 8. Olexa Kabanov, 9. Steve Eulberg, 10. Daughters of Elvin, 11. Steve Eulberg, 12. Daughters of Elvin, 13. Steve Eulberg, 14. Steve Eulberg, 15. Steve Eulberg…
 
Enjoying our new Black Death series? Listen to the next three episodes right now on our new subscription podcast channel HistoryExtra Plus, along with early access to our new series on the end of Roman Britain. Follow the link below to sign up now: https://apple.co/3w0aaXz See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Part one of this comprehensive trilogy covering the Wars of the Roses left the Yorkist lords attained and in exile. From this point, the 15th century civil wars were transformed into a bitter procession of dynastic clashes between the rival houses of Lancaster and York - the result of which would reforge England's destiny for centuries to come. In …
 
Today we finish with Martin Luther, the man credited with beginning the Reformation. Luther's final years are filled with increasingly angry battles with everyone from the Anabaptists to the Pope in Rome and, lastly, with Europe's Jewish population. Visit our website for more content: www.westerncivpodcast.com Become a Patron to support the show an…
 
From voting scandals and political messaging to drag queens and ABBA, Dr Dean Vuletic speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the history of the Eurovision Song Contest. He discusses some of the controversies in the competition’s past and reveals what it can tell us about the changing face of Europe over the last six decades. (Ad) Dean Vuletic is the autho…
 
Thousands of artefacts were uncovered during the Coppergate Dig, and hundreds of those are on display in the gallery at the JORVIK Viking Centre. Join Lucas and Miranda as they talk about the first case in the gallery, all about Travel and Trade in Jorvik, and as they draw your attention to what you might have missed at first glance. This episode i…
 
Here are some notes and references from this week’s show: Michael C. Dorf for Dorf on Law: “In a Post-Roe World, Can States Prevent Women From Seeking Abortions Out-of-State?” Ruth Graham for The New York Times: “A Pastor and His Congregation Part Ways” Ruth Graham and Elizabeth Dias for The New York Times: “The Growing Religious Fervor in the Amer…
 
What would it have been like to live through a Black Death outbreak? In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Samuel Cohn about the experiences of medieval people in communities ravaged by the deadly disease. He reveals what the chroniclers tell us about the range of responses to the crisis in the late 1340s, and the lengths people went…
 
Analyzing the spread and survival of Islamic legal ideas and commentaries in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean littorals, Islamic Law in Circulation: Shafi'i Texts across the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean (Cambridge University Press, 2022) focuses on Shāfiʿīsm, one of the four Sunnī schools of Islamic law. It explores how certain …
 
Music formed the early Christians in faith. It catechized them. Inspired them. Unified them. Healed them. The Fathers — from Ignatius of Antioch to John of Damascus — testify to this fact. Many of them wrote music. Augustine wrote a book about music. At a time when most people could not read, music was the most effective delivery system for doctrin…
 
Jacob Mchangama explores the global history of free speech, discussing its ancient origins, staunchest defenders and biggest critics. Speaking to Matt Elton, he also reveals the ways the right to speak freely has been threatened at moments of social upheaval. (Ad) Jacob Mchangama is the author of Free Speech: A Global History from Socrates to Socia…
 
"Gawain gripped his axe and gathered it on high, Advanced the left foot before him on the ground, And slashed swiftly down on the exposed part, So that the sharp blade sheared through, shattering the bones, Sank deep in the sleek flesh, split it in two, And the scintillating steel struck the ground." Thank you for checking out our podcast. Be sure …
 
Phillipa Vincent-Connolly explores the lives of disabled people in the Tudor era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she uncovers complex attitudes to disability in the period, and reveals how some disabled figures played key roles at the royal court. (Ad) Phillipa Vincent-Connolly is the author of the Disability and the Tudors: All the King's Fools (Pen…
 
Margery Kempe: mystic, autobiographer…schizophrenic? In honour of Mental Health Awareness week, Dr Cat Jarman is joined by Dr Alison Torn from Leeds Trinity University to explore the complicated legacy of a woman who is credited as both the first English autobiographer, and case of schizophrenia. However, how appropriate is it to view Kempe’s life …
 
This week we begin our journey into the totally true not at all made up diary that has been scaring America’s teens for fifty years. Digressions include Jell-O, magic mushrooms, and ironing your hair, and Sarah promises to trip with Carmen. “Button, Button” is by Richard Matheson. Here's where to find Carmen: Website Support us: Bonus Episodes on P…
 
In September 1519, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan set off on a fateful voyage to find a route to the Spice Islands. In the centuries since, Magellan has gone down in history as a chivalric adventurer, his name forever linked to the first circumnavigation of the globe. But, as Professor Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells Ellie Cawthorne, Magella…
 
What are the origins of aircraft being used in war? How common were dogfights? And were early fighter pilots really the ‘knights of the air’? Speaking with Emily Briffett, Paul Beaver answers your top questions about military aviation in our latest Everything you wanted to know episode. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
(Lucy) ​Ambitious, resilient, and internationally famous, Anna May Wong was one of the biggest movie stars of the 1930s. She had her first starring role in Hollywood before she was 20. She had also left Hollywood twice by the time she was 30, frustrated by the racism she faced as a Chinese-American woman. Throughout her career, she had to fight rac…
 
The Wars of the Roses is a complex and fascinating period of English history that dominates the second half of the 15th century and leads to the rise of the Tudor dynasty. It’s often characterised as a dynastic struggle between Lancaster and York, but it was much more than that. In this first part of three special episodes, Matt Lewis details the o…
 
While Martin Luther thought his reformation was about theology and humankind's relationship to God, many people felt it was about a great deal more. The peasants of Germany, for example, heard Luther's words and thought this meant the time was right for REAL change on earth, not in heaven, but here in Germany and right now. Luther sides with the pr…
 
The might of the Tudor dynasty was built on the blood and sweat of three generations of another family – the Dudleys. And sometimes, they paid the ultimate price. Rhiannon Davies speaks to Joanne Paul about the members of the family who were key players in the Tudor era, from Edmund Dudley’s efforts to raise taxes for Henry VII to Robert Dudley’s f…
 
Let's face it: most of the time, witches get a bad rap. Some witches, however, are famous gift-givers, protectors, healers, and liberators. In this episode, you'll travel from the first century to the twenty-first and meet La Befana, Arima, Aradia, and many of the other good witches of Italy. Who doesn't need a bit of magic now and again? Researche…
 
" I road one of these in Japan at night, and it was so much fun." In this episode, I discuss Rollercoaster Tycoon 3, the early history of rollercoasters, and how much I love riding them. Sources mentioned in the episode Silverman, Stephen M. 2019. The Amusement Park: 900 Years of Thrills and Spills, and the Dreamers and Schemers Who Built Them. Ill…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login