show episodes
 
The true science behind our most popular urban legends. Historical mysteries, paranormal claims, popular science myths, aliens and UFO reports, conspiracy theories, and worthless alternative medicine schemes... Skeptoid has you covered. From the sublime to the startling, no topic is sacred. Weekly since 2006.
 
A podcast dedicated to the history of Persia, and the great empires that ruled there beginning with the Achaemenid Empire of Cyrus the Great and the foundation of an imperial legacy that directly impacted ancient civilizations from Rome to China, and everywhere in between. Join me as we explore the cultures, militaries, religions, successes, and failures of some of the greatest empires of the ancient world. All credits available on the website (https://historyofpersiapodcast.com/) Support th ...
 
The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
 
Future Ecologies is a podcast about relationships: between, within, amongst, and all around us. Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, every episode is an invitation to see the world in a new light – set to original music & immersive soundscapes, and weaving together interviews with expert knowledge holders.
 
Undeniable power. Unbelievable stories. Unlikely origins. Kingpins follows the rise and fall of rulers of the underworld. Every Friday, we examine the leaders of organized crime rings, and how money and power corrupted and changed their communities. What makes a kingpin or queenpin, and how can we stop them? Kingpins is part of the Parcast Network, and a production of Cutler Media. New episodes release on Fridays.
 
Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
 
Welcome to The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman, where we give you insights into the mind, brain, behavior and creativity. Each episode we’ll feature a guest who will stimulate your mind, and give you a greater understanding of your self, others, and the world we live in. Hopefully, we’ll also provide a glimpse into human possibility! Thanks for listening and enjoy the podcast. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-psychology-podcast/support
 
There’s a reason the History Channel has produced hundreds of documentaries about Hitler but only a few about Dwight D. Eisenhower. Bad guys (and gals) are eternally fascinating. Behind the Bastards dives in past the Cliffs Notes of the worst humans in history and exposes the bizarre realities of their lives. Listeners will learn about the young adult novels that helped Hitler form his monstrous ideology, the founder of Blackwater’s insane quest to build his own Air Force, the bizarre lives ...
 
Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
This podcast is about strange medicine. I will use my experience as an ER nurse to explore the world of medicine. True Crime, coroners cases, medical mysteries, bizarre treatments from around the world, scary diseases and medical breakthroughs. Real life stories from the Emergency Room. Sometimes it's the cure that kills you!
 
A podcast dedicated to all things quantitative, ranging from the relevant to the highly irrelevant. Co-hosts Patrick Curran and Greg Hancock talk about serious statistical topics, but without taking themselves too seriously. Think: CarTalk hi-jacked by the two grumpy old guys from the Muppets, grousing about quantitative methods, statistics, and data analysis, all presented to you with the production value of a 6th grade school project. But in a good way.
 
Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.
 
The Podcast from Australia for Science and Reason. Join Richard Saunders and his team of reporters for your weekly dose of skeptical news and interviews, reports and comments. Past guests have included, James Randi, Stephen Fry, Tim Minchin, Eugenie Scott, Dr Phil Plait, Michael Marshall, Dr Steve Novella, Dr Pamela Gay, Jon Ronson, Dr Ben Goldacre, Simon Singh, Prof. Richard Wiseman, Dick Smith, Banachek, Prof. Chris French, George Hrab, Tim Ferguson, Dr Paul Willis and many, many more. Fea ...
 
The History of the Cold War Podcast will cover the Cold War from the period of roughly 1945 to 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in bi-monthly instalments on the first and fifteenth. This Podcast will examine the Cold War from a number of different perspectives including political, diplomatic, cultural, ideological etc. This series is intended to be a grand narrative of the conflict exploring it from its early origins to its final moments and its effects on the world today. Please join u ...
 
Brains On!® is a science podcast for curious kids and adults from American Public Media. Each week, a different kid co-host joins Molly Bloom to find answers to fascinating questions about the world sent in by listeners. Like, do dogs know they’re dogs? Or, why do feet stink? Plus, we have mystery sounds for you to guess, songs for you to dance to, and lots of facts -- all checked by experts.
 
Cosmopod is the official podcast of Cosmonaut Magazine, a project dedicated to expanding the project of scientific socialism in the 21st Century. In our feed we have a combination of podcast episodes and audio articles from our website.
 
Tune in to the Always Already Podcast for indulgent conversations about critical theory (in the broadest read of the term!). Our podcast consists of two episode streams. The first is a discussion of texts spanning critical theory, political theory, social theory, and philosophy. We work through and analyze main ideas, underlying assumptions, connections with other texts and theories, and occasionally delve into the great abyss of free association, ad hoc theory jokes, and makeshift puns. The ...
 
Bill Nye is on a mission to change the world — one voicemail at a time. Bill and science writer Corey S. Powell take your burning questions and put them to the world's leading experts on just about every topic in the universe. Should you stop eating cheeseburgers to combat climate change? Could alien life be swimming inside the moons of Jupiter and Saturn? Does your pet parakeet learn to sing the way that you learned to speak? Bill, Corey, and their special guests will answer those questions ...
 
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show series
 
"That’s such a hard question,” Gina Neff, a sociologist at the Oxford Internet Institute, responds when asked what social science research or thinker most influenced her. “It’s like a busman’s holiday for an academic, because so many things have influenced my thinking.” Her answer, by the way, was Ulrich Beck’s concept of the risk society, as expla…
 
Hello Everyone, and welcome to New Books in Gender and Sexuality, a channel on the New Books Network. I’m your host, Jana Byars, and I’m here today with Pallavi Guha, assistant professor in the Department of Mass Communication at Towson University in Towson, MD, to talk to her about her new book, Hear #MeToo in India: News, Social Media, and Anti-R…
 
In The Other Side of the Coin: Public Opinion toward Social Tax Expenditures (Russell Sage Foundation, 2021), political scientists Christopher Ellis and Christopher Faricy examine public opinion towards social tax expenditures—the other side of the American social welfare state—and their potential to expand support for such social investment. Tax e…
 
Vantablack is a pigment that reaches a level of darkness that’s so intense, it’s kind of upsetting. It’s so black it’s like looking at a hole cut out of the universe. If it looks unreal, it’s because Vantablack isn’t actually a color, it’s a form of nanotechnology. It was created by the tech industry for the tech industry, but this strange dark mat…
 
Join rapper and author Propaganda as he uses his hood-knowledge to break down the political scene on the podcast Hood Politics. All the jokes. All the political tea. All the goodness. If you like what you heard, make sure to find Hood politics with Prop in your podcast player. Subscribe and follow so you don't miss an episode! Learn more about your…
 
In recent years, research on the power of growth mindset has made the leap from the psychology lab to popular culture. Growth mindset is the belief that a person’s intelligence and abilities can grow and improve with practice, and researchers have found that brief exercises that increase growth mindset can help keep students motivated when they fac…
 
On this day in 1910, Nobel-prize winning chemist Dorothy Hodgkin was born. / On this day in 1941, civil engineer and inventor Konrad Zuse, who worked in Nazi Germany, unveiled the first full functional, programmable computer. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Practice: A Comparative Analysis of the Role of Courts (Oxford UP, 2018) brings together an extraordinary collection of data and analysis which concerns how domestic courts interpret and apply the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It is the first thorough comparati…
 
Christine M. Philliou's Turkey: A Past Against History (University of California Press, 2021) challenges conventional understandings about the transition from the Ottoman Empire to Republic of Turkey. From its earliest days, the dominant history of the republic was told as a triumphant narrative of national self-determination and secular democratic…
 
How does egg freezing reshape our conception of time, aging and fertility? In her new monograph, Freezing Fertility: Oocyte Cryopreservation and the Gender Politics of Aging (NYU Press, 2020) Dr. Lucy van de Wiel explores the significance of egg freezing in re-orienting the temporality of the gender politics of aging. Dr. van de Wiel argues that it…
 
In the late nineteenth century, as humans came to realize that our rapidly industrializing and globalizing societies were driving other animal species to extinction, a movement to protect and conserve them was born. In Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction (Norton, 2021), acclaimed science journalist Michelle Nijhuis traces the …
 
Learn about the benefits of Googling symptoms; truly random number generation; and why science is about storytelling. Googling symptoms makes patients better at self-diagnosis by Steffie Drucker A visit to “Dr. Google” makes patients better at diagnosis. (2021). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/bawh-avt032621.php Levine, …
 
That fuzzy sandwich in your fridge? Yeah, don't eat that kind of fungus. But the mushrooms in your stir fry? Or the yeast in your bread? Or the rind on your brie? Or the miso in your soup? All of those delicious foods are possible thanks to fungus! In this episode, we'll learn about how our ancestors first figured it out some mushrooms were safe to…
 
Robert is joined by Jamie Loftus to discuss Dr, Phil. FOOTNOTES: https://www.statnews.com/2017/12/28/dr-phil-guests-say-show-risks-health-of-some-addicts/ https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/scaachikoul/dr-phil-mcgraw-mental-health-danielle-bregoli https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/analyze-this-6395801 https://www.drphil.com/about-dr-phil/ https…
 
What are beans? Do they contain the souls of the dead? Can they be used to drive demons from the household? How important are they in the human diet? In this Stuff to Blow Your Mind two-parter, Robert and Joe discuss a variety of magical ideas and scientific facts associated with legumes. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcas…
 
John is joined by friends-of-the-show Tyler Tully and Danielle Hanley to discuss Audra Simpson‘s Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States (Duke UP, 2014). The book — simultaneously a work of political theory, ethnography, and settler colonial studies — thinks with the Kahnawà:ke Mohawks to examine the situated product…
 
Everything you use, from your home to your smartphone, from highways to supermarkets, was designed by someone. What did they get right? Where did they go wrong? And what can we learn from how these experts think that can help us improve our own lives? In How Design Makes The World, bestselling author and designer Scott Berkun reveals how designers,…
 
In this episode, we are talking to a British writer Ian Leslie, a journalist and author of acclaimed books on human behavior. His latest book, Conflicted: How Productive Disagreements Lead to Better Outcomes (Harper Business, 2021), is about how to disagree better. Ian regularly publishes in The Guardian, The New Statesman and The Economist. He co-…
 
In this episode, host J.J. Mull interviews Daniel José Gaztambide about his book, A People’s History of Psychoanalysis: From Freud to Liberation Psychology (Lexington Books, 2021). The project traces a global intellectual lineage spanning from the first generation of analysts in Europe to Harlem, the Caribbean, and finally, to Latin America. Challe…
 
In 2020, an estimated 5.8 million Americans had Alzheimer’s, and more than half a million died because of the disease and its devastating complications. 16 million caregivers are responsible for paying as much as half of the $226 billion annual costs of their care. As more people live beyond their seventies and eighties, the number of patients will…
 
In this episode, we are talking to a British writer Ian Leslie, a journalist and author of acclaimed books on human behavior. His latest book, Conflicted: How Productive Disagreements Lead to Better Outcomes (Harper Business, 2021), is about how to disagree better. Ian regularly publishes in The Guardian, The New Statesman and The Economist. He co-…
 
Mira Sucharov’s new book, Borders and Belonging: A Memoir (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020), is a work that takes seriously the feminist adage that the “personal is political,” and vice versa. Through an intimate telling of her life, Sucharov uses the work to trace her shifting relationship to Israel, and the Israeli-Plaestinitan conflict, the meaning of …
 
Learn about how lightning strikes led to life on Earth; the self-control of cuttlefish; and your roommate’s feelings. Lightning strikes were vital to the origin of life on Earth by Grant Currin Lightning strikes played a vital role in life’s origins on Earth. (2021). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/uol-lsp031621.php ‌Hes…
 
In the final episode of Season 2, Greg and Patrick enlist the help of colleagues in a conversation about the joys and challenges of being a good mentor. Along the way they also discuss Cinco de Cuatro, Fozzie Bear, trash compactors and rubber snakes, pitchers at Linda's, giant jugs of wine, meeting the dog, someone in the control tower, 20 to life,…
 
Welcome to Awesome Etiquette, where we explore modern etiquette through the lens of consideration, respect and honesty. On today’s show we take your questions on wearing white to weddings, expensive bachelorette parties, verifying vaccine information for events, and people going through your things when they visit your home. For Awesome Etiquette S…
 
I sat down with Dr. Sean Manning, author of the new book: Armed Force in the Teispid-Achaemenid Empire: Past Approaches, Future Prospects to discuss the military might of the Persian Empire (and why it's so hard to find anything written about it). That includes both the academic nuances of which sources deserve primacy, and ever exciting topics of …
 
Providing one of the first comprehensive, cross-cultural examinations of the dynamic market for sexual services, this book presents an evidence-based look at the multiple factors related to purchasing patterns and demand among clients who have used the internet. The data is drawn from two large surveys of sex workers' clients in the US and UK. The …
 
Tetyana Lokot's new book Beyond the Protest Square: Digital Media and Augmented Dissent (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021) examines how citizens use digital social media to engage in public discontent and offers a critical examination of the hybrid reality of protest where bodies, spaces and technologies resonate. It argues that the augmented reality of …
 
Dr. Alison M. Parker’s new book Unceasing Militant: The Life of Mary Church Terrell (University of North Carolina Press, 2020) explores the life of civil rights activist and feminist, Mary Church Terrell. Born into slavery at the end of the Civil War, Terrell (1863-1954) became one of the most prominent activists of her time -- working at the inter…
 
In this episode Kennth Bo Nielsen of Asianettverket at the University of Oslo is joined by Niladri Chatterjee (University of Oslo), Zaad Mahmoud (Presidency University) and Arild Engelsen Ruud (University of Oslo) to analyse the results of the recently concluded West Bengal state assembly elections. The elections dealt a major blow to the expansion…
 
Tetyana Lokot's new book Beyond the Protest Square: Digital Media and Augmented Dissent (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021) examines how citizens use digital social media to engage in public discontent and offers a critical examination of the hybrid reality of protest where bodies, spaces and technologies resonate. It argues that the augmented reality of …
 
Learn about how to stop Zoom fatigue; a world that may be on its second atmosphere; and koalas’ human-like fingerprints. 4 reasons you feel "Zoom fatigue" and how to get over them, according to Stanford research by Kelsey Donk: Stanford Zoom Exhaustion and Fatigue Scale survey: https://comm.stanford.edu/ZEF Ramachandran, V. (2021, February 23). Fou…
 
In this episode, Chris Hadnagy and Maxie Reynolds are joined by industry professional Jack Schafer, PhD. Dr. Schafer is a psychologist, professor, intelligence consultant, and former FBI Special Agent. Dr. Schafer spent fifteen years conducting counter-intelligence and counterterrorism investigations, and seven years as a behavioral analyst for the…
 
Is Satanism going mainstream, or is it angelicism in disguise? ✦ Check out Barrett's Contain podcast at patreon.com/contain ✦ Download the René Girard reading list at girardcourse.com​ Are you working on a long-term intellectual project? ✦ Request an invitation to indiethinkers.org​By Justin Murphy
 
Analysis of the 78,0000-year-old fossil of a Kenyan boy reveals he was likely buried with care and attention, the body wrapped and laid to rest supported on a pillow. Maria Martinon-Torres, of the National Research Centre on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain, and a team from Kenya and Germany used techniques from paleontology and forensic science to…
 
Christian and Connor sit down with Helen Yaffe to discuss her book We Are Cuba. We talked about the history and political economy of revolutionary Cuba before and after the post-Soviet period. Some of topics we touched on were the nature of democracy on the island, the relationship of Cuba to the United States, and how Cuba has dealt with the pande…
 
On this day in 1893, the Kinetoscope had its first public demonstration at the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. / On this day in 1671, Thomas Blood attempted to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.comBy iHeartRadio & HowStuffWorks
 
0:00:00 Introduction Richard Saunders 0:04:00 Letter to the Editor A follow up to a story we mentioned a few weeks ago where a letter to the editor was published in the Byron Bay Echo newspaper. This week we feature the response from skeptic Ken McLeod. Just who is this mysterious midwife who is complaining about COVID-19 vaccinations? 0:10:20 Craz…
 
On this day in 1945, the massacre of Algerian civilians by French authorities and European Algerians began in retaliation for anti-colonial demonstrations. / On this day in 1963, South Vietnamese soldiers and security forces fired into a crowd of unarmed Buddhist protesters, marking the start of the Buddhist crisis. Learn more about your ad-choices…
 
Books are one of humanity’s greatest inventions, but where do they come from? In this classic Stuff to Blow Your Mind two-parter, Robert and Joe explore the history of book technology, from ancient clay tablets and papyrus scrolls to the codex and beyond. (Originally published 5/26/2020) Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcast…
 
Cytobacteria?, Invisible Fences, Jurassic Garden, Zee Deeehnay, Branching Worms, Simulated Impact, COVID Update, 1 To 3, Baby Mantis Punch, Holographic Histopathology, Fertility Feed, Bat Senses, Seat Of Consciousness, Cinco de Mayo Science News... The post 05 May, 2021 – Episode 823 – Cinco de Mayo Science Salsa! appeared first on This Week in Sci…
 
Complexity is all around us: in the paths we walk through pathless woods, the strategies we use to park our cars, the dynamics of an elevator as it cycles up and down a building. Zoom out far enough and the phenomena of everyday existence start revealing hidden links, suggesting underlying universal patterns. At great theoretic heights, it all yiel…
 
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