show episodes
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
A selection of seminars and special lectures on wide-ranging topics relating to practical ethics. The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics was established in 2002 with the support of the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education of Japan. It is an integral part of the philosophy faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.
 
Reimagine is a new and original podcast series from the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University’s Said Business School, presented by Peter Drobac. In this series we meet the visionaries, the disruptors, the world’s problem-solvers, who are taking up the challenge of fixing the bits of our world that are broken. The people who see things differently, and we need them now more than ever.
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, hosts Professor Adam Smith and Dr Alice Kelly talk to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
Find out more about our night sky, from new planets to far-off galaxies and the vastness of the Universe. A series of short talks and presentations for the general public from leading astronomy researchers at the Oxford University Physics department - http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/
 
Welcome to the Oxford Adult ESL Conversations podcast, hosted by Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, co-author of the Oxford Picture Dictionary and series director of the new Step Forward Second Edition. In this podcast series, Jayme is joined by Adult ESL educators, thought leaders, and advocates for candid conversations about topics important to teachers in this dynamic field.
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
The Department of Physics public lecture series. An exciting series of lectures about the research at Oxford Physics take place throughout the academic year. Looking at topics diverse as the creation of the universe to the science of climate change. Features episodes previously published as: (1) 'Oxford Physics Alumni': "Informal interviews with physics alumni at events, lectures and other alumni related activities." (2) 'Physics and Philosophy: Arguments, Experiments and a Few Things in Bet ...
 
Welcome to CortexCast, the podcast that provides in-depth interviews with world leading Neuroscientists. Through conversations that are accessible to anyone with an interest in science, we explore cutting edge techniques, challenges in the field and how these researchers think not only about the brain but life in general. CortexCast is the official podcast of the Oxford University Cortex Club, a student run society that connects local and internationally recognised neuroscientists with stude ...
 
In this fun and informative series Dr Lindsay Turnbull, Associate Professor and Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford University, looks at the biology of the back garden. This series is recorded hot off the press in a normal garden in England beginning in March 2020 and would be of interest to anyone from age 5+. The series is particularly useful for children missing school who would like to carry on practical work in their own garden and have an expert help them understand the theory behind ...
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law at Oxford website. .
 
Fantasy Literature has emerged as one of the most important genres over the past few decades and now enjoys extraordinary levels of popularity. The impact of Tolkien’s Middle-earth works and the serialisation of George Martin’s ‘Game of Thrones’ books has moved these and their contemporaries into mainstream culture. As the popularity grows so does interest in the roots of fantasy, the main writers and themes, and how to approach these texts. Oxford is a natural home to fantasy literature wit ...
 
The AWS Podcast is the definitive cloud platform podcast for developers, dev ops, and cloud professionals seeking the latest news and trends in storage, security, infrastructure, serverless, and more. Join Simon Elisha and Jeff Barr for regular updates, deep dives and interviews. Whether you’re building machine learning and AI models, open source projects, or hybrid cloud solutions, the AWS Podcast has something for you.
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
The Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford is the largest university library system in the United Kingdom. It includes the principal University library - the Bodleian Library - which has been a legal deposit library for 400 years; as well as 28 other libraries across Oxford including major research libraries and faculty, department and institute libraries. Together, the Libraries hold more than 12 million printed items, over 80,000 e-journals and outstanding special collections inclu ...
 
Many of us have phases where we have no idea what we’re doing, or everything feels like it’s going wrong: that we are failing, or even that we are failures. Sometimes such phases feel less like phases than a permanent default. And often we assume – wrongly – that no one else ever feels the same. This is an initiative intended to help make it OK to think and talk about failure. It includes five podcasts and a workbook. Find out more about the contributors, download the workbook, and give feed ...
 
The Department of Statistics at Oxford is a world leader in research including computational statistics and statistical methodology, applied probability, bioinformatics and mathematical genetics. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Oxford's Mathematical Sciences submission was ranked overall best in the UK. This is an exciting time for the Department. We have now moved into our new home on St Giles and we are currently settling in. The new building provides improved lecture and ...
 
This two-day conference provided a forum for academics, practitioners and government representatives to evaluate the current debate and future shape of the post-2015 agenda from a human rights perspective. It was focused on both theoretical and practical aspects of integrating human rights in the post-2105 agenda, with a particular focus on poverty, environment and peace and security.
 
The mind is a fascinating entity. Where, after all, would we be without it? But what exactly is it? These days many people believe the mind simply is the brain. Descartes would have disagreed profoundly. He recommended a dualism of substance. Modern philosophers are again finding various forms of dualism attractive because the problems with physicalism are so intractable. One such problem is whether the mind, like the brain, is located in space (specifically inside the head). But does philos ...
 
The Transformations research cluster is one of the core research clusters in the School for Geography and the Environment. Building upon our strengths in the geography of finance, work and employment, gender, class and ethnicity, governance, social justice and social change in both the developed and developing worlds, the Transformations research cluster seeks to better understand both institutional and life-cycle change, inter-generational equity and commitment, and mobilities at different ...
 
Have you ever been lazy and had things just come to you? Whether through fruition, random success, or via a subconscious thought? Well, here we talk about all of it! Join Alan PrepZilla and Justin for weekly banter as we talk about news, politics, and even the occasional pet issue, all while discussing how to go through life lazy (yet successfully)! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lazyyetsuccessful/support
 
Professor of Poetry Alice Oswald gives her lectures on poetry, language, literature, beauty and life every term. The Professor of Poetry lectures were conceived in 1708 by Berkshire landowner Henry Birkhead and began after he bequeathed some money so it could be a valuable supplement to the curriculum. He believed ‘the reading of the ancient poets gave keenness and polish to the minds of young men as well as to the advancement of more serious literature both sacred and human’. The first poet ...
 
Douglas W. Stephey, O.D., M.S. is a full-service eye and vision care provider in Southern California and is a sought-after conference speaker, educator, and passionate advocate for patients diagnosed with ADHD, parents with a child that lands on the Autistic spectrum, and students in special education. This podcast will educate you about common eye problems, how nutrition plays is a key role in your vision health, what exactly is 20/20 vision and why seeing 20/20 is not enough to move, look, ...
 
America feels divided. From the most salient questions about our national identity and place in the world, to fundamental concerns about technology, religion, the economy, and public policy, Intelligence Squared U.S. is here to help. A respite from polarized discussions, we bring together the smartest minds to debate and dissect issues in depth, restoring civility and bringing intelligence to the public square in the process.
 
Loading …
show series
 
In todays episode of Lazy, Yet Successful. Alan & Justin talk about Donald Trump and Joe Biden Town Halls and how Joe Biden won the "Debate". Also! Alan is going to Oxford University for his Masters in Theology! EXCITING! The Apple iPhone event was last Tuesday and the iPhone 12 lineup is going to be so great for us. Alan is getting the iPhone 12 P…
 
Ugur Ungar Paramilitarism Ugur Ungor discusses Paramilitarism Check out this book here https://amzn.to/3ivil4q Interview Summary Ugur Umit Ungor is a professor of Holocaust and Genocide Studies and has researched paramilitarism for years and has recently published a book on the topic. We discussed the book and the various paramilitaries that have f…
 
From precious moonwater to a handful of asteroid that could provide clues to the origins of life, recent discoveries in our solar system lead host Alok Jha to investigate fundamental questions about the universe. How did life on Earth begin? Could earthly evolution provide a guide to what life elsewhere might be like? And what about the end of ever…
 
Has history worked out the way so many have hoped? What did “progress” used to look like and who could possibly have been against it? What areas of human life and political realms does the term “progress” encompass? As Sarah Palin famously asked in 2010, “How's that hopey-changey stuff working out for ya?” It turns out that some major, influential …
 
Today Simon is joined by Seth Eliot, Principal Reliability SA for the AWS Well-Architected program, to learn all about the recent updates to the Reliability Pillar of the Well-Architected Framework. They dig into the recent changes that were made, and how to build a resilient workload that quickly recovers from failures to meet business and custome…
 
Federica Cherubini speaks with Rasmus Nielsen and Richard Fletcher, two of the authors of a recent report about the coronavirus communication crisis in the UK. Federica Cherubini speaks with Rasmus Nielsen and Richard Fletcher, two of the authors of a recent report about the coronavirus communication crisis in the UK. The report stresses that a lar…
 
In this special episode, Oxford historian Charlotte Moberly tells the story of how the French intellectual and pioneer of second-wave feminism, Simone de Beauvoir was personally and intellectually transformed by her visit to America in 1947. This is the first of a new occasional series of short podcasts exploring individuals' encounters with Americ…
 
This is an audio recording of a live event held in Oxford on Oct 26, 2020 to discuss the role of race in the 2020 election. The panel were Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Wesley Lowery, Michigan State political scientist Nazita Lajevardi, and Maria Givens from the Native American Agricultural Fund. The chair is Dr Mitch Robertson, Fellow of the R…
 
When Judith G. Coffin discovered a virtually unexplored treasure trove of letters to Simone de Beauvoir from Beauvoir's international readers, it inspired Coffin to explore the intimate bond between the famed author and her reading public. This correspondence, at the heart of Sex, Love, and Letters: Writing Simone de Beauvoir (Cornell UP, 2020), im…
 
Lesley M.M. Blume interview about her WWII history book John Hersey and his 1946 reporting about Hiroshima Check out this book here https://amzn.to/3jrcwFt Interview Summary Lesley M.M. Blume is an award-winning journalist, historian, and bestselling author. She’s written a huge amount of material and her latest publication, Fallout, is a study of …
 
What would a Justice Amy Coney Barrett mean for American law and politics? Should Democrats try to reform the Court? Two of the nation's top constitutional minds weigh-in, with John Donvan as your intellectual referee in this special episode of Intelligence Squared. Erwin Chemerinsky - Dean, University of California Berkeley School of Law Saikrishn…
 
In her stunning and conceptually adventurous new book Emotions and Colonial Modernity in Colonial India: From Balance to Fervor (Oxford University Press, 2020), Margrit Pernau examines the varied and hugely consequential expressions of and normative investments in emotions in modern South Asian Muslim thought. By considering a wide array of sources…
 
The third debate is over, and none of this really matters. Biden won the debate, but that doesn’t really matter either. What matters is the depravity of Donald Trump that these debates continue to expose. Learn more about the latest in Trump’s incompetency on this episode of Lazy Yet Successful politics! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/…
 
Sir Noel Malcolm’s captivating new book, Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750 (Oxford University Press, 2019), tells the story of Western European fascination with the Ottoman empire and Islam between the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the latter half of the 18th century. This beautifully argued, …
 
As new waves of covid-19 sweep around the world, scientists are clashing over the concept of herd immunity. Host Kenneth Cukier asks scientists on both sides of the debate whether covid-19 should be left to spread freely among the young and healthy? Also, the Department of Justice's federal antitrust lawsuit against Google—we search what this means…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events!. Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Join us to discuss Imagined Journeys: Pilgrimage, Diplomacy, and Colonialism in Medieval Europe - Professor Marion Turner (Faculty …
 
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern impe…
 
Today Simon is joined by Ben Potter, Principal Security Lead for the AWS Well-Architected program, to learn all about the recent updates to the Security Pillar of the Well-Architected Framework. They dig into the recent changes that were made to the Security Pillar, and focus key topics including; protecting information and systems, confidentiality…
 
In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited impact of what I write, but I continue to believe that the stakes are high. – Mi…
 
What is Badiou’s theory of emancipation? For whom is this emancipation possible? Does emancipation entail an indifference to difference? In Universal Emancipation: Race Beyond Badiou (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) (Minnesota University Press, 2020), Elisabeth Paquette pursues these questions through a sustained conversation with decolonial t…
 
The Protestant Reformation looms large in our cultural imagination. In the standard telling, it’s the moment the world went modern. Casting off the shackles and superstitions of medieval Catholicism, reformers translated the Bible into the vernacular and democratized religion. In this story, it’s no wonder that Protestantism should give birth to li…
 
What is Badiou’s theory of emancipation? For whom is this emancipation possible? Does emancipation entail an indifference to difference? In Universal Emancipation: Race Beyond Badiou (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) (Minnesota University Press, 2020), Elisabeth Paquette pursues these questions through a sustained conversation with decolonial t…
 
America is in a Cold Civil War, between people who see each other as threats to the country — but themselves as patriots. How can that be? They are patriots of two nations. In Patriots of Two Nations: Why Trump Was Inevitable and What Happens Next (McDavid Media), national media commentator and presidential campaigns veteran Spencer Critchley shows…
 
The German philosopher Martin Heidegger’s influence over the last several decades of philosophy is undeniable, but his place in the canon has been called into question in recent years in the wake of the publication of his private journals kept throughout his life, including during his involvement with the Nazi Party. This has led to a renewal of an…
 
Stefan Bauer has written an outstanding study of one of the most important Catholic historians in early modern Europe. Bauer, who has just taken up a new position teaching history at Warwick University, UK, has spent much of the last decade working on the life and work of Onofrio Panvinio. The result, The Invention of Papal History: Onofrio Panvini…
 
One of the central threads in the public discourse on Black womanhood is the idea of the “Jezebel.” This trope deems Black women and girls as dishonorable and sexually deviant and the stereotype is circulated from the big screen to the pulpit. Tamura Lomax, Associate Professor at Michigan State University, outlines a historical genealogy of the dis…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Join Dr Alex Lloyd (Fellow by Special Election in German, St Edmund Hall, Oxford) and Tom Herring (Artistic Director of SANSARA) to …
 
Frank Sisson and Robert Wise talk about the WWII military history book “I Marched With Patton” Check out this book here https://amzn.to/3lQUOwO Interview Summary Frank Sisson joined the US Army in 1943 at the age of 18. He went into the artillery and fought in Europe alongside Patton’s forces. He wrote his memoir with Robert Wise and I spoke to the…
 
We can't imagine a political campaign without music -- whether it's an election rally, a protest movement or a TV ad, music is essential. In this episode, Adam talks to Billy Coleman, author of a recent book about music and politics in the nineteenth century United States and asks him what music brings to politics and what we can learn from it abou…
 
In Vicissitudes of the Goddess: Reconstructions of the Gramadevata in India's Religious Traditions (Oxford UP, 2013), Padma (Bowdoin College) focuses on two types of Gramadevatas or goddesses: deified women and those associated with disease and fertility. Setting these figures in the context of their Brahmanic transformation into popular goddesses …
 
We explore computer-generated virtual worlds and their use in everything from film-making to architecture. What will it take to build a real Metaverse, a persistent virtual world that anyone can plug into? This vision, though born in the minds of science fiction writers, is shaping the real-world ambitions of much of the tech world. Host Alok Jha t…
 
Alberto Giubilini and David Jones trade views and argue each other's position on conscientious objection in healthcare In this unusual online debate, Alberto Guibilini (Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics) and David Jones (The Anscombe Bioethics Centre) adopt each other's position on conscientious objection, arguing for the opposing view in a…
 
Anglophone philosophy in the twentieth century was centered, to an unprecedented extent, around journals: periodical publications that aimed to present (one vision of) the best philosophical work of the moment. By looking at the trends across these journals, we can see important trends in philosophy itself. But looking at the journals is easier sai…
 
The Operational Excellence Pillar focuses on running and monitoring systems to deliver business value, and continually improving processes and procedures. Today Simon is joined by Brian Carlson, global Operational Excellence Lead for the AWS Well-Architected program, to learn all about the recent updates to the Well-Architected Framework. They dig …
 
This is a special episode of the podcast: a panel discussion on zoom recorded on Monday 12 October, 2020, to analyse the state of the 2020 presidential race. The participants were Thomas Edsall of the New York Times, Dave Wasserman of the Cook Political Report, and Samara Klar of the University of Arizona. The chair was Adam Smith of the Rothermere…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. Decolonisation the Curriculum Week. Join Homi K. Bhabha, Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University, and P…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Humanities and Policy Week Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. The World After COVID: In conversation with Professor Peter Frankopan (Stavros Niarchos Foundation Direct…
 
Religious freedom debates set blood boiling. Just consider notable Supreme Court cases of recent years such as Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission or Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania. How can we reach any agreement between those who adhere strictly to the demands of divine law and the individual conscience and those f…
 
In Gilded Age America, people and animals lived cheek-by-jowl in environments that were dirty and dangerous to man and animal alike. The industrial city brought suffering, but it also inspired a compassion for animals that fueled a controversial anti-cruelty movement. From the center of these debates, Henry Bergh launched a shocking campaign to gra…
 
In conversation with Dr Erica Charters and Robin Gorna. TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Performance Week​ Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities.How have societies responded to pandemics, throughout the w…
 
TORCH Goes Digital! presents a series of weekly live events Big Tent - Live Events! Translation Week Part of the Humanities Cultural Programme, one of the founding stones for the future Stephen A. Schwarzman Centre for the Humanities. This event presents a conversation between academic, translator and writer Karen Leeder and poet, performer and nov…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2020 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login