show episodes
 
Did you know that Europeans used to believe that sheep grew from Mongolian trees? Have you heard about the misbegotten discovery of a new form of water in the 1960s that set off a cold war arms race? Ever seen the gleaming Las Vegas hotel that accidentally shoots heat rays at poolside guests? The Constant is an audio history of getting things wrong. From ancient science to contemporary blunders, we take you on journeys of misadventure and misapprehension, filling your brain with juicy nugget ...
 
Where did we come from? One of humanity's most basic questions, the answer is fascinating. Weaving together insights from the fields of genetics, archaeology, linguistics, and paleoanthropology, hosts Spencer Wells and Razib Khan take us on a grand tour of human history. Scientific storytelling at its best.
 
The National Air and Space Museum contains the largest and most significant collection of air- and spacecraft in the world. Behind those amazing machines are thousands of stories of human achievement, failure, and perseverance. Join Emily, Matt, and Nick as they demystify one of the world’s most visited museums and explore why people are so fascinated with stories of exploration, innovation, and discovery.
 
More than 154 million treasures fill the Smithsonian’s vaults. But where the public’s view ends, Sidedoor begins. With the help of biologists, artists, historians, archaeologists, zookeepers and astrophysicists, host Lizzie Peabody sneaks listeners through the Smithsonian’s side door, telling stories that can’t be heard anywhere else. Check out si.edu/sidedoor and follow @SidedoorPod for more info.
 
Podcast dedicated to the side of history that goes bump in the night. Every episode's content features community time that includes listener mail and experiences, a “Moment In Oddity” and “History Of The Day” segments and then interviews and discussions about a historic location, event or person and the hauntings associated with the subject of the particular show. The tagline for the show is “Ghost tours for the theater of the mind” and our goal is to entertain you while creeping you out jus ...
 
Find us on Twitter - @HeathenHistory The Heathen History Podcast takes a deep dive into the modern history of Heathenry, a new religion based on the practices of the pre-Christian Germanic and Norse People. Each episode we will dive into a different person, event, or organization to tell their story and examine how this shaped modern Heathenry. Heathen History is an inclusive podcast. We support Declaration 127 and Heathens Against Hate.
 
Volcanoes. Trees. Drunk butterflies. Mars missions. Slug sex. Death. Beauty standards. Anxiety busters. Beer science. Bee drama. Take away a pocket full of science knowledge and charming, bizarre stories about what fuels these professional -ologists' obsessions. Humorist and science correspondent Alie Ward asks smart people stupid questions and the answers might change your life.
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
BackStory is a weekly public podcast hosted by U.S. historians Ed Ayers, Brian Balogh, Nathan Connolly and Joanne Freeman. We're based in Charlottesville, Va. at Virginia Humanities. There’s the history you had to learn, and the history you want to learn - that’s where BackStory comes in. Each week BackStory takes a topic that people are talking about and explores it through the lens of American history. Through stories, interviews, and conversations with our listeners, BackStory makes histo ...
 
This is a show about early American history. Awarded Best History Podcast by the Academy of Podcasters in 2017, it’s for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world. Each episode features conversations with professional historians who help shed light on important people and events in early American history. It is produced by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.
 
Join forensic engineer Sean Brady as he discusses engineering failures and disasters. Sean examines both the technical and human causes of failure, explores failures in a range of professions, and talks about why our decision making is not nearly as rational as we’d like to think. Follow our Twitter updates at @BradyHeywoodPod
 
80 Days is a podcast dedicated to exploring little-known countries, territories settlements and cities around the world. We're part history podcast, part geography podcast and part ramble. Each episode, we'll land in a new locale and spend some time discussing the history, geography, culture, sport, religion, industry, pastimes and music of our new location. More details on www.80dayspodcast.com, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram @80dayspodcast | Support us on www.patreon.com/80dayspodcast
 
Nine Days in July is a new podcast documentary series that explores each of the nine days of the Apollo 11 Mission, day by day, in nine 60-minute-long episodes. While telling the story of the mission to the moon as it occurs, we also spin back, and spin out, into stories about Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins, NASA, the Space Race, and the history of the world-at-large during those 9 Days in July.
 
Tsunamis, volcanoes, tornadoes, earthquakes...these are real-life monsters. We like to think we’re prepared for a catastrophe. But time and time again, Mother Nature proves us wrong. Each week, Natural Disasters examines the earth’s biggest catastrophes that took countless lives, destroyed communities, and toppled civilizations. Natural Disasters is a Parcast Original with new episodes released every Thursday.
 
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show series
 
Welcome to podcast episode #155. In this episode we have the pleasure of interviewing the Senior Fossil Preparator of the National History Museum in London, England; Mark R. Graham. In this episode we learn about Mark’s fascinating career and some of the amazing fossils he has worked with. If you would like to help support […]…
 
Ancient space rocks, dinosaur fossils, anthropological artifacts and biological specimens are housed in New York's world famous natural history complex on the Upper West Side -- the American Museum of Natural History! Throughout the 19th century, New Yorkers tried to establish a legitimate natural history venue in the city, including an aborted pla…
 
The crew of a ship called the White Lion traded several enslaved Africans for food and repairs on this day in 1619, often described as the beginning of slavery in what would become the United States. / On this day in 1858, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace's paper on the theory of evolution by natural selection was published in the Journal o…
 
Fraunces Tavern is one of America’s most important historical sites of the Revolutionary War and a reminder of the great importance of taverns on the New York way of life during the Colonial era. This revered building at the corner of Pearl and Broad street was the location of George Washington‘s farewell address to his Continental Army officers an…
 
This episode is the next in our oral history series, In Their Own Words. These pieces chronicle the stories of scientists who have made great contributions to their fields. Each month, we will publish in the pages of BioScience, and on this podcast, the results of these conversations. Today, we are joined by Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Ro…
 
Cleveland's Millionaires' Row was the place where the elite built their grand mansions in the early 1900s. Industry was booming and men like Marcus Hanna, Amasa Stone, Samuel Andrews, Charles F. Brush and John D. Rockefeller picked this sixth largest city in America as their home. These were some of the most powerful men in the country and their st…
 
We speak many words each day but most of us were never taught the actual (in use now) meaning of them. Many of the things we say mean the exact opposite of what we have intended to say. Until an effort is made to re-learn that words have meaning, being treated as lost at sea in the public realm will continue. It is possible to hold your position as…
 
The Grito de Dolores launched the Mexican War of Independence on this day in 1810. / On this day in 1979, the Strelzyk and Wetzel families escaped from East Germany to West Germany in a homemade hot air balloon. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Stephen Wolfram is a computer scientist, mathematician, and theoretical physicist. This is our second conversation on the podcast. Please check out our sponsors to get a discount and to support this podcast: – SimpliSafe: https://simplisafe.com/lex – Sun Basket, use code LEX: https://sunbasket.com/lex – MasterClass: https://masterclass.com/lex If y…
 
In podcast #157 we interview PhD Student Jack Cooper from the University of Swansea in Whales on his recent paper about the dimensions of Otodus megalodon. You’ll hear about he and his teams methods of estimating not only length, but also the size of the tail and fins of these amazing sharks. Here is a […]…
 
We’re back this month with the second installment of our side project, Voyages to Mars! Leaving Earth on your way to Mars, the first pit stop you might make is the Moon’s orbit. In this episode, we follow three Mars-bound space travelers from Mark Wicks’ novel, “To Mars via the Moon.” We see the Moon through the eyes of two Englishmen and a Scotsma…
 
Mammals: you’re one. Your dog is one. So are giant rats. What do we have in common? Nipples. The incredible Southern Illinois University professor, researcher, science communicator and mammalogist Dr. Danielle N. Lee joins to chat about everything from nature’s parenting styles to hairy bellies, milk glands, nip counts, how a meteor paved the way f…
 
Hello, Listener. Under better circumstances, you would be learning about erbium right about now. Unfortunately, that episode is not quite ready yet. Between my day job and the possibility of a very big move in my near future, I simply haven't had enough time to create a quality episode according to my usual schedule -- and I probably won't be able …
 
U.S. President William McKinley died on this day in 1901, having been shot by an assassin on September 6. / On this day in 1921, Constance Baker Motley, the first Black woman to be named a federal court judge, was born. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
Humanity’s most daring achievements are coming together in the new Spotify Original from Parcast! Every weekday, Incredible Feats introduces you to a new story of jaw-dropping physical strength, mental focus, and bizarre behavior. Join comedian Dan Cummins as he profiles the people who turned the impossible into the incredible, breaking records and…
 
Come hear about the longest migration on earth, and get your answers to these important questions: What is the world record for the longest distance walked? Why do birds migrate? Does this have anything to do with surfing? Bibliography: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Ry0glRBVbZCcxufI_ZCyfBE0b8kwb23qdZzwZtslmwc/edit?usp=sharing…
 
Remi and Niko join Comrade Adam from Red Library to discuss Kohei Saito's Capital, Nature, and the Unfinished Critique of Political Economy: Karl Marx's Ecosocialism. We discuss the concept of metabolism, Marx's evolution of thought on ecology being the core realm of capitalist crisis, agricultural chemistry, the role of a Marxist ecosocialist pers…
 
Phineas Gage was struck through the skull with a tamping iron on this day in 1848. / On this day in 1922, a fire in Smyrna in Asia Minor -- present-day İzmir, Turkey -- began blazing through the city. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
The gang discusses two papers that look at the wealth of information left behind on fossil bones which can let us know about the many organisms which worked to break down and decay dead animals. These feeding traces give clues to the presence of animals that might not easily fossilize. Plus, this topic is an excuse for James to suggest two papers t…
 
Manolis Kellis is a professor at MIT and head of the MIT Computational Biology Group. Please check out our sponsors to get a discount and to support this podcast: – Public Goods: https://publicgoods.com/lex and use code LEX – Magic Spoon: https://magicspoon.com/lex link & using code LEX at checkout – ExpressVPN: https://www.expressvpn.com/lexpod Le…
 
Finally, on the morning of February 21, all the population of the N1 assembly area and a residential area, situated just south of the launch pad, was ordered to evacuate. The giant service structure then rolled away leaving the dark-gray rocket with a white payload fairing towering under sunny skies. The weather was extremely cold, with temperature…
 
Of all the things we have lost in our precipitous fall from the 1800s, our perception of the Sun may represent best where we have come to exist. School told us it is some sort of nuclear furnace 93 million miles away, religion told us it is evil to consider and yet it remains the light of this world and that which drives our lives – truly. We have …
 
EPISODE #339: Interview with author Eric K. Washington, author of “Boss of the Grips: The Life of James H. Williams and the Red Caps of Grand Central Terminal”. The Red Caps of Grand Central Terminal were a workforce of hundreds of African-American men who were an essential part of the long-distance railroad experience. Passengers relied on Red cap…
 
Dinosaur George interviews paleontologist Dr. Alessandro Chiarenza about his recent paper on the discovery of the jaw of a juvenile Dromaeosaurid. Dinosaurs from the arctic region of Alaska are less known that those from the lower regions of Canada and the United States, so this discovery is of great significance. Visit Dr. Chiarenzas website for […
 
Most people think of the island of Bermuda as a tropical getaway with turquoise water and pink sand beaches. And while that is true, Bermuda has been known as the Isle of Devils. Much of the reason why was because of the stormy weather that has throttled the island, along with the treacherous ring of coral that has surrounded it. This also happens …
 
DNA fingerprinting was discovered on this day in 1984. / On this day in 1960, Ethiopian marathon runner Abebe Bikila set a world record for the marathon at the Olympics in Rome. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
If you’re a Broadway fan (or have been ANYWHERE near a theater in the last couple years), you’ve likely heard about Come From Away—the Tony-award-winning smash hit musical with a story firmly rooted in generations of aviation history. On September 11, 2001, 38 commercial airliners were diverted out of US air space to a small town with a big airport…
 
We have fallen a long way since the 1800s in terms of learning and knowing. Back in the day a Classic Education included foundational teachings tied to nature where there is no lie. We can still access abridged versions of the so-called seven liberal arts in the Quadrivium and Trivium. It has been said that no higher learning was possible without a…
 
The keys to conserving large mammals, such as bears, often lie in better understanding their ecophysiology. Armed with knowledge about the animals' energy needs, conservationists can encourage actions that better preserve populations and ensure that their habitats will be able to sustain them both now and as the climate continues to rapidly change.…
 
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