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How do we meet the challenges we face as organizations, countries, or even as a species? Whether we’re locked in fierce corporate competition or struggling with matters of life and death, one constant stands out: teams working together. And when teams, and teams of teams, focus on combining their unique abilities, expertise, and experience to embrace uncertainty, innovate, and tackle massive challenges? No problem is unsolvable. Teamistry is all about the chemistry that exists between groups ...
 
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show series
 
In the summer of 2018, 12 Thai teenagers and their 25-year-old soccer coach got stuck deep inside the labyrinthine – and flooding – Tham Luang caves of Thailand’s Chiang Rai province. In this episode of Teamistry, host Gabriela Cowperthwaite takes us inside the caves and alongside the people assembled from across Thailand and the world to work toge…
 
Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, Iceland had become the worst-hit country in Scandinavia. But it reversed its fate, without a full lockdown. And to date, Iceland has seen very few deaths. How? Largely because of the harmonious collaboration of "The Trinity" – Iceland’s chief epidemiologist, Director of Health, and superintendent of police – who impl…
 
The War to End All Wars didn't do what it said on the box and political and economic pressures to fascist all over Europe, China and the Pacific led to another protracted period of bloodshed and barbarism. This episode is short and short on Antarctic content but it's important to understand the motives and outcomes of the morass of conflicts we cam…
 
When Neil Armstrong stepped on the moon for the first time, we don't actually see his face. We see his moonsuit. That moonsuit — in effect — is Neil Armstrong; an inseparable part of this historic moment. While the spacesuit kept him alive to tell that story in his own words, what went unnoticed is the extraordinary team that stitched it together. …
 
Driven south by the Third Reich's thirst for fat, the Schwabenland (ship version) carries two cool flying boats and a load of fucking nazis to Antarctic shores. No house keeping and no calls to action, this episode, because I hate nazis and writing, recording and editing this episode made me grumpy. Given that I parted brass rags with Quark expedit…
 
Sir Ernest Shackleton wanted to be the first man to walk across the Antarctic continent. In 1914, with a crew of 28 men, he set sail on the Endurance to complete the first “Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition." But harsh winds and frigid temperatures threatened the voyage from the start, and in short order the ship was marooned thousands of miles a…
 
On March 11, 2011 Japan was struck by a 9.1-magnitude earthquake, the most powerful in the country's recorded history. But the real horror had only just begun. A 14-meter-high tsunami created by the seismic event followed, sending giant waves of seawater crashing into the the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, triggering a nuclear disaster. Whi…
 
I've traveled with Santiago for three austral summers and his humour and humanity have buoyed my moods while his perspectives on the birds we encountered opened my eyes to biological vistas I'd previously not spotted due to my focus on the mud. I only just met John Marsden ten minutes before pressing record but his tales of high latitudes aviation …
 
Lincoln Ellsworth's money returns to Antarctica with new pilots, no meteorologist and Norwegians all but ready to throttle him. Job's a good 'un, though, in spite of the lack of oomph, patience and skill the money bags brought with him. Herbert Hollick-Kenyon nails one of the best put downs in Antarctic history while puffing on his pipe, munching o…
 
Ellsworth's money gets it into its head to be the first to cross Antarctica. Wilkins, Balchen, Braathen and another polar pig get tangled up in his weak sauce Ahab routine. Soundscapes featuring Port Circumcision and the waters just off Two Hummock Island, which I'm sure is the British Hydrographic Office's cleaned up label for a rude sailor name o…
 
Two interviews with three fellow Drake Passage crossers and a thunder accompanied decompression after recent upheavals. Anyone who feels hard done by in the third act is welcome to a right of reply. Also putting out my shingle via Patreon once more. https://www.patreon.com/Ice_Coffee outlines what's on offer in return for financial support but I wo…
 
In an epic episode spanning an hour and a half and featuring a singing leopard seal, blowing humpbacks and the tuneless honking of the penguins the residents of Little America and Bolling Advance Base and the various dog and half-track teams reconvene and get out of Dodge aboard the Jacob Ruppert and the Bear.…
 
Boom! Two episodes in two days. Take that, incomprehensible download statistics. Let's see me make sense of you now. Byrd returns south to finish... something... something brave and stirring and laudably scientific and humanitarian, no doubt. Prolly work it out in payroll. Or in a post-hoc rationalisation that will remain in publication for half a …
 
Jeff Maynard returns to the dive hut to discuss the non-voyage of the Nautilus and we receive a visitation from the ghost of an Antarctic feline. Then the sustained influence of James Wordie and the efforts of Gino Watkins get some attention to set the scene for further British efforts in the south. Oooh, foreshadowing and ghosts. Woooooooooooo!…
 
Sam Edmonds is good company at high and low latitudes but you'll know that for yourself by the end of the interview, conducted north of Sydney with sulphur crested cockatoo and DeHavilland Canada Beaver accompaniment. Much has been written on high latitudes food but the residues receive less attention. After finding out about Antarctic sewage and s…
 
The world didn't stand still and await the outcomes of Wilkins' and Byrd's efforts with bated breath. This episode catches you up on Antarctic pertinent developments that the buzz caused by the aviators eclipsed. The episode also features an interview I recorded with Dr Andrew Atkin while I was in Sydney. Yes, if you get in touch and tell me you li…
 
Victor and I spent time in the Zodiacs around the Antarctic Peninsula in late 2018. This unassuming man quickly demonstrated a tremendous experience in and love of Antarctica and cherished the opportunities our work offered him. I sat down with Victor to record a brief history of his Antarctic career after one of the presentations he gave to our te…
 
Byrd and Wilkins are done in Antarctica for the 1920s and head north, leaving many loose ends in the snow next to the dog corpses. With the depression changing the playing field it would fall to the primo fund raisers and the independently wealthy to pick those loose ends up in the 1930s but I'll get to that after covering some Australian and Norwe…
 
Sly grogging among a large company of over winterers makes Byrd's winter on The Barrier a very different experience to that of previous expeditions. I set up a paypal account for anyone who wants to support the series. You can flick me some bucks for books, hosting services and travel expenses at https://www.paypal.me/icecoffeepodcast…
 
The final full episode arising from my trip to Hobart. Ron Hann, Peter Reid and Rob Nash speak about their time in Antarctica and I bloviate about my favourite podcasts. Ah, narrowcasting, you path to digression, you. I'm hoping the next time you'll hear from me I'll be speaking about November 1928 events at Deception Island at Deception Island in …
 
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