show episodes
 
Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
Project Nova is an original science fiction audio drama podcast created by Aaron Sarka and produced by Evil Kitten Productions. This fully produced audio drama follows the four subjects of a secret scientific experiment as they awaken to find themselves as the subjects of the mysterious Project Nova.
 
There are a lot of fads, blogs and strong opinions, but then there’s SCIENCE. Science Vs is the show from Gimlet that finds out what’s fact, what’s not, and what’s somewhere in between. We do the hard work of sifting through all the science so you don't have to and cover everything from 5G and Pandemics, to Vaping and Fasting Diets.
 
A podcast for the bold and curious to help you navigate our world's accelerating weirdness — about science and the philosophy of it, prehistory and post-humanity and deep time, non-human agency and non-duality, science fiction and the stories we regard as real, complex systems and sustainability (or lack thereof), psychedelics as a form of training for a weirding present and proliferating futures, art and creativity as service and as inquiry. Join paleontologist-futurist Michael Garfield eve ...
 
New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Maddie Sofia for science on a different wavelength.
 
Neuroscience stories from the lab and life: By scientists, for everyone. Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) researchers Ben Scholl, Ph.D., Joe Schumacher, Ph.D., Jeremy Chang, Ph.D, and Misha Smirnov, Ph.D. host Neurotransmissions: an engaging, accessible look inside the neuroscience research world, exploring current research topics and emerging technologies, public health issues in the domain of biomedical science, the intersection between science and society, and unique p ...
 
The Leviathan Chronicles is a full cast audio drama about a race of immortals that have been secretly living in a hidden city called Leviathan, deep under the Pacific Ocean. For centuries, the utopian society has existed in peace, gently influencing world events on the surface. But soon, a civil war erupts between the immortals that wish to stay hidden, and those that want to integrate fully with the rest of mankind on the surface. A clandestine division of the CIA known as Blackdoor discove ...
 
What can you expect from TGP Nominal? Space, Science, Astronomy & Technology news, along side news from the world of Sci-Fi, whether it be on the big screen, small screen or in print, we will cover it. We hope to bring you guests from the Space, Science, Astronomy, Technology & Sci-Fi community to help "Edutain" our listeners. We also aim to bring you content from places of interest & social events related to Space, Science, Astronomy, Technology & Sci-Fi. From The National Space Centre to M ...
 
Join our community of remarkable people working on the world's biggest problems and opportunities. Our 3-time Webby-nominee dives into the brains of the world's smartest people -- scientists, doctors, CEO's, farmers, and more -- to provide Action Steps you can take to fight for a better future -- for everyone. Get deep context on clean energy and coral reefs, COVID vaccines anbd pediatric cancer research, clean water and carbon capture tech, asteroid deflection and artificial intelligence et ...
 
When Carly Parker’s friend Yumiko goes missing under very mysterious circumstances, Carly’s search for her friend leads her headfirst into a ancient mysterious game known only as Rabbits. Soon Carly begins to suspect that Rabbits is much more than just a game, and that the key to understanding Rabbits, might be the key to the survival of our species, and the Universe as we know it.
 
There’s a line between possible and impossible, a wall we can’t break through or tear down. But what if we could climb to the top and take a look at the other side? What if the line between fiction and reality was just a little blurrier, and our world a little stranger? Join Jeramy, Jack, and Ryan as they look at twists on our reality and ignore the difference between what can and cannot be to ask, “What If…?”.
 
Crypto-Z is a cinematic sci-fi audio drama. Join Jane Silver’s mission to restore life on the planet, as she ascends the Alps to discover the mesmerizing yet menacing “Iceman”. Created by Hadrien Royo and Danielle Trussoni. TEXT (646) 229-3423 to join us or visit www.euphonie.media
 
Edited by bestselling anthologist John Joseph Adams, LIGHTSPEED is a Hugo Award-winning, critically-acclaimed digital magazine. In its pages, you'll find science fiction from near-future stories and sociological SF to far-future, star-spanning SF. Plus there's fantasy from epic sword-and-sorcery and contemporary urban tales to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folk tales. Each month, LIGHTSPEED brings you a mix of originals and reprints featuring a variety of authors, from the bestseller ...
 
Leaving Earth and its problems behind seemed ideal, but no one anticipated just how difficult colonizing Mars would be. Marsfall follows some of the earliest colonists to settle on Mars in the year 2047, and each episode continues the story from a different character’s perspective. Led by their fearless commander Jacki O’Rania, and assisted by the artificial intelligence unit ANDI, they strive to make a home on the Red Planet while exploring its deeper mysteries.
 
When six alien celebrities are trapped onboard a space station, they will have to work together to survive--or die at the hands of an unknown monster. Welcome to DINING IN THE VOID. For full credits and to check out transcripts for each episode, visit our website: https://zebulonpodcasts.wixsite.com/main/ditv Sound Effects Courtesy of freesound.org (Some sound effects are licensed under CC by 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Other sound effects are licensed under CC0. Some ...
 
At the Penumbra, you might follow Juno Steel, a brooding, sharp-witted private eye on Mars, as he tangles with an elusive homme fatale, tracks dangerous artifacts of an ancient alien civilization, and faces his three greatest fears: heights, blood, and relationships. Or you might enter the world of the Second Citadel, where the merciless Sir Caroline must corral a team of emotionally distraught all-male knights to defend their city against mind-manipulating monsters...even the ones they’ve f ...
 
Welcome to Offworld, a new show from the Tested network that explores the fun places where space and pop culture intersect! In each episode, host Ariel Waldman is joined by guests from the space and science community to examine a science fiction story and discuss how it holds up under some scientific scrutiny.
 
Science fiction author David Barr Kirtley talks geek culture with guests such as Neil Gaiman (#253), George R. R. Martin (#22), Richard Dawkins (#46), Wil Wheaton (#398), Bill Nye (#273), Margaret Atwood (#94), Neil deGrasse Tyson (#32), and Ursula K. Le Guin (#65). Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy has appeared on recommended podcast lists from NPR, The Guardian, The A.V. Club, BBC America, CBC Radio, WVXU, io9, Omni, The Strand, Library Journal, and Popular Mechanics. CBC Radio writes, "You may n ...
 
Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916) was born Mary Everest in England and spent her early years in France. She married mathematician George Boole. She was the author of several works on teaching and teaching mathematics in particular. This short book, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, is meant to be read by children and introduces algebra and logic. She uses the word “algebra” broadly, defining it as a “method of solving problems by honest confession of one’s ignorance”. Using this definition, Boole ...
 
Originally serialized from 1898 to 1903, Wells later made some crucial changes to the piece to create a flawless dystopian science fiction novel published in 1910 and renamed The Sleeper Awakes. The novel focuses on an Englishman, who falls in a deep sleep lasting two centuries, and sees him wake up in an unrecognizable setting and extremely wealthy. An enthralling tale of dystopian society depicted through a colorful imagination, The Sleeper Awakes concentrates on topics including dystopia, ...
 
Tides is the story of Dr. Winifred Eurus, a xenobiologist trapped on an unfamiliar planet with hostile tidal forces. She must use her wits, sarcasm and intellectual curiosity to survive long enough to be rescued. But there might be more to life on this planet than she expected. . .
 
The Alien Adventures of Finn Caspian is a serialized science-fiction story for kids (start with Episode 1), told in 15-20 minute episodes for parents to put on when driving around town, or to marathon on road trips, or to bond over before bed. The story centers on Finn Caspian, an 8-year-old boy aboard The Famous Marlowe 280 Interplanetary Exploratory Space Station. He and his friends Abigail, Elias and Vale are Explorers Troop 301, taking off from the Marlowe to explore uncharted planets, h ...
 
Explore the meaning of science fiction, and how it's relevant to real-life science and society. Your hosts are Annalee Newitz, a science journalist who writes science fiction, and Charlie Jane Anders, a science fiction writer who is obsessed with science. Every two weeks, we take deep dives into science fiction books, movies, television, and comics that will expand your mind -- and maybe change your life
 
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show series
 
It has become increasingly clear to your guidebook writers that the beauty of any destination should be measured not simply by the magnificence of its architecture or the lushness of its landscape, but by the splendor that its citizens collectively produce. In cities where mayors make sure flowers are planted every spring and the baker sends us off…
 
Luke talks to Juliane about the best book he’s read this year: The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson. Get this audiobook for free, or any of 100,000 other titles, as part of a free trial by visiting this link: https://www.audibletrial.com/sfbrp. Buy this book at , or discuss this book at Goodreads.com Luke blogs at: https://www.lukeburrage.co…
 
Today we are joined by Fiona Greenland, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia, to talk about her new book, Ruling Culture: Art Police, Tomb Raiders, and the Rise of Cultural Power in Italy (University of Chicago Press, 2021). Through much of its history, Italy was Europe’s heart of the arts, an artistic playground for forei…
 
It's time to talk about the politics of kaiju. With the new Godzilla vs. Kong movie stomping our way soon, we're discussing the long history of giant monsters in pop culture, and the truly strange cinematic backstory of the original King Kong vs. Godzilla flick. What do kaiju represent, and why are they connected to nationalism? And when does a kai…
 
People talk about character and plot and climax, but no one covers how novel structure is needed to put it all together. SPOILERS for A Song of Ice and Fire Series and the Broken Earth Series by N.K. Jemisin. Get the extended version of this podcast via Patreon! February 18, 2021 | Season 17 Ep 14 (Ep 565) | murverse.com | Copyright 2005-2021, Mur …
 
Kaitland Byrd’s new book Real Southern Barbecue: Constructing Authenticity in Southern Food Culture (Lexington Press, 2019) examines an archive of oral histories collected by the Southern Foodways Alliance featuring the voices of barbecue pit masters and restaurant owners from the South. Byrd argues that barbecue as a cultural product has a unique …
 
Humans have found many ways to divide and stratify—by skin color, ancestry, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, health status, body type or size, and so on. The list is so long that it’s hard to imagine it getting longer, and yet debut author Chris Panatier has found a way. In The Phlebotomist (Angry Robot, 2020)t, society is di…
 
In 1935, the writer Baburao Patel writes the following about Bombay’s film industry: “In India, with financing conditions still precarious, the professional film distributor thrives. . . . He comes with a fortune made in share and cotton gambling, advances money to the producer at a killing rate of interest plus a big slice of royalty and recovers …
 
Would your dog eat you if you died? What are face mites? Why do clowns creep us out? In this illuminating collection of grisly true science stories, journalist Erika Engelhaupt, the writer of National Geographic’s highly acclaimed Gory Details blog, shares the answers to these questions and many more. Gory Details: Adventures from the Dark Side of …
 
Maybe the People Would Be the Times (Verse Chorus Press, 2020) could be described as a memoir in essay form. Collecting pieces from the past two decades, this book covers Luc Sante's childhood as an immigrant from Belgium, his engagement with the downtown arts scene that gave rise to punk, and the eventual downfall of a version of New York that may…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@…
 
Lori Cox Han and Caroline Heldman, both scholars of gender and politics as well as scholars of the American Presidency, have assembled a wide array of essays[*] to revisit the question about whether “we” are ready for the first female president of the United States, and what the path might look like to arrive at that glass-ceiling shattering event.…
 
Today I talked to Candacy Taylor about her book Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America (Abrams Press, 2020). Taylor is an award-winning author, photographer and cultural documentarian. She’s been a fellow at Harvard University under the direction of Henry Louis Gates Jr. and her projects have been funded by org…
 
As a Thai-Australian woman artist, Phaptawan Suwannakudt has long battled prejudice and discrimination relating to her gender. This disappointment with society’s dictates features at the heart of Phaptawan’s artistic practice. Spanning more than four decades, Phaptawan’s rich body of work includes paintings, sculptures and installations, informed b…
 
Dispute over land and kingdom may lie at the heart of this story of war between cousins the Pandavas and the Kouravas but the Mahabharata is about conflicts of dharma. These conflicts are immense and various, singular and commonplace. Throughout the epic, characters face them with no clear indications of what is right and what is wrong; there are n…
 
Many students of psychology, business, nursing and other disciplines are taught about "Maslow's pyramid of human needs", a diagram that shows a progression from our basic needs, such as food and shelter, to higher, social needs and, eventually, to striving for often intangible life goals and fulfilment. The pyramid is an iconic image, yet Abraham M…
 
It's likely there's a magnet wherever you're looking right now. In fact, the device you're using to listen to this episode? Also uses a magnet. Which is why today, NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel is taking us "back to school," explaining how magnetism works and why magnets deserve more respect. If you're secretly hoping we cover a basic sc…
 
Founded in 1935 by a young publisher disillusioned with the class prejudices of the interwar publishing trade, Penguin Books set out to make good books available to all. The 'Penguin Specials', a series of current affairs books authored by leading intellectuals and politicians, embodied its democratising mission. Published over fifty years and ofte…
 
Chelsea Szendi Schieder’s Co-Ed Revolution: The Female Student in the Japanese New Left and Naoko Koda’s The United States and the Japanese Student Movement, 1948-1973: Managing a Free World provide new insights into the postwar Japanese student movement. Koda, a scholar of diplomatic history and international relations, situates student activism w…
 
Suyoung Son’s book Writing for Print: Publishing and the Making of Textual Authority in Late Imperial China (Harvard UP, 2018) examines the widespread practice of self-publishing by writers in late imperial China, focusing on the relationships between manuscript tradition and print convention, peer patronage and popular fame, and gift exchange and …
 
Listen to this interview of Shyam Sharma, Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at Stony Brook University. We talk about how mutually appreciative attitudes advance Writing in the Disciplines, about how other languages matter to writing in English, and about how US Presidents have changed the wa…
 
With over 100 million followers, Buddhism in the People's Republic of China now fosters the largest community in the world of individuals who self-identify as Buddhists. Although Buddhism was harshly persecuted during the Cultural Revolution under the leadership of Mao Zedong, Buddhist communities around the country were able to revive their tradit…
 
Based on a viral article, the gripping medical mystery story of Ron Davis, a world-class Stanford geneticist who has put his career on the line to find the cure for chronic fatigue syndrome, the disease killing his son. For the past six years, Whitney Dafoe has been confined to a bedroom in the back of his parents' home, unable to walk, to eat, to …
 
When John Foster Dulles died in 1959, he was given the largest American state funeral since Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s in 1945. President Eisenhower called Dulles—his longtime secretary of state—“one of the truly great men of our time,” and a few years later the new commercial airport outside Washington, DC, was christened the Dulles International…
 
The remarkable life of history's first foreign-born samurai and his astonishing journey from Northern Africa to the heights of Japanese society. When Yasuke arrived in Japan in the late 1500s, he had already traveled much of the known world. Kidnapped as a child, and trained into a boy soldier in India, he had ended up an indentured servant and bod…
 
The medium of cinema emerged during the height of Victorian-era European empires, and as a result, settler colonial imperialism has thematically suffused film for well over a century. In Cinematic Settlers: The Settler Colonial World on Film (Routledge, 2020), Drs. Janne Lahti (Academy of Finland Fellow in history, University of Helsinki) and Rebec…
 
It’s hard to avoid innovation these days. Nearly every product gets marketed as being disruptive, whether it’s genuinely a new invention or just a new toothbrush. But in this manifesto on the state of American work, historians of technology Lee Vinsel and Andrew L. Russell argue that our way of thinking about and pursuing innovation has made us poo…
 
This week, I embark on a new experiment and respond to three "advice column" questions from the Future Fossils listening audience: • How do I know if aliens would like my music? • How do I talk to my five-year-old about death? • How do I be creative without training or experience? This was a lot of fun and I'll definitely do this again. Enjoy, and …
 
How can quantitative methods help us understand how the brain works? On this episode Joe, Jeremy, and Alex are joined by Dr. Peter Dayan the director of the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany. They'll discuss the different computational approaches taken to understand how the brain works, Dr. Dayan's own work using …
 
This bonus episode is to tell you about a new science podcast from Stitcher called If/Then! Check it out. We think you'll like it. What gets you curious? Virtual experiences, celestial bodies, water worlds or maybe just the tiniest mysteries inside your brain? The endlessly curious and curiously funny, Gillian Jacobs (Community, Netflix's LOVE) and…
 
James West has been a curious tinkerer since he was a child, always wondering how things worked. Throughout his long career in STEM, he's also been an advocate for diversity and inclusion — from co-founding the Association for Black Laboratory Employees in 1970 to his work today with The Ingenuity Project, a non-profit that cultivates math and scie…
 
The familiar story of Soviet power in Cold War Eastern Europe focuses on political repression and military force. But in Empire of Friends: Soviet Power and Socialist Internationalism in Cold War Czechoslovakia (Cornell University Press, 2019), Rachel Applebaum shows how the Soviet Union simultaneously promoted a policy of transnational friendship …
 
Although physicians during World War I, and scholars since, have addressed the idea of disorders such as shell shock as inchoate flights into sickness by men unwilling to cope with war's privations, they have given little attention to the agency many soldiers actually possessed to express dissent in a system that medicalized it. In Germany, these m…
 
In this episode of New Books in Literary Studies, Miranda Corcoran speaks to Ulrich Baer and Smaran Dayal about their unique anthology, Fictions of America: The Book of Firsts (Warbler Press, 2020). An expansive collection of literary firsts, Fictions of America brings together works that broke boundaries, sparked new movements and changed how we t…
 
Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound (Harvard University Press, 2021) by Dr. Daphne Brooks is a lyrical masterpiece that takes readers on an exhilarating journey through a century of Black sound from Bessie Smith to Beyoncé. In writing alongside the sistas who cared for Black women's musicianship like Paulin…
 
In Women's War: Fighting and Surviving the Civil War (Harvard UP, 2019), the award-winning author of Confederate Reckoning challenges the idea that women are outside of war, through a trio of dramatic stories revealing women's transformative role in the American Civil War. We think of war as a man's world, but women have always played active roles …
 
Enter the remarkable untold love story of Charles and Susie Spurgeon. Charles Spurgeon is esteemed for his writing, preaching, and passion for the Lord. But behind the great man was a great wife—and between the man and wife was a profound marriage. Yours, Till Heaven: The Untold Love Story of Charles and Susie Spurgeon (Moody Publishers, 2021) invi…
 
Heather Bell Adams’ first novel, Maranatha Road (West Virginia University Press 2017), won the gold medal for the Southeast region in the Independent Publisher Book Awards and was selected for Deep South Magazine’s Fall/Winter Reading List. Her short fiction, which has won the James Still Fiction Prize and Carrie McCray Memorial Literary Award, app…
 
Synopsis: Where does America keep paying clean up costs, instead of doubling down on prevention? Do Better Better essays help you build mental models and ask questions about our changing world — for yourself, your family, and your business. These essays compliment the audio version of our weekly newsletter, and of course, our ground-breaking conver…
 
On January 6th, 2021, when right wing supporters of Donald Trump staged an insurrection at the US Capitol building, they were participating in a long tradition of conservative rebellion with its roots in the West. Dr. James Skillen, associate professor of environmental studies at Calvin University, traces those roots in his new book, This Land is M…
 
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