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The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Joleen Cummings, a mother in Nassau County, Florida disappeared Mother's Day 2018. This is the story for the search of Joleen and the search for answers in one of Florida's most puzzling murder cases. This podcast is brought to you by investigative reporter Bridgette Matter at Action News Jax
 
Famous Mysteries Albert Jack is a collection of the world's most famous and puzzling mysteries. What really happened to the Mary Celeste? Who killed Marilyn Monroe? Where is Bigfoot? Could Aliens really exist? From crop circles to the Scottish lighthouse keepers who vanished one stormy night and from religious visions to the spine tingling tale of a restless family tomb, bestselling author Albert Jack has now turned his detective skills to the mysteries that have baffled so many over the yea ...
 
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show series
 
Researchers are aligning data on animal neuronal activity with behavioural information recorded on millisecond timescales, to uncover the signatures of internal brain states associated with things like moods and motivation. This is an audio version of our feature: Inside the mind of an animal See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informatio…
 
A conversation about the US election and the possible fallout for science, and are maternal behaviours learned or innate? In this episode: 00:46 US election In the United States the presidential race is underway, and Nature is closely watching to see what might happen for science. We speak to two of our US based reporters to get their insight on th…
 
How current and future ice loss in Greenland compares to the past, and using graphene to make ultra-sensitive radiation detectors. In this episode: 00:45 Greenland’s historic ice loss Climate change is accelerating the loss of ice and glaciers around the world leading to unprecedented levels of disappearance. Researchers have drilled samples from d…
 
Coaxing tiny colloid particles into a diamond structure, and manipulating cell death and homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease. In this episode: 00:45 Creating colloidal crystals For decades, researchers have attempted to create crystals with a diamond-like structure using tiny colloid particles. Now, a team thinks they’ve cracked it, which coul…
 
Mapping the migration of the Vikings, and the world’s smallest ultrasound device. In this episode: 00:45 Following the Viking footprint across Europe To better understand who the Vikings were, and where they went, researchers have mapped genomes from hundreds of archaeological artifacts. Research Article: Margaryan et al. 08:00 Coronapod Phase III …
 
Keeping electronics from overheating, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses. In this episode: 00:46 Cool computers Keeping components cool is a major hurdle when it comes to increasing electronic power. This week, we find out about a new way to integrate tiny microfluidic channels directly into circuits, to help keep them cool…
 
Engineering yeast to produce medicines, and the mechanism of anaesthetic action. In this episode: 00:44 Making medicine with yeast The tropane alkaloids are an important class of medicine, but they are produced agriculturally leaving them vulnerable to extreme weather and world events. Now, researchers have engineered yeast to produce these importa…
 
Protecting delicate quantum bits, and a competition to replicate findings from ancient computer code. In this episode: 01:04 Quantum computers vs ionizing radiation The quantum bits, or ‘qubits’, central to the operation of quantum computers are notoriously sensitive. Now, researchers have assessed the damaging effects that ionizing radiation can h…
 
A new way to produce aerogels opens up their use, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids. In this episode: 01:05 Printing aerogels Aerogels are materials with impressive insulating properties, but they’re difficult to handle, due to their innate fragility. Now, researchers have shown a new way to 3D print the most common …
 
Triggering swarming behaviour in locusts, and new insights into how humans synchronize. In this episode: 01:56 Understanding swarming behaviour Swarms of migratory locusts regularly devastate crops across the world, but why these swarms form has been a mystery. Now, a team of researchers have identified a compound that causes solitary locusts to co…
 
In 2015, after a nine-and-a-half-year journey, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft raced past Pluto, beaming images of the dwarf planet back to Earth. Five years after the mission, researchers are poring over images of Pluto’s far-side, which was shrouded in shadow during New Horizon’s flypast. They hope that these images will help give a better underst…
 
Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA. In this episode: 01:06 Stretching skin For decades it’s been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Ar…
 
New evidence may push back the date on human arrival to the Americas, and an examination of science’s flaws. In this episode: 00:59 Ancient Americans Two papers suggest that humans were present in the Americas thousands of years before many people have thought. We examine the evidence. Research Article: Ardelean et al.; Research Article: Becerra-Va…
 
Probing the superconducting properties of graphene and bacteria that can use manganese to grow. 01:15 Magic angle graphene If you sandwich two sheets of graphene together and twist one in just the right way, it can gain some superconducting properties. Now, physicists have added another material to this sandwich which stabilises that superconductiv…
 
In this episode: 01:47 Disaster in San Quentin San Quentin prison is facing a massive outbreak, we dig into how they got there. The crisis has arisen despite warnings from experts, and offers of free tests, which were declined. We ask why? And what can be done now? News: California's San Quentin prison declined free coronavirus tests and urgent adv…
 
On this week’s podcast, an ambitious Mars mission from a young space agency, and how crumbling up rocks could help fight climate change. In this episode: 00:46 Mars hopes In a few weeks the UAE’s first mission to Mars is due to launch. We speak to the mission leads to learn about the aims of the project, and how they developed the mission in under …
 
Next week, we’ll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show. In this episode: 02:15 Simulating pandemics Researchers have run numerous military-style simulations to predict the consequences of fictitious viral outbreaks. We discuss how these simulations work, what recommen…
 
On this week’s podcast, how the molecular structure of tooth enamel may impact decay, and a mysterious planetary core from a half-formed gas giant. In this episode: 00:46 Unravelling tooth enamel Researchers have been looking into the structure and composition of enamel in an effort to better understand tooth decay. Research Article: DeRocher et al…
 
In a few weeks, we’ll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show. In this episode: 03:13 What have we learnt? We take a look back over the past six months of the pandemic, and discuss how far the world has come. It’s been a period of turmoil and science has faced an unprec…
 
On this week’s podcast, life lessons from poker, and keeping things civil during peer review. In this episode: 00:44 Deciding to play poker When writer Maria Konnikova wanted to better understand the human decision making process, she took a rather unusual step: becoming a professional poker player. We delve into her journey and find out how poker …
 
In this episode: 00:37 Lessons from the Ebola outbreak We get an update on the pandemic response in the African countries still reeling from the 2014 Ebola crisis. Resource strapped and under pressure – can the lessons learned from Ebola help keep the coronavirus under control? 15:32 Dexamethasone, a breakthrough drug? A UK-based drugs trial sugges…
 
This week, researchers make diamonds tough, and evidence of incest in a 5,000 year old tomb. In this episode: 00:51 Tough versus hard Diamonds are famed for their hardness, but they are not so resistant to fracture. Now, researchers have toughened up diamonds, which could open up new industrial applications. Research Article: Yue et al. 06:07 Resea…
 
An instrument on the International Space Station is providing new insights into some of the Universe’s most baffling objects. Neutron stars have puzzled scientists for decades. It’s known that these ultra-dense objects are born from the remnants of supernovae, yet what’s under their surface, and what processes that go on within them, remain a myste…
 
In this episode: 00:52 Testing disparities As testing capacities increase, it is clear that not everyone has equal access. But grassroots organisations are trying to correct this inequity. We hear about one researcher’s fight to get testing to those below the poverty line in California. 09:04 The hydroxychloroquine saga continues As a high profile …
 
On the tenth of June, Nature will be joining #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives. We will be educating ourselves and defining actions we can take to help eradicate anti-Black racism in academia and STEM . Please join us. https://www.shutdownstem.com/ Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and change News: Thousands of scientists worldw…
 
In this episode: 00:45 Black Lives Matter The killing of George Floyd, a black man, by police in Minnesota has sent a shockwave of anger around the globe. As unrest continues, we discuss the protests in Washington DC and ask how scientists are reacting. 04:01 The outsized toll of covid-19 on people of colour Reports from around the globe are showin…
 
This week, a new method to grow hairy skin in a dish, and new research takes aim at the RNA world hypothesis. In this episode: 00:45 Hairy Skin Researchers may have developed a way to make skin that can grow hair in the lab, paving the way for treatment of a variety of skin disorders, and perhaps even baldness. Research Article: Lee et al.; News an…
 
00:59 Chloroquine on rocky ground President Trump's preferred coronavirus treatment is the focus of a new study suggesting it could cause more harm than good, but not everybody agrees. We discuss the fallout as trials around the world are paused and countries diverge over policy advice. News: India expands use of controversial coronavirus drug amid…
 
This week, perfecting catalysts that split water using light, and the mystery of missing matter in the Universe. In this episode: 00:44 Water splitting After decades of research scientists have managed to achieve near perfect efficiency using a light-activated catalyst to separate hydrogen from water for fuel. Research Article: Takata et al.; News …
 
01:38 Trump vs the WHO President Trump has given the WHO an ultimatum in a tweet, threatening to pull out of the organisation within 30 days unless unclear demands are met. We discuss what this means for the pandemic, the USA and the future of international health cooperation. 12:06 Where are we with vaccines? The first results from vaccine trials …
 
This week, crafting an artificial eye with the benefits of a human's, and understanding how disk-galaxies formed by peering back in time. In this episode: 00:45 Biomimetic eye Researchers fabricate an artificial eye complete with a human-like retina. Research Article: Gu et al.; News and Views: Artificial eye boosted by hemispherical retina 09:27 R…
 
With questionable coronavirus content flooding airwaves and online channels, what’s being done to limit its impact? In this episode: 00:57 The epidemiology of misinformation As the pandemic spreads, so does a tidal wave of misinformation and conspiracy theories. We discuss how researchers' are tracking the spread of questionable content, and ways t…
 
This week, Elisabeth Bik tells us about her work uncovering potential image manipulation, and a new route for particulate pollution formation. In this episode: 00:45 Seeing double Elisabeth Bik spends her days identifying duplicated images in science papers. She tells us about her efforts, and why they’re important. Feature: Meet this super-spotter…
 
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