show episodes
 
How Fear Changed America. Homeland Insecurity is a new documentary podcast from RAICES that chronicles the untold story of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). We go back to the beginning, when our government built a powerful new agency in the wake of 9/11 to protect America from terrorists—only to use that agency to terrorize immigrants. From family separation to federal agents deployed in Portland, the scope and cruelty of DHS continues to expand, begging the question: Is anyone safe ...
 
“Who Is My Neighbour?” is a podcast by You Belong Australia. Each episode you’ll join with Sorgul & Warren to meet some of Australia’s newest neighbours; You’ll hear their stories, listen to their hopes and dreams, and discover the incredible courage and inspiration they bring to our communities and richly diverse Australian culture. You’ll also learn from some more established Aussies too and the joy they’ve found living and working alongside our refugee & migrant background neighbours.
 
Solidarity Is This is a podcast created and hosted by Deepa Iyer, Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Building Movement Project where she runs Solidarity Is, a multi-strategy program to deepen transformative solidarity practices, models, narratives, and ideas. On the podcast, we explore how individuals and institutions are experimenting with cross-racial and cross-movement solidarity in America’s changing racial landscape. Learn more at www.solidarityis.org
 
Migration Conversations is a podcast that invites persons to share their migration stories. Hosted by Professor Jamie Liew, each episode is an in-depth conversation with people who have experienced the Canadian immigration system or other migration regimes up close. We talk to migrants, immigrants, lawyers, policy makers, advocates and experts. We hope that these conversations shed light on the challenges migrants face through their own voices. Please note this podcast is not legal advice.
 
How can we all help shape better policies for better lives? OECD Podcasts bring you insightful interviews with experts and well-known personalities on such pressing challenges as inequality and inclusive growth, the economy, jobs, the digital transformation, climate change, the environment, education, healthcare, tax, trade, international co-operation, and more. NOTE: All podcasts express the opinions of the interview subjects and do not necessarily represent the official views of OECD membe ...
 
“Can He Do That?” is The Washington Post’s politics podcast, exploring presidential power in the face of weakened institutions, a divided electorate and changing political norms. Led by host Allison Michaels, each episode asks a new question about this extraordinary moment in American history and answers with insight into how our government works, how to understand ongoing events, and the implications when so much about the current state of American life and the country’s politics is unlike ...
 
The world is facing the largest displacement crisis since WWII as a number of humanitarian emergencies rage on. Grant Gordon and Ravi Gurumurthy from the International Rescue Committee (IRC) have in-depth conversations with leading humanitarians, foreign policymakers, and innovators to understand how they think about, and tackle these global crises. Produced by the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
Cascades of breaking news stories flood front pages and social media feeds, cataclysmic events happen every day, entire industries have been formed around dissecting and understanding the news. With The Gateway, we'll go in-depth on developments submerged under the ocean of breaking news developments and explore issues poorly or under-reported on. From our offices in Amman, Jordan, we at Al Bawaba are breaking through the news.
 
How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the people we don't usually hear from? What solutions and leadership are emerging from the crisis? In each episode, we get a glimpse into the world that’s being created in the cracks of this crisis. We will hear from a range of individuals and social leaders, from migrant labourers to trans youth mobilizing in their communities, to humanitarian workers. Join us as we hear the experiences and responses of those living through this pandemic who are alread ...
 
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Green Wave

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Green Wave

Green Wave - Green European Journal

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Green Wave showcases some of the best articles from the Green European Journal - Europe’s leading political ecology magazine offering green & progressive ideas and analysis. For the text version of the articles and printed editions go to greeneuropeanjournal.eu, or follow GEJ on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram at @GreenEUJournal. Green Wave is also part of EuroPod, a network of European podcast shows which brings together journalistic, cultural, and institutional views on political and soci ...
 
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The IJLPP Podcast

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The IJLPP Podcast

Indian Journal of Law and Public Policy

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Indian Journal of Law and Public Policy (IJLPP) is a blind peer-reviewed, bi – annual, law and public policy publication. In the IJLPP Podcast we discuss major happenings of the legal and policy field from last week. We, at IJLPP, seek to create a platform where there is a flow of ideas and thoughts regarding issues which mutually relates to policy making and law.
 
Revolution. Socialism. Podcast. News. Views. Conversations. Media Criticism. MASS ACTION is a podcast and publications platform for socialist and working-class propaganda, news, views, conversations and more. MASS ACTION is anti-imperialist and anti-racist. MASS ACTION is joined with all mass movements for justice, joined to the revolutionary movement to defeat capitalism and replace it with Socialism. Why MASS ACTION? The planet and its people are facing The Great Crisis. The people of the ...
 
This way of life is a war against our bodies. The air polluting our lungs, our breast milk filled with toxins, and our mental angst driving us to suicide. Proposed health cuts increase our general precarity in relation to a failing health system, a health system that fundamentally furthers our objectification and dependency on capital. Therefore the steps we make to gain and share skills and develop subterranean practices of care can return some of the agency we’ve lost to the professionaliz ...
 
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show series
 
In this episode, we hear from Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia, and the author of a new book Reversing the Colonial Gaze: Persian Travelers Abroad, published by Cambridge University Press in 2020. Hamid follows the journeys of travelers from Iran and India as they go to Asia, Africa,…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you’ll hear about: Andrea Laurent-Simpson’s path in and out of and back into graduate school The story of her college dog, who became her family Why she became interested in looking at her pets as family members How her human kids reacted to her research project What her in-person research taught her ab…
 
Whether valorized as the heartland or derided as flyover country, the Midwest became instantly notorious when COVID-19 infections skyrocketed among workers in meatpacking plants—and Americans feared for their meat supply. But the Midwest is not simply the place where animals are fed corn and then butchered. Native midwesterner Kristy Nabhan-Warren …
 
The labor market shifted dramatically during the pandemic, and as employers once again begin to hire, many black and brown Americans are finding it difficult to return to work. Plus, women are participating less in the workforce than in the 1980s. We look at the reasons why. This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe and Labor and Workpl…
 
The OECD, in partnership with IBM, recently conducted a social media poll, asking young people about how well prepared they feel to join the world of work, how confident they are about their future paths and what concerns them about education and jobs in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this episode, the OECD’s Anthony Mann and IBM’s Lydia Log…
 
Exploring the relationship between gender and events, Doing Gender in Events: Feminist Perspectives in Critical Event Studies (Routledge, 2021) delivers an ethnographic analysis of the celebration of gender equality in the context of the culture-led event. Drawing upon Critical Event Studies, Anthropology of the Festive, and Gender Studies, it prov…
 
TikTok and Snapchat appeared for the first time before Congress alongside YouTube to answer questions about how safe their platforms are for young people. Senators are calling for regulations, the company representatives agreed, but dodged any real commitments. This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, political reporter Miles Parks, a…
 
Thousands of leaked documents from Facebook were viewed by more news organizations over the weekend including NPR. The internal sources show the company struggling with how to combat misinformation and researchers worrying about the impact of the platform. This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, political reporter Miles Parks, and te…
 
The Hungarian Marxist philosopher George Lukács has long occupied a complicated place in the Marxist canon of thinkers, both his lived and theoretical practice subject to much critical commentary and debate. While History and Class Consciousness is considered to be a classic of critical sociology, it has also often been held at arms length by Marxi…
 
The off-year election is the first test of how people are feeling ahead of a consequential midterm season for the Biden administration. And will the Justice Department prosecute Trump ally Steve Bannon for ignoring an order to appear before Congress? This episode: demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, WVTF reporter Jahd Khalil…
 
Willi Braun's Jesus and Addiction to Origins: Towards an Anthropocentric Study of Religion (Equinox, 2020) constitutes an extended argument for an anthropocentric, human-focused study of religious practices. Part I presents the basic premise of the argument, which is that there is nothing special or extraordinary about human behaviors and construct…
 
Today I spoke to Nick R. Smith to talk about how China's expansive new era of urbanization threatens to undermine the foundations of rural life, which he writes about in his recently published book The End of the Village: Planning the Urbanization of Rural China (U Minnesota Press, 2021). Centered on the mountainous region of Chongqing, which serve…
 
Politics for the Love of Fandom: Fan-Based Citizenship in a Digital World (Louisiana State Press, 2019) examines what Ashley Hinck calls “fan-based citizenship”: civic action that blends with and arises from participation in fandom and commitment to a fan-object. Examining cases like Harry Potter fans fighting for fair trade, YouTube fans donating …
 
The White House continues to negotiate with Democrats Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona over the president's social programs package. Core climate and community college provisions are on the chopping block, but the bill is still expected to come in at well over a trillion dollars. This episode: demographics and culture corr…
 
Today I talked to Sue Unerman about her new book Belonging: The Key to Transforming and Maintaining Diversity, Inclusions and Equality at Work (Bloomsbury, 2020) How is it that $8 billion a year gets thrown at diversity training and yet next-to-nothing changes? One person who isn’t giving up is Sue Unerman, who along with her co-authors Kathryn Jac…
 
Katherine Young, Turbulent Transformations: Non-Brahmin Śrīvaiṣṇavas on Religion, Caste and Politics in Tamil Nadu (Orient Blackswan, 2021) studies the interlinking of religious, social and political identities in modern Tamil Nadu. Through interviews with non-Brahmin Śrīvaiṣṇavas of many castes, but especially belonging to the lower-caste groups, …
 
What is the future of care? In The Care Crisis: What Caused It and How Can We End It? (Verso, 2021), Emma Dowling, an associate professor at the Institute for Sociology University of Vienna, introduces the extent of the global crisis of care. Drawing on a feminist perspective, the book thinks through the multiple ways that care is rendered invisibl…
 
Criminal Justice: An Examination is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Julian Roberts, Professor of Criminology at the University of Oxford. Julian Roberts is an international expert on sentencing throughout the common-law world and is strongly involved in connecting scholars with practitioners as well as promoting g…
 
Another high-profile voting rights push has failed because it did not attract enough Republican support to reach the de facto 60-vote threshold needed to pass legislation through the Senate. Will Democrats change the rules to pass their civil rights legislation with a simple majority? This episode: demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Ku…
 
School boards are the latest frontier in the culture wars, as incensed community members and right-wing activists protest mask mandates and anti-racist curricula. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, education correspondent Anya Kamenetz, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect: Subscribe to the NP…
 
Laurence Coderre’s Newborn Socialist Things: Materiality in Maoist China (Duke UP, 2021) is an exciting book that considers Chinese socialist culture seriously in terms of materiality and theory by tracing the contours of Maoist China through the heretofore unexpected lens of the commodity and consumerism. In Coderre’s book, the “newborn socialist …
 
The Biden administration announced that the U.S. will admit vaccinated foreign travelers beginning November 8th. Also: the latest on vaccination boosters and availability for kids. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political corrsepondent Mara Liasson, and science editor and correspondent Rob Stein. Connect: Subscribe t…
 
The mass shooting at a queer Latin Night in Orlando in July 2016 sparked a public conversation about access to pleasure and selfhood within conditions of colonization, violence, and negation. Queer Nightlife (U Michigan Press, 2021) joins this conversation by centering queer and trans people of color who apprehend the risky medium of the night to e…
 
The two senators who are forcing more negotiations over the Biden administration's multi-trillion dollar climate and social programs bill appear to have different priorities for what they want to see changed. But it is hard to know for sure: Kyrsten Sinema avoids reporters and has said little publicly about her views to the frustration of her Democ…
 
Stefano Sannino, the Secretary General of the EU's European External Action Service (EEAS), has rebuffed a claim from Russia's representative to the EU that the bloc is treating Russia as an "adversary". That comment by Vladimir Chizhov came amid claims from European lawmakers that Russia bore some responsibility for soaring gas prices across the c…
 
The foundations of the European Union were set in the aftermath of World War II. For many, this union of neighbouring nations is as much a peace project as anything else. However in 2021, military and defence concerns are back on European minds. EU nations were left scrambling to react to the American pullout from Afghanistan. There's also been ang…
 
In The Political Economy of Stigma: HIV, Memoir, Medicine, and Crip Positionalities (Ohio State UP, 2021), Ally Day offers a compelling critique of neoliberal medical practices in the US by coupling an analysis of HIV memoir with a critical examination of narrative medicine practice. Using insights from feminist disability studies and crip theory, …
 
A century ago, it was a given that a woman with a college degree had to choose between having a career and a family. Today, there are more female college graduates than ever before, and more women want to have a career and family, yet challenges persist at work and at home. This book traces how generations of women have responded to the problem of …
 
Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to st…
 
The Supreme Court heard arguments for and against reinstating the death penalty for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the Boston Marathon bomber. President Biden himself has argued against ever using the death penalty, but here his administration is arguing that Tsarnaev should receive the harshest punishment. This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, …
 
In this episode of The Gateway, we speak to Matthew Fuller, Professor of Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Eyal Weizman, Professor of Spatial and Visual Cultures, also at Goldsmiths. Eyal founded the research agency Forensic Architecture in 2010. Their investigations focus on a range of vital topics, including political viol…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you’ll hear about: The field of reproductive health studies The data on contraceptive access and effectiveness [even when used correctly] Why we need to trust women What happens when a pregnant person seeking an abortion is turned away The long-term outcomes for people who have had abortions The consequ…
 
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg tells NPR that the Biden administration is focused on resolving supply chain issues in time of the holiday shopping season. Also: what is a supply chain and why are they causing issues? This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, and chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley. Connect: Subscribe …
 
Some fields have an easier time describing themselves than others. "History is the study of past events." "Biology is the study of living organisms." But art? Is art a discipline? Is it a practice? Who gets to answer this most fundamental of questions, and why do we prefer not to try? Between Discipline and a Hard Place, written from the perspectiv…
 
Young voters broke for Joe Biden in 2020, but are shirking party affiliations in greater numbers than older generations. And it remains to be seen how millennials and Gen Z legislators will fit into existing political power structures: many top Democrats have been at the helm in Washington for decades and recruiting young candidates can be a challe…
 
Imaginaries of Connectivity: The Creation of Novel Spaces of Governance (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019) addresses the problem of how the creation of novel spaces of governance relates to imaginaries of connectivity in time. While connectivity seems almost ubiquitous today, it has been imagined and practiced in various ways and to varying political eff…
 
The TV show Impeachment: American Crime Story dramatizes Bill Clinton's impeachment through the stories of three women at the heart of the proceedings, including Monica Lewinsky. We discuss how the country and its politics have and haven't changed in the two decades since the impeachment unfolded. This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid…
 
An event-by-event look at how institutionalized racism harms the health of African Americans in the twenty-first century A crucial component of anti-Black racism is the unconscionable disparity in health outcomes between Black and white Americans. Sickening: Anti-Black Racism and Health Disparities in the United States (U Minnesota Press, 2021) exa…
 
Congress reached a deal to raise the debt ceiling enough to cover the government's spending for a few more months. Anemic job growth persists. Former president Trump is holding an Iowa rally this weekend and his continued flirtation with re-election has kept the Republican primary field on ice. This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe,…
 
Spain's foreign minister has responded to comments by the exiled Catalan independence leader Carles Puigdemont that Madrid is "using judicial power to achieve political goals", saying "in Spain, no one is above the law". On October 5, an Italian court suspended Puigdemont's extradition proceedings pending a ruling by the European Court of Justice –…
 
"Nobody is safe until everybody is safe". This phrase has become something of a mantra in Europe, as member states work to get their citizens protected from Covid-19. But does "everybody" include just the people who live in the EU, or the rest of the world as well? To discuss the issue in more detail, we're joined by two MEPs.…
 
Gitie House OAM has been a trailblazer in more ways than one in the 40-odd years since she arrived in Toowoomba. Originally from New Delhi, India, Gitie had dreamed of becoming a physicist from the age of nine--and by the time she married an Australian man and moved to Brisbane in 1978, she was already half way through her masters. Gitie was devast…
 
Tens of thousands of Afghans have been brought to the United States but most have not yet been resettled in communities. The process is complex, with multiple visa categories and gutted resettlement infrastructure all making the challenge more daunting for the Biden administration. This episode: demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtz…
 
Meet Alvin Brown, a Black man deported from Canada. Alvin Brown was adopted as a child and grew up in Canada. Unbeknownst to him, Alvin was not a Canadian citizen and had never acquired citizenship. As a young man, he came into conflict with the criminal law which rendered him inadmissible to Canada. Alvin tells us his heartbreaking story about the…
 
Today I talked to Soo Bong Peer about her new book The Essential Diversity Mindset: How to Cultivate a More Inclusive Culture and Environment (Career Press, 2021) In 1967, bans on interracial marriages were finally declared unconstitutional in America. Only a decade earlier than that, merely 4% of Americans endorsed them. Today, the figure is 87% a…
 
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