show episodes
 
Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. Change your perspe ...
 
The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange. Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Won ...
 
How does work culture shape human behavior and experience? How do humans create cultures? From uncomfortable truths to heart-to-heart conversations, Culture First uncovers what it really takes to build a better world of work. We all aspire to rise above the day-to-day commotion and bring more humanity into our work lives. Our host Damon Klotz is dedicated to understanding how we find meaning in our work and how to better the experience humans have within organizations. Join him as he explore ...
 
How is it that two opposites can share the same brain? Pete, from Melbourne, Australia, Jen, from New York City, USA. Pete, at 6”7’, Jen, at 5”1”. Pete, the human periscope, Jen, the human stethoscope. Pete, the millennial, Jen, the Gen-X. Pete, at inbox zero, Jen, at inbox chaos. Pete, who wears jumpers, Jen, who wears sweaters. The Long and The Short Of It is a product of these differences. It’s a weekly podcast for curious folks ready to explore the art and science of being human from eve ...
 
A podcast for the bold and curious to help you navigate our world's accelerating weirdness — about science and the philosophy of it, prehistory and post-humanity and deep time, non-human agency and non-duality, science fiction and the stories we regard as real, complex systems and sustainability (or lack thereof), psychedelics as a form of training for a weirding present and proliferating futures, art and creativity as service and as inquiry. Join paleontologist-futurist Michael Garfield eve ...
 
What makes you … you? Is it your DNA, culture, environment? SAPIENS hosts Jen Shannon, Esteban Gómez, and SAPIENS.org Editor-in-Chief Chip Colwell speak with anthropologists from around the globe to help us uncover what makes us human. Subscribe now to learn more. The SAPIENS podcast is supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and produced by House of Pod.
 
You don't need to sell all your stuff and jump on an airplane to find out what it's like to live or travel as a foreigner in Asia! Join the oddly and aptly named Big and White, two expat ladies who have already taken the plunge, as they chat about the joys and sorrows of moving to a new culture and sticking out like a sore thumb. Whether it's discussing the finer points of driving in Kathmandu traffic, chatting about stomach parasites, or reminiscing about the time they accidentally asked fo ...
 
Online Gods is a monthly podcast on digital cultures and their political ramifications, featuring lively conversations with scholars and activists. Presented by anthropologist Ian M. Cook, the podcast is a key initiative of the five year ERC project ONLINERPOL www.fordigitaldignity.com led by media anthropologist Sahana Udupa at LMU Munich, and cohosted by HAU Network for Ethnographic Theory. Online Gods represents our collective commitment to multimedia diffusion of research in accessible a ...
 
Kentucky Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington, D.C. The Council is supported by the National Endowment and by private contributions. We are not a state agency, and we receive no state funds, but we are proud partners with Kentucky's cultural, heritage, arts, and tourism agencies. Why are we Telling Kentucky's Story? More than just history, by Kentucky's story we mean Kentucky's writers, inventors, judges, musicians, arch ...
 
From the Southeast Asia Program at Cornell University, the Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast features interviews and conversations with scholars and researchers working in and around Southeast Asia, all of whom have been invited to give a Gatty Lecture at Cornell University. Conversations cover the history, politics, economics, literature, art, and cultures of the region. Interviews are hosted by graduate students at Cornell University, and podcast topics cover the many nations and peoples of Sou ...
 
In this podcast, I’m going to chat with the interesting, remarkable, and sometimes downright crazy people I’ve met from my travels and time living abroad. I’ve spent a good part of my adult life traveling, and the last decade living in places like Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Cambodia, Thailand, and the Philippines.During that time, I’ve run into some of the most amazing people you can imagine. This podcast is a forum for me to share their voices, their stories, and give you a glimpse into their l ...
 
Tribal Research Specialist: The Podcast tackle real issues related to research by Tribal people and for their communities. The show is hosted by Dr. Shandin Pete (Salish/Diné) and Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke). Dr. Pete resides on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Arlee, Montana. He completed a M.S. in Geology and an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Montana. Brien resides in Arlee, MT and on the Crow Indian Reservation. He completed his M.A. in Anthropology at the Univer ...
 
The Tympanic Eclipse is an audio podcast that brings cultural theory out of its stuffy scholarly tomes, and puts it into your ears! Together with established thinkers and makers, it explores wide ranging issues we’re facing in the 21st century. Without using academic jargon or relying on journalistic sensationalism, The Tympanic Eclipse points out theory’s relevance to everyday life. This project received the IdeasTap Innovator’s Award and is produced by Britt Wray (www.brittwray.com). Pleas ...
 
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show series
 
Have you ever worried about a yak interrupting your sleep? In this episode, your hosts Big and White reminisce about some of the wild and wacky places they’ve slept. Listen now to hear about balancing on planks, strange decor, mouse attacks, and more! For tips on sleeping in airports: https://www.sleepinginairports.net/…
 
Between Muslims Religious Difference in Iraqi Kurdistan (Stanford UP, 2020) by J. Andrew Bush asks what it means to be Muslim, yet not pious, in Iraqi Kurdistan. Though Islam is often represented in terms of either daily devotion, such as prayer and fasting, or abandonment of faith, there are many who turn away from tradition without departing from…
 
In Gentrification Down the Shore (Rutgers University Press, 2020), Molly Vollman Makris and Mary Gatta engage in a rich ethnographic investigation of Asbury Park to better understand the connection between jobs and seasonal gentrification and the experiences of longtime residents in this beach-community city. They demonstrate how the racial inequal…
 
How should we understand creative work? In Creative Control: The Ambivalence of Work in the Culture Industries (Columbia UP, 2021), Michael Siciliano, an assistant professor of sociology at Queen's University, Canada, explores this question through a comparison of a recording studio and a digital content creation company. The book considers the mea…
 
Today I talked to Dilara Yarbrough about her article "Nothing About Us Without Us: Reading Protests against Oppressive Knowledge Production as Guidelines for Solidarity Research," published in the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography (2019). Dilara Yarbrough is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Dil…
 
This episode is about the growth of technology, its affect on our youth, its affect on interpersonal relationships and its effect on our evolution as a species and as individuals. We talk about how being liked in this age means something different than it has in the past and how you should not let social media dictate your acceptance.…
 
This week on THINK HUMANITIES, host Bill Goodman interviews Speakers Bureau member Blair Hess. Blair is Assistant Director for the Council of State Governments and has coauthored several books with Cameron Ludwick all about Kentucky's unique sightseeing and culinary opportunities.THINK HUMANITIES is made possible by generous funding from Spalding U…
 
In today’s episode Adam and Astrid Countee are joined by multispecies anthropologist John Hartigan jr. John is an anthropology professor at the University of Texas at Austin. In his latest work, Shaving the Beasts: Wild Horses and Ritual in Spain, John studies the social lives of wild horses in Spain and Catalonia and the Spanish ritual dating back…
 
"… I am an axe; And my son a handle, soon; To be shaping again, model; And tool, craft of culture; How we go on." - Gary Snyder, Axe Handles (1983) "… wisdom comes to those who understand the student is more important than the teacher in the lineage of knowledge." - Wade Davis, New Books Network (2021) Of the three major influences on Wade Davis’ l…
 
From submarines to the suburbs--the remaking of Pittsburgh during the Cold War During the early Cold War, research facilities became ubiquitous features of suburbs across the United States. Pittsburgh's eastern and southern suburbs hosted a constellation of such facilities that became the world's leading center for the development of nuclear reacto…
 
In this week's episode of the Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast, Michael chats with Joe Pittayaporn about a talk he gave at Cornell in February 2021, as part of the Gatty Lecture series. That talk, was titled, "Old Thai and the Arrival of Thai in Central Thailand." Joe and Michael also discuss his broader work on the history of language in Thailand, and…
 
Jen and Pete noodle on a word that has been trending lately: multi-hyphenates Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: What is a multi-hyphenate? What might be the benefits of having varied interests and proficiencies? Is Jen a multi-hyphenate? Is Pete? To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It …
 
Welcome to Season 6 of The Unusual History of Every Thing, where we will be revamping a few of the episodes you heard all those years ago in Season 1, and sprinkling them in with new ones. On this week's episode, we’re taking you back to Season 1, Episode 1: where we’ll show you how gnomes went from dwarves to elves to gardens.…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: LIDAR surveys provides new details about Maya civilizations in the northern Yucatán (details) X-ray testing reveals Egyptian mummy was a pregnant woman (details) Disruptions in Ancestral Puebloan societies attributed to the intersection of climate challenges with social tensions (details) First settlers i…
 
In post-Suharto Indonesian politics the exchange of patronage for political support is commonplace. Clientelism saturates the political system through everyday practices of vote buying, influence peddling, manipulating government programs, and skimming money from government projects. In this episode of New Books in Southeast Asian Studies, Professo…
 
Talking about social class and the American class structure is a challenge. It can be easy to talk about the class system too rigidly, implying that “the rich stay rich while the poor stay poor.” Yet in our individualistic culture, much rhetoric suggests that anything is possible, which can dismiss the privileges or constraints that come with socia…
 
This week Clair brings you an interview with Dr Yasmine Musharbash! Dr. Yasmine Musharbash is a senior lecturer at the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University. Her fieldwork is based in central Australia, and primarily centred on the Yuendumu, an Aboriginal community about three hours northwest of Alice Springs.…
 
In this episode, Damon speaks with Aubrey Blanche, Director of Equitable Impact & Design at Culture Amp. Damon and Aubrey discuss building anti-racist organizations, the work of Professor Ibram X. Kendi & her first memories of what equality and inclusion meant as a young child. You’ll also hear some special reveals about the content and speakers fo…
 
In the 47th episode of the Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast, Michael sits down with John Burgess, author and former journalist at the Washington Post, to discuss a recent lecture he gave at Cornell, titled, "Cambodia's Angkor Temples as a Military Prize: The World War II Experience." They also discuss John's broader book project, Angkor's Temples in th…
 
This week, Jen and Pete dive in to a phrase that they often utter before sitting down to record a podcast episode: "I got nothin'." Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: Why might Jen and Pete lean on that saying to begin recording? What does Pete do to get himself started on a project? And Jen? How might establishing a practice he…
 
Covid isn’t the first pandemic that we as a species have had to endure, and it won’t be the last. What we know for sure is that each one started out as either a virus or bacteria. Figuring out how to treat and/or cure them is the tricky part, and the frightening part is that viruses and bacteria were here before us, and they’ll probably still be he…
 
“The most expensive part of making this book was time. I spent my time, which is my scarcest resource. For every one of the nearly 9,000 images in this book, I was standing directly behind the camera. I had to get there. It’s not just a long way from the US to Asia, it was usually a long way from the airport to the local town in the countryside. An…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Turkish archaeologists discover Roman-era gladiator arena (details) Traces of cabin belonging to Harriet Tubman’s father uncovered at Maryland site (details) New study shows how humans have sustainably shaped Earth’s ecology for millennia (details) Famous “Little Foot” fossil gives greater insight into th…
 
Believers: Faith in Human Nature (Norton, 2019) is a scientist's answer to attacks on faith by some well-meaning scientists and philosophers. It is a firm rebuke of the "Four Horsemen"--Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens--known for writing about religion as something irrational and ultimately harmful. Anthropologi…
 
How are immigrants’ lives shaped by cultural and political dynamics in their homeland, hostland, and “elsewhere” countries whose geopolitical dynamics affect their experiences (such as South Asian Muslims who are affected by post-9/11 and more recent backlash against Middle Eastern nations)? In today’s podcast, we talk with Tahseen Shams, Assistant…
 
Megan Ryburn’s Uncertain Citizenship: Everyday Practices of Bolivian Migrants in Chile (University of California Press, 2018) is a multi-sited ethnography of citizenship practices of Bolivian migrants in Chile. The book asks readers to think beyond a binary category of citizen/noncitizen when looking at migrant practices and spaces. Instead, Uncert…
 
Hi, we are Olivia and Oliver. This episode is a platform for our next few episodes. This particular episode is an examination using our minds as a lens to examine our beliefs on the creation of humanity by means of creationism and evolution. We talk about both creationism and evolution as it pertains to the state of humanity. This is really and opp…
 
The first in-depth study of the All World Gayatri Pariwar, a modern Indian religious movement. The All World Gayatri Pariwar is a modern religious movement that enjoys wide popularity in North India, particularly among the many STEM workers who joined after becoming disillusioned with their lucrative but unfulfilling private-sector careers. Founded…
 
Tropics of Savagery: The Culture of Japanese Empire in Comparative Frame (U California Press, 2010) is an incisive and provocative study of the figures and tropes of “savagery” in Japanese colonial culture. Through a rigorous analysis of literary works, ethnographic studies, and a variety of other discourses, Robert Thomas Tierney demonstrates how …
 
This week the THINK HUMANITIES podcast is celebrating Poetry Month! Host Bill Goodman talks to members of a documentary film project called Poetry Unites Kentucky. Filmmaker Ewa Zadrzynska worked with a number of Kentucky poets, including former Poet Laureate Richard Taylor, to ask Kentuckians to write a personal essay about their favorite poem. Tw…
 
In Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future: Kanaka Maoli and Critical Settler Cartographies in Hawai'i (Duke University Press, 2021), Candace Fujikane draws upon Hawaiian stories about the land and water and their impact upon Native Hawai'ian struggles to argue that Native economies of abundance provide a foundation for collective work against cli…
 
In this week's episode of the Gatty Lecture Rewind, Michael sits down with Van Tran to discuss her recent Gatty Lecture, "Activist Resilience under Repression:  The Role of Bystander Protection in the Burmese Pro-Democracy Movement." The organizations and individuals mentioned in the podcast are: (myanmar-now.org), (frontiermyanmar.net), (@the_ayem…
 
Pete has broken a streak, and he and Jen noodle on why it may be difficult to get back on track, and come up with different ways to recover a good habit. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: What might cause a break down in a good routine? Why might it be difficult to get back into the swing of a healthy habit? What are some diffe…
 
In this episode, I interview Kas Saghafi, associate professor of philosophy at the University of Memphis, about his book The World After the End of the World, published through SUNY Press in 2020. In this book, Kas Saghafi argues that the notion of “the end the world” in Derrida’s late work is not a theological or cosmological matter, but a meditat…
 
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Biochemical studies of potsherds reveal oldest evidence of honey use in west Africa (details) Sites in Senegal show the long duration of Middle Stone Age culture in West Africa (details) Pacific Coast peoples diets consisted of more than salmon (details) Scholars contradict recent claims of pre-Columbian …
 
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