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Best Society Podcasts We Could Find
Best Society Podcasts We Could Find
Over the years, podcasts have become an increasingly popular medium because they are well-packed, can be followed from any place, at any time and without Internet connection. Listening to podcasts enables people gain a clearer insight about the social affairs and social issues in every corner of the world. In this catalog, there are podcasts where well-read hosts and guests discuss about people of different religions and their way of life and culture, of different communities, countries, continents, different philosophies as well as different points of view on society. Also, literature fans can learn more about the latest news from their favourite genres, emerging authors, current best selling books and literary theories. Furthermore, people can find interviews and true and inspiring life stories told by people from all walks of life. Some podcasts house activists who fight for the rights of the oppressed, ranging from animals to people, aiming at creating a better society.
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Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
 
Author Dana Schwartz explores the stories of some of history’s most fascinating royals: the tyrants and the tragic, the murderers and the murdered, and everyone in between. Because when you’re wearing a crown, mistakes often mean blood. New episodes every two weeks, on Tuesdays.
 
Family Secrets. We all have them. And while the discovery of family secrets can initially be terrifying or traumatic, often these discoveries have the power to liberate, heal, and even uplift us. Join Dani Shapiro, bestselling author of the memoir Inheritance, and her guests as they explore astonishing family secrets and uncover the extraordinary lessons the truth can teach us.
 
How did Larry Nassar, an Olympic gymnastics doctor, get away with abusing hundreds of women and girls for two decades? Believed is an inside look at how a team of women won a conviction in one of the largest serial sexual abuse cases in U.S. history. It's a story of survivors finding their power in a cultural moment when people are coming to understand how important that is. It's also an unnerving exploration of how even well-meaning adults can fail to believe.
 
Awaken, discover and connect to the deeper meaning of the world around you with Super Soul. Hear Oprah’s personal selection of her interviews with thought-leaders, best-selling authors, spiritual luminaries, as well as health and wellness experts. All designed to light you up, guide you through life’s big questions and help bring you one step closer to your best self.
 
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Based on Chung's own childhood, 'Minari' is about a Korean American family that moves to rural Arkansas to start a farm. The director spoke with contributor Arun Venugopal about the memories that inspired the film, why he initially kept the project a secret from his family, and choosing the title of the movie. 'Minari' just won a Golden Globe for b…
 
Over almost 30 years in 11th-century Constantinople, sometimes Zoë ruled alongside one of her husbands, sometimes she and Theodora ruled together, and in the end, Theodora ruled alone. All against a backdrop of distrust and intrigue and possibly murder. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Nissim Black grew up in the American city of Seattle, where he made his name rapping about drug dealing and drive-by shootings. These were all subjects that were familiar to him, and his music was doing well, but nevertheless Nissim became increasingly unhappy with the gangster image he portrayed. He started as a Christian looking for answers in th…
 
From May mothers' names will finally be featured alongside fathers' details on marriage certificates, in England and Wales thanks to years of campaigning both inside and outside of parliament. We hear from Ailsa Burkimsher Sadler who started the campaign for change back in 2013 and Revd Canon Dr Sandra Millar who is the Church of England’s Head of …
 
Mary Hollingsworth discusses her new book, Princes of the Renaissance, which charts the wars and alliances between the powerful Italian families of the 15th and 16th centuries Mary Hollingsworth discusses her new book Princes of the Renaissance, which charts the wars and alliances between the powerful Italian families of the 15th and 16th centuries…
 
On 13 May 1985 a police helicopter dropped explosives on a house in residential Philadelphia, in an attempt to end a stand-off with radical black activists from an organisaton called MOVE. Fire spread quickly through the surrounding buildings and 11 people died, including five children. All the victims belonged to MOVE. A total of sixty houses in t…
 
There is no moving up and out in the world unless we are fully acquainted with the person we are meant to be. Whatever our calling, it’s already rooted within, and while those roots may get trampled on or tugged at, they can never be removed. They grow stronger only when tended, nurtured and most importantly, shared with others. In this Super Soul …
 
Stephen Sackur speaks to the European Commission’s Executive Vice-President with responsibility for the economy and trade, Valdis Dombrovskis. Protectionism and nationalism are on the rise in global trade. With the US and China locked in strategic competition, is the EU ready to aggressively defend its interests?…
 
Eliot Higgins is the founder of an online collective that picks apart conspiracy theories and investigates war crimes and hate crimes using clues from the Internet — like social media posts, leaked databases and free satellite maps. We talk about how Bellingcat traced the origin of the missile that shot down flight MH17 in Ukraine, the ethics of th…
 
In 1859, a dispute between neighbors in the San Juan Islands of the Pacific Northwest led to the untimely death of a local (and very unlucky) pig. What could have been an easily resolved situation quickly ignited simmering tensions between the US and the UK, both of whom claimed the islands as their own territory. In the days and weeks after, soldi…
 
Sue Brierley adopted her son, Saroo, after he had been found wandering the streets of Kolkata as a five year old. He had got on a train that took him across India and away from his birth family, and couldn’t find his way back. Sue always believed that Saroo’s birth mother was alive, and would send comforting thoughts to her every night, sharing the…
 
Gordon Campbell reveals how the Vikings made epic voyages of discovery across the Atlantic a millennium ago The argument over whether Norse explorers settled in North America a millennium ago has raged for two centuries, pitting Protestants against Catholics, Native Americans against European colonists – and producing claims and counterclaims often…
 
As International Women’s Day approaches, and peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban continue, what are the most pressing issues facing women in Afghanistan? Emma is joined by BBC Afghan reporter Mahjooba Nowrouzi, and scholar and women’s rights advocate Dr Orzala Ashraf Nemat.Actor, Sue Johnston has spoken about the sexism older …
 
Thanks to the popularity of the television series The Crown, a new generation has become captivated by Princess Diana—her life and her tragedy. She remains an enigmatic figure, undeniably captivating, for both her vulnerability and her power. To better understand her life, and her legacy, Dana speaks with Sarah Marshall and Michael Hobbes of the po…
 
DeRay, Kaya, De'Ara, and Sam dive into the underreported news of the week, including drug prosecutions, Billie Holiday, Nashlie Sephus, Black American sign language on Tik Tok. Netta Elzie gives an update on what's happening with the nationwide protests. DeRay sits down with Johnny Celestin to discuss the political situation in Haiti. De'Ara interv…
 
In her new book Work Mate Marry Love, Harvard professor Debora Spar argues that nearly all the decisions we make in our most intimate lives — whom we marry, how we have children, and how we build families — are driven by technology. She explains how these changes in technology have also affected the role of women in society throughout history.…
 
The sleight-of-hand master explores themes of identity, honesty and the emotional cost of keeping secrets in the memoir, 'AMORALMAN.' DelGaudio's one-man show 'In & Of Itself' is now available on Hulu. "[Secrets] are like a drug," he says. "They enter your system and they intoxicate you and they get you to modify your behavior, whether you know it …
 
Catherine Pepinster, Kate Kennedy, Tim Stanley and New Generation Thinker Dafydd Mills Daniel join Rana Mitter to look at the poet, theologian and now Saint John Henry. The programme marks 175 years since Newman's conversion from the high church tradition of Anglicanism and the Oxford Movement to the Catholic faith on 23 Feb 1846, with a conversati…
 
In 1961, American couple Allan and Sandra Jaffe were on their honeymoon when they stumbled upon some of their favourite jazz musicians playing at a small art gallery in New Orleans. Within days the young couple had been offered the chance to run the place. Over the next 30 years they helped turn it into one of the city’s jazz institutions, Preserva…
 
As the government announces plans for summer school and tutoring to help children catch up on their learning we hear from parents who think it’s more important to just let them go out to play with their friends. Recent polling suggests that mums in the “Red Wall” seats of the Midlands and North of England – areas which traditionally voted Labour bu…
 
Journalist Andrea Pitzer discusses her latest book Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World, which recounts the Arctic ordeal of Dutch explorer William Barents and his crew. In 1597, they set sail in a bid to find a North East passage to China, but spent nine months fighting off ravenous polar bears, extreme cold and a seemingly endless winte…
 
Sarah's other show has a special guest! Maintenance Phase co-host Aubrey Gordon visits Why Are Dads to talk about Christopher Nolan, trash masculinity and the dwindling number of non-problematic superheroes. Where to find us: Sarah's other show, Why Are Dads Mike's other show, Maintenance Phase Support us: Subscribe on Patreon Donate on Paypal Buy …
 
Don Walsh was the first to go to the very bottom of the deepest part of the ocean in 1960 in a specially designed submarine, the Bathyscaphe Trieste. The water pressure was 800 tonnes per square inch, and the successful mission to "Challenger Deep" in the Mariana Trench under the western Pacific, was a technological breakthrough in marine engineeri…
 
In the story of the Bible, all the main players are prophets, priests, or kings. While it might seem foreign to us today, those three roles are intimately connected to what it means to be people created in the image of God. Join Tim and Jon for the first episode of a new series on the royal priesthood! View full show notes from this episode → Times…
 
For free mental health resources, please visit SomethingWasWrong.com/Resources Support SWW on Patreon for as little as $1 a month Follow Tiffany Reese on Instagram Music from Glad Rags album Wonder Under Thank you to SWW's sponsors! Get a special offer from Stamps.com that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. No long-term …
 
New Generation Thinker Dr Islam Issa has a strong cultural attachment to the Balcony. In his native Egypt, the place where architectural historians believe the balcony was first developed, the balcony is a pivotal part of family homes, a place that blurs the line between private and public living. He recalls it being a place that linked communities…
 
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