show episodes
 
C
COMPLEXITY

1
COMPLEXITY

Santa Fe Institute, Michael Garfield

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
Art and philosophy for an age of accelerating weirdness! Join paleontologist-futurist Michael Garfield and an avalanche of amazing guests for deep but irreverent discussions at the edge of the known and knowable: on science and the philosophy of it, prehistory and post-humanity and deep time, non-human agency and non-duality, science fiction and self-fulfilling prophecies, complex systems and sustainability (or lack thereof), psychedelics as a form of training for proliferating futures, art ...
 
Welcome to Paleo Bites, the weekly podcast hosted by Matthew Donald where we make dumb jokes, reference pop culture, derail like crazy, and oh yeah, discuss and rate prehistoric animals. Each episode Matthew and a rotating set of guest co-hosts talk about a different genus of primeval critter, explain basic stats, exchange plenty of banter, barely fact-check, and at the end, rate the creature one out of 65 million for any reason, including but not limited to sexiness, mana, and dexterity. So ...
 
Walter Besant was a novelist and historian, and his topographical and historical writings, ranging from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century, were probably best known through the detailed 10-volume Survey of London published after his death. This earlier single volume covers, in less depth, the whole period from prehistory until the 19th century. The book appears originally to have been written for boys, and, indeed, the chapters are called "Lessons". However, it is a very readable hi ...
 
Struggling Academics is a bi-monthly educational podcast for everyone interested in ideas, intellectual life and academic pursuits. At Struggling Academics, we deliberately venture into areas to which none of the hosts necessarily claim expertise. In each episode Dr. Andrasi (linguist), Dr. Clinnick (archaeologist), Dr. Pedersen (philosopher) & Dr. Vladescu (anthropologist/philologist) will discuss a particular topic with an uplifting and positive twist ranging from singular human experience ...
 
Stone Circles are one of the most enigmatic traces of the people that lives in Britain and Ireland thousands of years ago. But perhaps you have wondered what other types of archaeological sites and evidence we have from this period, what peoples’ lives were like thousands of years ago, or how archaeologists use the things they find to interpret life in the past? If you have, come and join the archaeologists from Project TIME as they embark on a new project to investigate Prehistoric Britain ...
 
! 𝗡𝗘𝗪 ! Episodes of Jamie Rose’s podcast entitled 𝗧𝗥𝗔𝗡𝗦𝗜𝗦𝗧𝗢𝗥𝗜𝗘 regularly publised from November onwards. What it means or has meant to be trans, explores Jamie in a dialogue with Johanna Nejedlová. More info >> www.institutuzkosti.cz << The Institute of Anxiety creates a space for the study of anxiety, which is spreading throughout society and manifests itself through insomnia, stress, alienation, loss of empathy, inequalities, and violence. It is suppressed without success by products of th ...
 
Join me on my journey through the world of ancient Indian philosophy! In each podcast, I will try to summarize different topics in Indian philosophy and tell you about the historical events that were occurring on the Indian subcontinent at that time. My goal is to make Indian philosophy accessible to everyone so don't worry if you don't know anything about Indian history or philosophy - just sit back, pay attention, and let me guide you through the world of Indian thought.
 
Loading …
show series
 
For the first episode of The Backpacker's Guide To Prehistory season two, host David Mountain travels back to the Carboniferous period, 359-299 million years ago. In this weird world of giant horsetails and monster arthropods, what creatures should you look out for? What clothes should you pack? And is it really such a good idea to light a campfire…
 
Episode 41 (aka Season 3 episode 2): On January 2nd 1923, John Reith interviewed Miss Frances Isobel Shields for a job at the BBC, to be his secretary. At the time the BBC had four or five male staff members. Miss Shields started work on January 8th, instantly making the BBC a 20% female organisation. It's been greater than that ever since. This ep…
 
China’s written history goes back more than 3,000 years, stretching deep into the Bronze Age. But just how far back does it go, and how reliable are those first legendary texts when discussing a world that had already been lost for centuries? They speak of powerful kings and capital cities, and a dynasty called the Xia, but can we find them in the …
 
This week I talk with four brilliant people working in and around the study of complex systems about the World Wide Web’s co-evolution with cryptocurrencies and other distributed ledger technologies: the promise AND the peril; the good, the bad, and the ugly. It’s a hugely complicated topic and there wasn’t enough time in this panel for Complexity …
 
(image source: https://novum-terram.fandom.com/wiki/Sivatherium_giganteum_(SciiFii)) Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Laura Owsley discuss Sivatherium, a hoofed mammal that might have lived both before and a little after the Ice Age, which is impressive, since I can barely make it through winter in my apartment. From the Miocene to the Pleisto…
 
We are back and continuing with the story of Oasatsuma Wakugo, aka Ingyō Tennō, and this time around he has a bit of thorny problem on his hands: names. Specifically that people are just taking family names willy-nilly, claiming high rank. So we'll look into just what names mean and why the fledgling state even cares. We'll also talk about a few of…
 
A late entry into the worst people ever compendium, Tomas de Torquemada, the first and greatest Grand Inquisitor of The Spanish Inquisition. A man who began with a broad national mandate to root out heretics and insincere converses, and ended so loathed by everyone in Spain that he needed armed escorts wherever he went. A zealot so intransigent tha…
 
How did Latin splinter into the Romance languages? In this episode, we explore how Latin transformed from a single, widely dispersed language into a series - French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, and so on - of related but no longer mutually intelligible tongues. Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, an…
 
Some people say we’re all in the same boat; others say no, but we’re all in the same storm. Wherever you choose to focus the granularity of your inquiry, one thing is certain: we are all embedded in, acting on, and being acted upon by the same nested networks. Our fates are intertwined, but our destinies diverge like weather forecasts, hingeing on …
 
(image source: https://bit.ly/3sOeVlW) Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Lawrence Mack discuss Triceratops, the last of the big four of five dinosaurs any witless schmuck can name to cover on this show. From the Late Cretaceous, this 30-foot chasmosaurine ceratopsian was identified after being uncovered by a cowboy in Wyoming, making it by defa…
 
China’s late Neolithic period saw the emergence of increasingly powerful groups of elites who buried themselves in lavishly decorated tombs and built palaces and public buildings at the hearts of their fortified settlements. From these political centers, the elites built and ruled a patchwork of small, competing states. But by around 2000 BC, all o…
 
(image source: https://dinopedia.fandom.com/wiki/Opabinia) Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Stephen Curro discuss Opabinia, a freakish alien bugger that looks like it stepped straight out of a Doctor Who set. From the Mid Cambrian, this 3-inch stem arthropod had a digestive system in the shape of a U, which as a recovering bulimic, I can relat…
 
The backpack is back! The 17th January 2022 sees the long-awaited/half-forgotten return of The Backpacker's Guide To Prehistory - the podcast that provides top travel tips for time travellers. Across six brand new episodes, host David Mountain will be asking experts in palaeobiology about the most important, interesting and exciting aspects of our …
 
Happy New Year, 1923! And Happy New Season: 3, that is, as we tell the story of the BBC's 3rd-6th months. Formative times at Auntie Beeb, as the staff grows from 4 in one room to a new premises at Savoy Hill. Season 3 begins with this, episode 40 overall, on New Year's Day 1923. John Reith, Arthur Burrows, Cecil Lewis and Major Anderson begin work …
 
States have defined China from the very beginning of its recorded history more than 3,000 years ago, but how did they come into being? Professor Li Liu of Stanford University is one of the world’s leading experts on the prehistoric archaeology of China, and she returns to Tides for the second time to tell us about states, elites, and why they’re so…
 
5. epizodaStonewall: co předcházelo a co následovalo V dalším díle podcastu se zaměříme na dvě důležitá povstání 60. let spojená s trans historií – Compton’s Cafeteria a Stonewall – a přiblížíme si životy dvou významných trans žen, Marshy P. Johnson a Sylvie Rivery, jejichž jména bývají zmiňována, ale jejichž činy a životy zůstávají opomíjeny. Dopo…
 
The late Bronze Age world of the Near East was an incredibly rich and complex place, full of long-distance trade, the exchange of ideas, bickering kings, and empires rising and falling. Among those empires, one of the most powerful and enigmatic was that of the Hittites, whose ruling dynasty survived more than five centuries of intrigue and war to …
 
If you’re honest with yourself, you’re likely asking of the last two years: What happened? The COVID-19 pandemic is a prism through which our stories and predictions have refracted…or perhaps it’s a kaleidoscope, through which we can infer relationships and causes, but the pieces all keep shifting. One way to think about humankind’s response to COV…
 
(image source: https://bit.ly/3d8sZhj) Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Natasha Krech discuss Nanjinganthus, an organism that really stretches the definition of “prehistoric animal” in that it flat-out breaks it by not being an animal at all. From the Mid Jurassic, this ancient plant might have been the first flower known to science, pushing t…
 
This week on Future Fossils, metamodern magick ritual artist, yogini, songwriter, and delicious weirdo Scout-Lieder Wiley and I ask: “How are you supposed to repair the darkness if you don’t own the darkness?” And we have much fun and profound exploration besides, into the performance of expertise, the virtue of naïveté, integral theory without the…
 
Hullo hullo-ho-ho! Welcome to 2021's Christmas special, unwrapping a dozen Christmas broadcasting presents, from the past, to see what makes a classic BBC Christmas schedule. Our guest Ben Baker is a podcaster and author of festive books including the new Ben Baker's Christmas Box: 40 Years of the Best, Worst and Weirdest Christmas TV Ever (availab…
 
Viewed from the perspective of international trade, political complexity, and written culture, the late Bronze Age world of the Aegean and Near East marked a high point before the fall. But how did this world come into existence? The empires of the Hittites, Mittani, and Assyrians - along with Egypt’s New Kingdom - marked the beginning of something…
 
This episode looks at the very brief reign of Midzuha Wake and then beyond, at the rise of Ingyō Tennō and his wife, Ōnakatsu Hime (sometimes just referred to as Nakatsu Hime). We'll talk a little about disability, and delve a little bit more into the stories of succession. For more, check out the podcast page at https://www.sengokudaimyo.com/podca…
 
4. epizoda Sexuologie Ve čtvrtém díle se ohlížíme za vznikem sexuologie a soustředíme se na otázku, jak tato disciplína ovlivňovala a nadále ovlivňuje životy trans osob. Ačkoliv sexuologie na jednu stranu nabízela nová chápání trans prožitků, tyto prožitky často patologizovala a její spojitost s eugenikou vrhá stín na to, jaké vlastně byly její spo…
 
(image source: https://dinopedia.fandom.com/wiki/Incisivosaurus) Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Laura Owsley discuss Incisivosaurus, one of the dumbest looking dinosaurs, which is a crime, because dinosaurs are supposed to be cool. From the Early Cretaceous, this 12-foot oviraptorosaur was one of the only members in its family to have teeth,…
 
Democracy is a quintessential complex system: citizens’ decisions shape each other’s in nonlinear and often unpredictable ways; the emergent institutions exert top-down regulation on the individuals and orgs that live together in a polity; feedback loops and tipping points abound. And so perhaps it comes as no surprise in our times of turbulence an…
 
In this episode we conclude our series on the inquisition with the story of Joan of Arc with her three "trials:" 1. The Examination at Poitiers (link to a summary: https://www.jeanne-darc.info/trials-index/the-examination-at-poitiers/) 2. The 1431 Trial of Condemnation before the Inquisition (link to fulll transcripts: https://www.jeanne-darc.info/…
 
If we know the name of an ancient Near Eastern ruler, it’s probably that of Hammurabi, thanks to his famous Code. But Hammurabi was just one ruler in a time of conflict throughout the region, and the state he built in his lifetime didn’t last beyond his death. This was an age of fragmentation that lasted for centuries, where ambitious would-be conq…
 
(image source: https://bit.ly/3wKqJ8P) Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Stephen Curro discuss Gamerabaena, a turtle named after the Japanese movie monster that hasn’t fought Kong… at least not yet. From the Late Cretaceous, this 1.5-foot turtle had nothing noteworthy about it whatsoever other than its name, so naturally we have a lot of banter…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login