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Sasquatch Tracks

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Sasquatch Tracks

Micah Hanks, Dakota Waddell and Jeff Smith

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Sasquatch Tracks takes a scientific look at whether there are large animal species that remain undiscovered. With special emphasis on the Sasquatch in North America, the show looks at claims of apelike “relict hominoids” and other animals purported to exist in various parts of the world.
 
Indian Genes is committed to bringing in ideas and thoughts from Global leaders in their field to every listener and home, with the intention of providing free and easy access to this information to all that would want to continue their quest for continuous learning. We also are very focused on our young talent that would benefit from this exposure as they plan and move ahead in the careers and life path, hopefully inspiring them to greater heights and clarity in thought that builds both cha ...
 
The podcast of the Association for Psychological Science. What does science tell us about the way we think, behave, and learn about the world around us? Under the Cortex is supported by Macmillan Learning Psychology: In the classroom--whether in person or on screen-content matters. But not if students are disinterested, disengaged. At Macmillan Learning Psychology our authors are committed educators who know firsthand what teachers are facing today. That experience guides not only the books ...
 
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Vaccines to protect against COVID-19 are now widely available in the United States. But, wide availability doesn’t mean wide acceptance. Vaccine hesitancy and individuals who proudly claim they are anti-vax are not new phenomena. But why, with so much availability, do people resist vaccines so aggressively? What is the psychology behind this hesita…
 
On this edition of Sasquatch Tracks, the team is joined by Texas-based researcher Mike Mayes and UK podcaster and researcher Rick Minter for a discussion about the unusual appearances of large cats in various places, along with the relationship between the big cat mystery and the study of Sasquatch. A member of the North American Wood Ape Conservan…
 
Scientists agree that dogs evolved from wolves, but exactly how and when that happened is hotly contested. In this episode, Origin Stories contributor Neil Sandell examines the evolution of the relationship between dogs and humans, and explores the journey from wolf to dog. This story was originally produced for the CBC program IDEAS. Click here fo…
 
Pain is the body’s way of alerting the brain to injury and disease. Without a robust pain response, physical trauma could go unnoticed and untreated. Some people, however, experience chronic pain that lasts long after an injury has healed or has no easily identifiable cause. Unfortunately, treating chronic pain with over-the-counter and prescriptio…
 
Learn about the evolution of our extraordinary ability to cool ourselves down. Biological anthropologist Andrew Best discusses the past, present, and future of sweat in this special bonus episode. About our guest Dr. Andrew Best is a biological anthropologist at the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts who studies metabolism, endurance, and the ev…
 
Corporations, universities, and individuals have tried to find some magic formula to understand personalities and what characteristics and skills someone brings to the table. Over the years and across the globe, people have used handwriting analysis, phrenology—reading the bumps on the head—and even Ivy League diplomas to ascertain if someone has l…
 
In this exclusive episode Jonathan Mcdowell speaks to Indian Genes about Space Exploration & Its impact specifically Space Debris. The main-belt asteroid 4589 McDowell was named after him in 1993. Jonathan is an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He is a staff member at the Chandra X-ray Center. McDowell is the autho…
 
Though small in scale and sometimes unintended, microaggressions can negatively impact the well-being of individuals while reinforcing harmful stereotypes in society. Monnica Williams, a researcher at the University of Ottawa, discusses the study and impacts of microaggressions. The latest issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science is dedicated…
 
In this special episode of Under the Cortex, the entire APS communications team (Kim Armstrong, Charles Blue, Ludmila Nunes, and Leah Thayer) shares its top highlights from the September/October 2021 Issue of the Observer. We cover "Rain Before Rainbows, The Science of Transgender Flourishing," "Convicted by Memory, Exonerated by Science," "Psychol…
 
On this episode of Sasquatch Tracks, the fellows of the Appalachian Institute for Hominology Studies are joined by Josh Moss, a researcher who uses GIS data and mapping software to analyze the Sasquatch mystery. Josh's professional background is in environmental science and archaeology, but in recent years he began to turn his attention to the disc…
 
Jeffrey Hawkins speaks exclusively to Indian Genes, he is the American founder of Palm Computing and Handspring where he invented the PalmPilot and Treo, respectively. He has since turned to work on neuroscience full-time, founding the Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience (formerly the Redwood Neuroscience Institute) in 2002 and Numenta in 2…
 
Issues of gender equality, inclusion, and transgender rights have received a great deal of public and political attention. This includes laws restricting who can use which bathrooms, who has a right to compete in certain sports, and how gender is handled more broadly in our educational institutions and the workplace. Thekla Morgenroth with the Univ…
 
On this episode of Sasquatch Tracks, the team is joined by the legendary Thomas Steenburg, a veteran Canadian researcher who has devoted decades to the pursuit of North America's mysterious relict hominoid. Steenburg's journey began at a young age following his early fascination with Hammer horror films, although his very serious interest in the st…
 
Throughout the COVID pandemic, people have tried many things to help cope with their emotions and reduce the fear they feel. But that may not always be a good thing. If fear can motivate positive health behaviors, perhaps simple things like washing your hands, then could doing away with fear lead to less healthy behaviors? And, if so, are there bet…
 
Indian Genes talks exclusively to Alfred Mele, Alfred Remen Mele is an American philosopher and the William H. and Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy at Florida State University. He is also the past Director of the Philosophy and Science of Self-Control Project (2014-2017) and the Big Questions in Free Will Project (2010-2013). Mele is t…
 
What explains exceptional human performance? Does a focus on intensive specialized practice facilitate excellence, or is a multidisciplinary practice background better? Researchers investigated this question in sports and found that even when young competitors show tremendous promise in swimming, skateboarding, karate, or any other specialized spor…
 
On this installment of Sasquatch Tracks, after leading off with news and discussion of all things Sasquatch, we are then joined by Leon Thompson of Bigfoot Okanagan, a group that applies scientific principles toward the study of Sasquatch. Leon's background is in the study of systems theory, and over the course of the last several years, Leon has a…
 
Young children learn language at a pace far faster than teenagers or adults. One explanation for this learning advantage comes not from differences between children and adults, but from the differences in the way that people talk to children and adults. Researchers have developed a method to experimentally evaluate how parents use what they know ab…
 
Sometimes our eyes can deceive us, as shown by a perception-bending optical illusion involving a pair of lines, or sticks, of equal length. One stick, framed by open fins at each end, appears longer to our eyes than an equally long stick framed by closed fins. Even when we use our hands to estimate the lengths of the sticks, we are susceptible to t…
 
There is something intrinsically satisfying about crafting a handwritten thank-you letter or jotting down a thoughtful note to a friend or loved one. With the advent of electronic correspondence, handheld texting, and voice-recognition software, handwriting skills are becoming less commonplace and even old fashion. Apart from a seemingly less-perso…
 
Producer and scientist Kevin McLean travels to an island off the coast of Panama where researchers have found an isolated group of monkeys with a creative approach to surviving in a challenging environment. Links These tiny monkeys have entered their Stone Age with a bang First report of habitual stone tool use by Cebus monkeys Habitual Stone-Tool …
 
On this special edition of Sasquatch Tracks, we are joined by Shane Corson, an active researcher who is a member of the Olympic Project, an association of dedicated researchers, investigators, biologists and trackers committed to documenting the existence of Sasquatch. Shane joins us to discuss his own personal experience that led him to believe in…
 
Rachana Reddy talks to Indian Genes on the latest in Satellite technology and development with great insight into the Space industry and what the future holds instore. Rachana has some very valuable information for the private sector and also guides students that may be interested in this field, preparing them for what to expect and what would be e…
 
Despite increases in gender equality and the normalization of casual sex in many cultures, the belief that women who engage in casual sex have low self-esteem remains widespread. New research examines this entrenched stereotype and finds no significant correlation between a woman’s sexual behavior and her self-esteem. Professor Jaimie Arona Krems d…
 
At one point or another, you have had a song stuck in your head. These intrusive melodies, commonly called earworms, can sometimes provide amusement while other times they can be unrelenting annoyances. New research published in the journal Psychological Science reveals, however, that nighttime earworms can have a real negative impact on our qualit…
 
The widely-held idea known as the “obstetrical dilemma” is a hypothesis that explains why babies are so helpless, and why childbirth is so difficult for humans compared to other animals. The obstetrical dilemma suggests that babies are born early so their big brains can fit through the mother’s pelvis, which can’t get any wider due to our method of…
 
On this episode of Sasquatch Tracks, Jeff and Smoky lead off with an update about their recent investigations in a state park with a history of purported Sasquatch activity, and Micah reports on a number of items currently in the news, which includes a nighttime sighting by an Ohio woman who says she saw such a creature. We are then joined by resea…
 
APS's Ludmila Nunes and Charles Blue present their second sneak preview of the 2021 APS Virtual Convention. Day 1 was thrilling and Day 2 promises new insights and opportunities to hear from noted experts and researchers from around the world. Join us to learn more about the latest findings from the field of psychological science. Connect to the me…
 
APS's Charles Blue and Ludmila Nunes offer a sneak preview of day one of the 2021 APS Virtual Convention, May 26-27. They discuss engaging plenary talks and panel discussions as well as new offerings like hot topics and flash talks. Registration is still available and much of the content will be "on demand" so virtual attendees can enjoy it at thei…
 
On this episode of Sasquatch Tracks, after news and discussion about the latest happenings in the world of Sasquatchery, we are joined by Marine Biologist and former law enforcement and security specialist Bruce Champagne. Bruce has been involved with the investigation of relict hominoids and other cryptids for over forty years, and has been publis…
 
This is the first interview Space Hero has given to any media house in Asia and Indian Genes is really happy to be bringing this to you. If you are a Space enthusiast, an explore or just a curious mind this could be your opportunity to win Televisions biggest Prize..a trip to the International Space Station !! We continue to create history here...a…
 
Sleep is one of the defining traits of human life. It's also one of the most mysterious. Dr. Horacio de la Iglesia is a neurobiologist who's on a quest to understand how patterns of human sleep evolved. His new research shows an unexpected connection between sleep and the cycles of the moon. Send us your questions! Have a question about human evolu…
 
Conflicts driven by nationalism, ideologies, and cultures have become all too common. What can psychological science tell us about the causes and mental processes that push people from activism to radicalization? To shine some light on this topic, we hear from Kees van den Bos at the University of Utrecht, who is an expert on the study of radicaliz…
 
On this special edition of Sasquatch Tracks, the team is joined by researchers David Ellis and Julie Rench, who discuss their ongoing research with audio recordings of unknown provenance in various parts of the United States. Joining us to discuss this unique research, Julie brings us a remarkable selection of recordings she has made near the Uwhar…
 
Human brains can do more than simply imagine the presence of nonexistent objects. Our minds can automatically create well-defined representations of objects that are merely implied rather than seen, like the obstacles in a mime’s performance. These findings could aid in the development of artificial intelligence related to vision and navigation by …
 
Dr. Pandey, Director of India Operations for the Taksha Terrestrial Analog Research Center (TTARC), is the Head of Amity Space Centre and the Centre of Excellence in Astrobiology at Amity University, India. As a part of this, he is leading an initiative to establish India’s first centre that will work towards studying the origins and distribution o…
 
On this edition of Sasquatch Tracks, the team is joined by researcher and educator Amy Bue, Co-founder of Project Zoobook and member of the Olympic Project Bigfoot Research Team. Amy is also the head of Amy’s Bucket List Expeditions (ABLE), and a former investigator for the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization. A language arts teacher, writer, an…
 
What is it like to study an endangered species like chimpanzees, knowing they may go extinct within your lifetime? Leakey Foundation grantee Dr. Zarin Machanda is a co-director of the Kibale Chimpanzee Project, a long-term field study in Uganda. This study was started by primatologist Richard Wrangham in 1987, and project members have collected dai…
 
Many organizations present awards that recognize outstanding scientific achievement in a variety of disciplines, but these are typically given later in a scientist’s career. There are many scientists, however, who have made exceptional contributions and discoveries early in their careers. These researchers tend to be on the cutting edge of new and …
 
In 1924, a group of miners who had been prospecting near the southeast shoulder of Mount St. Helens, Washington, returned from the wilderness with a hair-raising story. The men claimed they had been attacked by "apemen", who bombarded their remote cabin with stones after firing their weapons at one of the creatures. Known today as the Ape Canyon in…
 
S2/EP4 - In this special episode, Indian Genes speaks exclusively to Mohini Jodhpurkar & Piyush Khopkar. Mohini Jodhpurkar- 1st year PhD student in Dr Jim Bell’s lab at Arizona State University. There, she serves a student collaborator on the Perseverance rover’s science team, specifically working with the MASTCAM-Z instrument onboard. Currently, s…
 
Past studies have demonstrated that opinions based on hard facts and data can remain constant for many years, but new research published in the journal Psychological Science reveals that attitudes based on feelings and emotions can also stand the test of time. Charles Blue interviews Matthew Rocklage and Andrew Luttrell, authors of the Psychologica…
 
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