show episodes
 
Broadway stars, historical women, and family-friendly showstoppers. Musical theatre writing team Bird & Mirabella present a musical podcast focused on key, decision-making moments in the lives of history's greatest women. Through interactive storytelling and Broadway-style song, WWSDN keeps children searching for an answer, while ultimately learning a lesson in perseverance.
 
Decoder Ring Theatre presents new stories and characters inspired by the classic broadcasts of the Golden Age of Radio. The crimebusting exploits of The Red Panda - Canada's Greatest Superhero! The mystery of that hardest-boiled of detectives, Black Jack Justice... all this and more in full-length, full-cast recordings.
 
Original 'old time radio' style productions mixed with the old time radio shows of the past! Also, audio dramas from various online producers. No Copyright Infringement Intended. Note: Permission was given by various other producers to broadcast their particular shows on New West Radio Theatre. Unless otherwise noted, all shows are from the following web site. http://mobilesoftwaredesign.com/OldTimeRadio/OtrPlayer/otr_player.html New West Radio Theatre original productions are copyright 2016 ...
 
A dramatic reading of the twelve beloved original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring the most famous consultant detective of all time - Sherlock Holmes! Listen to the well-loved tales in audiobook form, with a wide cast and all the original twists and turns! Created and performed by performers in Victoria, Australia, during the coronavirus pandemic, aiming to give artists a platform during the isolation.
 
Project Nova is an original science fiction audio drama podcast created by Aaron Sarka and produced by Evil Kitten Productions. This fully produced audio drama follows the four subjects of a secret scientific experiment as they awaken to find themselves as the subjects of the mysterious Project Nova.
 
The drama onstage is nothing compared to what’s happening behind the scenes in this original episodic series. Bay City Theatre Artistic Director Lola Grant is performing the ultimate balancing act: running a small, LGBTQ+ theatre during a pandemic, keeping her family together, and producing a new play- that’s still missing an ending. A new kind of podcast for a different kind of world, New Conservatory Theatre Center’s "In Good Company" is a love letter to the resilience of art, artists, and ...
 
Each week join Josh Mitchell (@joshontheair) as he talks to small business owners, performers, industry folk and beyond about the trials and tribulations of life during COVID whilst also covering the return to raised curtains all over the world! We Are Theatre is about why we love the arts, what this industry means to us and why we believe the rest of the world needs our return as much as we do! Check out We Are Theatre on Instagram & Facebook to stay up to date!
 
Tabletop Theatre takes you into the world of Tabletop Roleplaying at its best. Each month features a new Game Master telling a unique story in 4 chapters that we release each Wednesday of that month. Enjoy Fantasy, Science Fiction or the Supernatural? Then this is definitely the show for you.
 
LocalTheatreNY.com's Podcast for theatre lovers everywhere. Taking you backstage to some of the hottest theatre in the New York Tri-State Area, from local, indy theatre to the broadway stage, we cover the shows, the productions, the people who bring you theatre, from acting coaches to actors, producers, directors, entire companies and more! FInd us at LocalTheatreNY.com
 
In House celebrates the breadth of talent and creativity in London. Each week we feature London’s most innovative theatres, big and small, from powerhouses like the National Theatre to engine rooms of creativity like the New Diorama.
 
Private Ear Audio Theatre (PEAT) presents live performances of classic and original works of audio drama in Brooklyn, New York. These productions are recorded so listeners may view them as intended in the Theatre of the Mind, bringing the sensibilities of the Golden Age of Radio to the modern era. PEAT champions the power of the audience’s imagination.
 
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show series
 
Kate Dossett's book Radical Black Theatre in the New Deal (UNC Press, 2020) turns conventional understandings of the Federal Theatre Project on its head. This book shines a light on the extraordinary work done by the FTP's Negro Units, which staged classic plays with Black casts as well as new plays by Black writers like Theodore Ward. These works …
 
Philadelphia's premiere theater company rings in the New Year of 1800 with their production of the spectacular Romance entitled "Blue Beard, or Female Curiosity". Meanwhile, in the audience, there are other dramatic events taking place! Join us on this Adventure in Theater History, as we take a snapshot of early American theater on the cusp of the …
 
Peter Filichia, James Marino, and Michael Portantiere talk with Doug Reside, Theatre Curator, New York Public Library. This Week on Broadway has been coming to you every week since 2009. It is the longest running Broadway and theatrical podcast with hundreds of shows giving thousands of reviews and interviews. Subscribe read more…
 
January 1939. The clouds of war hang over the city, although the conflict is far away. There is New News in the New Court, and brother, it ain’t just the hat show! An all-new audiobook treatment of part 1 of a 2-part Red Panda short story, written and read by Gregg Taylor. New episodes on the 1st and 15th of every month. Decoder Ring Theatre Season…
 
In her new book From Rabbit Ears to the Rabbit Hole: A Life with Television (University of Mississippi Press, 2021) TV scholar and fan Kathleen Collins reflects on how her life as a consumer of television has intersected with the cultural and technological evolution of the medium itself. In a narrative bridging television studies, memoir, and comic…
 
Christians are often thought of as defending only their own religious interests in the public square. They are viewed as worrying exclusively about the erosion of their freedom to assemble and to follow their convictions, while not seeming as concerned about publicly defending the rights of Muslims, Hindus, Jews, and atheists to do the same. In Lib…
 
In her new book From Rabbit Ears to the Rabbit Hole: A Life with Television (University of Mississippi Press, 2021) TV scholar and fan Kathleen Collins reflects on how her life as a consumer of television has intersected with the cultural and technological evolution of the medium itself. In a narrative bridging television studies, memoir, and comic…
 
Diana Souhami talks about her new book No Modernism Without Lesbians, out 2020 with Head of Zeus books. A Sunday Times Book of the Year 2020. This is the extraordinary story of how a singular group of women in a pivotal time and place – Paris, between the wars – fostered the birth of the Modernist movement. Sylvia Beach, Bryher, Natalie Barney, and…
 
Oodles and Oodles of Broadway Shows Announce Return Dates, Recapping What’s Coming Back and What Theaters are still Vacant “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated: Ashley Steves ashley@broadwayradio.com | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki grace@broadwayr…
 
In 1897, the United States was mired in the worst economic depression that the country had yet endured. So when all the newspapers announced gold was to be found in wildly enriching quantities at the Klondike River region of the Yukon, a mob of economically desperate Americans swarmed north. Within weeks tens of thousands of them were embarking fro…
 
In The Jean-Michel Basquiat Reader (University of California Press, 2021), Jordana Moore Saggese provides the first comprehensive sourcebook on the artist, closing gaps that have until now limited the sustained study and definitive archiving of his work and its impact. Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988) burst onto the art scene in the summer of 1980 …
 
Um retrato original da Bahia no século XIX, num livro cheio de movimento e vozes, sobretudo da gente negra. Em Ganhadores: A Greve Negra de 1857 na Bahia (Companhia das Letras, 2019), o historiador João José Reis reconstitui a história dos negros de ganho, ou ganhadores, protagonistas de uma insólita greve que paralisou o transporte na capital baia…
 
Just as early Christians sought out pieces of the cross or searched for the location of Noah's Ark, it is natural for members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to seek to interact with their history. The objects in this book constitute a glimpse at the richness of days gone by and allow us to see, heft, and handle those now-pricele…
 
In The Jean-Michel Basquiat Reader (University of California Press, 2021), Jordana Moore Saggese provides the first comprehensive sourcebook on the artist, closing gaps that have until now limited the sustained study and definitive archiving of his work and its impact. Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988) burst onto the art scene in the summer of 1980 …
 
Whether and how to reform, indeed to transform graduate education has been a matter for debate, discussion and experimentation over the past 30 years – at least. In The New PhD: How to Build a Better Graduate Education (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021), Leonard Cassuto and Robert Weisbuch look back at the many attempts, successes and failures …
 
All The Broadway Show Opening Announcements Fit To Print! “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated: Ashley Steves ashley@broadwayradio.com | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki grace@broadwayradio.com | @ItsGraceAkiJames Marino james@broadwayradio.com | @Ja…
 
Like the transdiscipline of cybernetics, the philosophical movement known as Existentialism rose to prominence in the decade following World War II, was communicated to the general public by a handful of charismatic evangelizers who, for a time, became bona fide celebrities in popular culture, generated much excitement and innovation on university …
 
Dr. Alison M. Parker’s new book Unceasing Militant: The Life of Mary Church Terrell (University of North Carolina Press, 2020) explores the life of civil rights activist and feminist, Mary Church Terrell. Born into slavery at the end of the Civil War, Terrell (1863-1954) became one of the most prominent activists of her time -- working at the inter…
 
Kate Dossett's book Radical Black Theatre in the New Deal (UNC Press, 2020) turns conventional understandings of the Federal Theatre Project on its head. This book shines a light on the extraordinary work done by the FTP's Negro Units, which staged classic plays with Black casts as well as new plays by Black writers like Theodore Ward. These works …
 
In More Than Medicine: Nurse Practitioners and the Problems They Solve for Patients, Health Care Organizations, and the State (Cornell UP, 2020), LaTonya J. Trotter chronicles the everyday work of a group of nurse practitioners (NPs) working on the front lines of the American health care crisis as they cared for four hundred African American older …
 
Christina Ward’s newest book American Advertising Cookbooks: How Corporations Taught Us to Love Spam, Bananas, and Jell-O (Process Media, 2019) examines a familiar but understudied sub-genre of commercially published cookbooks. Advertising cookbooks were most popular in the middle decades of the 20th century. They are usually published by a company…
 
Kate Dossett's book Radical Black Theatre in the New Deal (UNC Press, 2020) turns conventional understandings of the Federal Theatre Project on its head. This book shines a light on the extraordinary work done by the FTP's Negro Units, which staged classic plays with Black casts as well as new plays by Black writers like Theodore Ward. These works …
 
Dr. Alison M. Parker’s new book Unceasing Militant: The Life of Mary Church Terrell (University of North Carolina Press, 2020) explores the life of civil rights activist and feminist, Mary Church Terrell. Born into slavery at the end of the Civil War, Terrell (1863-1954) became one of the most prominent activists of her time -- working at the inter…
 
Providing one of the first comprehensive, cross-cultural examinations of the dynamic market for sexual services, this book presents an evidence-based look at the multiple factors related to purchasing patterns and demand among clients who have used the internet. The data is drawn from two large surveys of sex workers' clients in the US and UK. The …
 
Peter Filichia, James Marino, and Michael Portantiere talk with Kathleen Chalfant. This Week on Broadway has been coming to you every week since 2009. It is the longest running Broadway and theatrical podcast with hundreds of shows giving thousands of reviews and interviews. Subscribe to BroadwayRadio in Apple Podcasts by read more…
 
What We Know about Broadway’s Reopening, NYC’s City Artist Corps, Matt on Orlando Shakes’ ‘Little Shop of Horrors’ “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated: Ashley Steves ashley@broadwayradio.com | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki grace@broadwayradio.com…
 
After getting their hands on some disturbing footage, the team stumble on a young photographer's dark secret. Will they be able to maintain their cover or will this job be too much to handle?Get a copy here: https://shop.arcdream.com/products/delta-green-the-role-playing-game-hardback-slipcase-setFollow us!--FB: bit.ly/MindPlayersFB--Insta: bit.ly/…
 
In the wake of the George Floyd killing, many Americans are engaging in a renewed debate about the role violence and especially police violence, plays in American society. In A Pattern of Violence: How the Law Classifies Crimes and What it Means for Justice (Harvard UP, 2020), David Alan Sklansky, the Stanley Morrison Professor of Law at Stanford L…
 
In the wake of the George Floyd killing, many Americans are engaging in a renewed debate about the role violence and especially police violence, plays in American society. In A Pattern of Violence: How the Law Classifies Crimes and What it Means for Justice (Harvard UP, 2020), David Alan Sklansky, the Stanley Morrison Professor of Law at Stanford L…
 
The only constant in Western history is change. Susan Lee Johnson, Harry Reid Endowed Chair in the History of the Intermountain West at UNLV, knows this better than most. Author of the Bancroft Prize Winning "Roaring Camp," (2000), Johnson's new book is a testament to the changing nature of Western history. In Writing Kit Carson: Fallen Heroes in a…
 
Political Scientist Heath Brown’s new book, Homeschooling the Right: How Conservative Education Activism Erodes the State (Columbia UP, 2021) is an excellent overview of the homeschooling movement in the United States, but it is much more than an exploration of that movement, since it centers on the way that this movement developed into a parallel …
 
Dismissal, in fact, is the default response to khayal (the preeminent genre of North Indian classical music), well before we get to know what khayal is, and vaguely term its strangeness 'classical music'. Those who later become acquainted with its extraordinary melodiousness forget that on the initial encounter it had sounded unmelodious. These wor…
 
The origins of American public schools can help shed light on continued contemporary discussions around religion and education in American discourse. In The Common School Awakening: Religion and the Transatlantic Roots of American Public Education (Oxford UP, 2020), historian David Komline explores the rise of educational models that introduced pro…
 
How should we understand creative work? In Creative Control: The Ambivalence of Work in the Culture Industries (Columbia UP, 2021), Michael Siciliano, an assistant professor of sociology at Queen's University, Canada, explores this question through a comparison of a recording studio and a digital content creation company. The book considers the mea…
 
In Gentrification Down the Shore (Rutgers University Press, 2020), Molly Vollman Makris and Mary Gatta engage in a rich ethnographic investigation of Asbury Park to better understand the connection between jobs and seasonal gentrification and the experiences of longtime residents in this beach-community city. They demonstrate how the racial inequal…
 
In Losing Hearts and Minds: American Iranian Relations and International Education During the Cold War (Cornell UP, 2017), Matthew K. Shannon, an associate professor of history at Emory & Henry College, shows the complex role that Iranian student migration to the United States played in shaping the relations between the two countries. For U.S. poli…
 
“Pass Over” to Open at August Wilson Theatre, “Wicked” to Hit the Road in August, New Duncan Sheik Musical Announced “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated: Ashley Steves ashley@broadwayradio.com | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki read more…
 
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